Jump to content


Friday, April 27


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 09:36 AM

Reviews of Armitage Gone! Dance.

Time Out Chicago (blog)

If punk is bad breath, holes in clothes, shit hair and three chords (at most), then Drastic-Classicism (1981) by choreographer Karole Armitage is punk-as-costume. But you can’t be punk and be perfect by the laws of ballet; your stage smile has to be fake and you have to wobble a bit when you balance. To be punk in ballet is to proudly declare that you are good f______ enough. Self-satisfied becomes punk where anti-perfectionism is scandalous.


The Chicago Tribune

Another '80s entry, "The Watteau Duets," is dated and wearying, its anarchic meltdown involving two dancers and two onstage musicians great fodder for the time, transparent and belabored now, though band members Matt Mottel and Kevin Shea do a nice job of stealing the show, out-boogying the dancers. At least that's revolution, too, come to think of it.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 09:37 AM

Hugo Fiorato has died at age 98.

Mr. Fiorato, who was with City Ballet for 56 years, was a figure of continuity surpassed only by George Balanchine, who founded it in 1948 with Mr. Fiorato’s mentor, the conductor Leon Barzin.

Mr. Fiorato held almost every job the company had to offer, starting as its first concertmaster in 1948. “I was concertmaster, librarian, I did everything except sweep the floors,” he once told an interviewer. “It was wonderful to be there in those early days.”



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 09:40 AM

Q&A with Angel Corella.

Q: Are you feeling emotional about leaving ABT?

A: Yes and no. After 17 years with ABT, I feel like it's my home. It's how I started. I was a prince with ABT by 19. But I need to be with my company, where I can share the knowledge of all these years with all these fantastic young dancers. It's life. I was incredibly lucky to have a wonderful career. I got to dance on "Sesame Street" and performed for three U.S. presidents. Now it's time for me to do something else.

Q: What have you learned since starting your own company?

A: There are so many things you don't think are important when you're a dancer, like, "How much is a pair of pointe shoes?" or "How much does a tutu cost?" You just take your bag and show up. But as a director, you carry all of that with you. People say the way I'm dancing now is a lot more intense and revealing of my personality. As a director, I understand that every performance has to be wonderful - magical not just for the audience but for the sponsors presenting it.



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 09:41 AM

A review of North Carolina Dance Theatre in "Dangerous Liaisons" by Steven Brown in The Charlotte Observer.

When he turned "Dangerous Liaisons" into a ballet, Sasha Janes made a clever change. He took a character who's a music teacher in the original story and changed him into a fencing instructor.

That sets things up so the scene at the midpoint of this tale of serial seduction – premiered by N.C. Dance Theatre on Thursday – can unfold in a fencing class. In this class, each pair of students consists of a man and a woman, sparring and teasing at the same time. The fencing foils become weapons of flirtation.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:06 AM

A review of Ballet Revolución by Clement Crisp in The Financial Times.

http://www.ft.com/cm...l#ixzz1tGVZG58f

The cast all have knowledge of ballet technique. The largely male ensemble can leap with the best, spin like tops and strike poses suggestive of macho energy, ill-suppressed passion and an urgent desire further to express their feelings for their partners. The women, who are – how shall I put it? – sturdy and strong-toed, have a tendency to rotate on their own axes with unnecessary frequency, and find themselves, surely too often for comfort, in a position known in France as le grand écart.



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:13 AM

The Royal Danish Ballet presents a Balanchine-Stravinsky triple bill.

Balanchine’s works have become increasingly prominent in the Royal Danish Ballet’s repertoire since Nikolaj Hübbe took up the post as the company’s artistic director in 2008. Hübbe spent a considerable part of his career as a principal dancer with the New York City Ballet, before returning to his hometown Copenhagen. Three of Balanchine’s works have already featured in the Royal Danish Ballet’s 2011/12 season, including his dazzling version of The Nutcracker over Christmas, which hadn’t been performed in Europe since the early 1970s.



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:15 AM

Reviews of Scottish Ballet in "A Streetcar Named Desire."

The Guardian

Peter Salem's score is a crucial narrative ingredient, both in its graphic sound-effects and in the musical colours of its fractured percussion and insinuating jazz. But most effective is the pure dance expression. There's too little of it, perhaps, but Ochoa's choreographic language can be shockingly truthful: the blind head-nuzzling desire of Alan's homosexual initiation; Stanley's rape of Blanche; Stella's unsettling neediness as she hurls herself at Stanley. Eve Mutso is good as Blanche (although she could be more abject); Tama Barry delivers a threatening heft as Stanley; and Sophie Martin's Stella is excellent – a tiny, vivid bundle of conflicted emotion.


The Evening Standard

Scottish Ballet’s A Streetcar Named Desire could serve as a template for how to tell a story with dance. Instead of calling on one creative vision, Streetcar paired up Nancy Meckler, co-director of the Shared Experience theatre company, with Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, a young Belgian-Colombian choreographer with an impressive list of credits but no experience of making a full-length narrative dance.



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 27 April 2012 - 10:18 AM

Not all "Strictly Come Dancing" fans are thrilled with the prospect of Darcey Bussell as a regular on the show, apparently.

The ballet star was announced earlier this week as the long awaited replacement for Alesha Dixon, but got a less than positive reception from fans.

The mum-of-two previously guest judged on the show in 2009, with viewers branding her dull and ‘too nice’.




#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,099 posts

Posted 28 April 2012 - 11:31 AM

A review of the second weekend of Texas Ballet Theater's Portraits Ballet Festival by Mark Lowry in The Star-Telegram.

The weakest piece of the night was a revival of Ben Stevenson's Image. That wasn't the fault of dancer Carolyn Judson, who exhibited enviable emotion though movement in this solo story ballet inspired by Marilyn Monroe. The work is so over-the-top melodramatic, as she looks in the mirror and wonders what she will be and later has become, that it'd be laughable if you weren't too busy rolling your eyes.

The third work was a revival of Val Caniparoli's Lambarena, which, in eight sections, combines African rhythms (music and dance) with classical, fusing Bach and traditional African songs. The ensemble was exquisite throughout, moving from the torso-writing and arm-flailing of African dance to classical ballet without missing a beat and staying in sync. The juxtaposition of the ebullient African dance with the longing of the Bach is unforgettable. Dancers Carl Coomer and Leticia Oliveira were standouts. If you miss it in Dallas, this piece will return in TBT's 2012-13 season in Fort Worth.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):