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Thursday, April 19


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#1 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:37 AM

Michaela DePrince will appear on "Dancing with the Stars."

DePrince, 17, was adopted by a New Jersey family after losing her parents at 3, and her only exposure to ballet before coming to America was a magazine photo she found in her orphanage that inspired her.



#2 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:47 AM

Previews of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in "Svengali."

Straight.com

Despite his reticence, his opening came, he says, when he read a film treatment of the Svengali story by Winnipeg filmmaker and Keyhole director Guy Maddin, who had made a film version of Godden’s other, wildly popular ballet Dracula. In Maddin’s very different version, Svengali’s desire to control the character of Trilby was a byproduct of his obsession with his own mother. Maddin wasn’t interested in collaborating on a ballet (and nothing became of the film treatment), but Godden’s imagination was off and running.


Daily News

"We really enjoy touring to British Columbia," said artistic director André Lewis, "and we have visited there consistently for the past few years with great response."

However, the 2012-13 season will see the Company heading east for the first time in a number of years.


Times Colonist

Godden did a toe-pointing exercise in one of his first classes. "I pointed my foot and [Nini] gasped and went 'Oh my god,' " said Godden. "Everyone was at my feet."

Nini told Godden that male dancers were in demand in the ballet world and encouraged him to pursue it as a career. He convinced Godden to cancel a trip to Europe that would have meant putting ballet on hold. "He said, 'If you want to see the world, join a ballet company,' " Godden said.



#3 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:48 AM

More.

Sophia Lee has been dubbed the one to watch, given her rather unorthodox and quick rise up the proverbial dance ladder.

The 19-year-old Langley native was accepted into the Royal Winnipeg Ballet Company last year, and has already been cast into several significant roles within the national dance corps, the most recent in the Vancouver premiere of Svengali at The Centre in Vancouver for the Performing Arts this weekend.



#4 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:50 AM

A review of LINES Ballet by Toba Singer in the California Literary Review.

It’s as if the dancers in this company birth their own best exponents, and of the women, Courtney Henry, a recent addition, is a fine example. All sinew and sculpted muscle, because she is tall, there is the temptation to think of her as athletic or a super-soaker of a dancer, but that would be to fall for a trompe d’oeil. While she has the strength and tenacity of an Olympic athlete, there is an artisanal quality to her dancing that beckons you to hear and see the vibrational symmetry she brings to the plaintive string melody that accompanies her solo in the second movement of Act I......



#5 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:52 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Paul Parish in The Bay Area Reporter.

San Francisco Ballet dances these three works in a way that is its own, and acceptable, but if you've seen the ballets before they look distorted. The big difference is that SFB is a man's company, where the men are expansive and the women hold back. They "lower their voices." They smile a lot, soften their shoulders, repress their wilder ideas. Whereas Balanchine's company was a woman's company – the women were strong, square-shouldered, high-energy, incisive, dramatic creatures, stars with the charisma of Katharine Hepburn, and a way like hers of being recognizably modern American women. Not all of them were as abrasive as Kate, but each was sovereign in her way.



#6 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:54 AM

Matthew Bourne's "Nutcracker!" will be performed this month.

Tchaikovsky's glorious score and Anthony Ward's delicious sets and costumes combine with sizzling choreography to create a fresh and charmingly irreverent interpretation of the traditional favourite.



#7 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 09:18 AM

A review in brief of the documentary "A Life for Ballet."

This curious tribute to the dancer-choreographer Pierre Lacotte and his muse Ghislaine Thesmar has been assembled by director Marlene Ionesco in a slapdash manner that does less than justice to her elegant subjects.

The film is made up of lengthy extracts from Lacotte's productions going back to the 1950s, interwoven with present-day glimpses of the couple.



#8 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 09:27 AM

Dancer Jack Widdowson, recovering from severe injuries after a mugging, is interviewed for television.

At the time doctors feared that he would never walk again, but he has gone on to defy the odds and is now back in training, following intensive treatment, with dreams of resuming his ballet career.

The camera crew visited the 19-year-old at Tring Park School for Performing Arts, in Hertfordshire, and made a film about his story

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#9 dirac

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:38 AM

A review of LINES Ballet by Ann Murphy in The San Jose Mercury News.

Like other abstract dancemakers, King creates images that relish shape and line and refer poetically to the human condition. But King also does what few other neoclassicists do: He calls up the history of the species and, through Africanized classical steps and atypical music, our collective African origins. "Migration" does it with quiet elegance.



#10 dirac

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:40 AM

North Carolina State Ballet presents a shortened version of "Swan Lake."

Blume is no stranger to "Swan Lake" and said she's excited about this year's production because it will mark the first time in a decade that the production will feature Act I. "My assistant director, Wei Ni, took on the challenge of Act I, which has some real challenging dances," said Blume. "Having Act I included makes this production more of a complete ballet."

Blume said Sunday's performance will include dances from the prologue of "Sleeping Beauty," which allows dancers to show off their skills a bit more.



#11 dirac

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 11:25 AM

Ballet Midwest celebrates its thirty-fifth anniversary with a full evening "Swan Lake."

"Last year when we did 'Giselle,' I saw that our corps de ballet was working so well together and were ready to take the next step and 'Swan Lake' is absolutely the hardest ballet we have in our repertoire," Ebert said.



#12 dirac

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 10:53 AM

A review of Barcelona Ballet by Tobi Tobias in her blog, "Seeing Things."

Corella has made a smart decision, I think, and, like Arthur Mitchell with Dance Theatre of Harlem and Edward Villella of Miami City Ballet (both ironically railroaded out of their tenure after they’d fulfilled their main mission), he has stamped his dancers with his own convictions: devotion to the job of dancing, accuracy of execution, unity of style as a company. At this point, Corella’s protégés are quick to define legato and staccato yet shy of revealing the emotions that might go with these modes. They are neat as can be in their footwork, but without the sharp edge that can make neatness thrilling. Their jumps and leaps are automatically buoyant—still more as if by fiat than by choice. Their turns—turns in every form imaginable—are phenomenal and enviably confident; what they might signify is still obscure. In sum, the Barcelona dancers have a long way to go, but they’re clearly on the right path.




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