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Thursday, April 12


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#1 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:41 AM

An interview with Ballet Nouveau Colorado's Brandon Freeman.

An anthropology major who planned to be a police officer upon graduation, Freeman had no dance training before he took an intro to dance class to fulfill his arts credit requirement. "I was hooked," he said of that first class. "I had always been pretty physical, playing sports in high school, so I took to it really easily."

Because it didn't matter what he got his degree in - just that he got his degree - to become a police officer, Freeman switched his major to dance. Through his time in Fort Collins, Freeman worked with many mainstays in the local dance world, including former CCB artistic director Randy Wray, who died in 1996, just weeks before Freeman was offered a contract with the renowned Oberlin Dance Company in San Francisco.



#2 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:43 AM

Q&A with Austin Scarlett of Project Runway, who is designing costumes for Aspen Santa Fe Ballet.

How did you pare down your style of big, breathtaking glamour? When it comes to ballet, it's really all about making the dancers look beautiful and really highlighting the natural physical beauty of their bodies and their movement. I really like helping to communicate a story with costume.

What will we see on stage? The colors are pale gray. For the women, there's a kind of corsety-type top, and the bottom is sort of a reinterpretation of the tutu.

#3 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:45 AM

The Mid-Ohio Valley Ballet Company presents "Cinderella."

The company's apprentice and trainee members will be joined by 40 students from the MOVB Academy of Fine Arts to perform various children's roles in the ballet.

The MOVB is a professional nonprofit dance group that performs more than 100 concerts, lecture demonstrations and Arts In Education performances each year. The company has toured extensively throughout West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Ohio since 1983 presenting specially produced one-hour versions of the current ballet through the "School Days Performing Arts Series."



#4 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:47 AM

A review of Scottish Ballet's "A Streetcar Named Desire."

The haunting final moments were perfectly portrayed by a poignant scene, which saw the company of dancers dressed in black, while [Blanche] and her first love appeared in stark contrast in white, as the lights dimmed on the tragic tale.



#5 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:48 AM

An interview with Bruce Simpson of Louisville Ballet.

What that means to Simpson is that the Louisville Ballet repertoire ranges from classics like “Sleeping Beauty” to daring new work. The artistic director considers himself responsible for every detail, from the commissioning of new choreography down to the precise pale shade of a ballerina’s shoe.

“Without that, the audience is like watching a company like a snow globe. It’s really beautiful and everything inside is gorgeous and you can’t get through that glass,” says Simpson. “I don’t want that to happen. I want dancers in the company that the minute the curtain goes up they are connecting to the audience, that there’s a vitality in their persona.”



#6 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 10:55 AM

West Australian Ballet moves into its new home.

Thanks to a $12 million fundraising campaign, the troupe has moved from its old, cramped premises at His Majesty's Theatre in the city - which it shared with the WA Opera Company - to the former WA Royal Institute and Industrial School for the Blind.

The industrial-scale building in Maylands has been a Perth icon since it was founded in 1898, and now houses three new studios, a wardrobe and production centre, gymnasium and administrative offices.


Related.

Although most of its performances will still be at His Majesty's, the revamped former Blind Institute building will house all aspects of dance, from performance, choreography and production design to an elite training school for aspiring dancers who otherwise would have to go interstate or overseas.


WAToday

The WA Ballet company and its 32 dancers moved into the historic Forrest Building which was previously home to the WA Royal Institute and Industrial School for the Blind after it was restored to resemble a New York style loft complete with a shoe room and state of the art Harlequin sprung floor designed in London.


Perth Now

Premier Colin Barnett, who officially opened the new facility today, said the project was a joint effort by the State Government, City of Bayswater, Lottereywest and the private sector.



#7 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:00 AM

A preview of this year's Laguna Dance Festival by Katherine Tulich in The Los Angeles Times.

Saturday night and Sunday afternoon's "Stars of Dance" program presents principal dancers from dance companies from around the country showcasing their best pieces. California-born Tiler Peck, New York City Ballet's youngest principal dancer, will be dancing with fellow principal dancer Joaquin De Luz. "The New York City Ballet keeps you pretty busy so it's a rare treat to be able to come to this festival and dance," said Peck, a bubbly 23-year-old.

Peck and De Luz have selected a program from the company's iconic Balanchine repertoire — his eight-minute technical tour de force, "Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux," and "Rubies" from his unique three-act ballet, "Jewels." " 'Rubies' is an amazing piece," Peck said. "It's not your typical ballerina in a tutu. It's very sultry and abstract.... It's definitely a flashy piece."



#8 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:01 AM

A review of the English National Ballet's second "Beyond Ballets Russes" program by Louise Levene in The Telegraph.


In between came the painfully short bravura party piece from Le Train Bleu, Bronislava Nijinska's send-up of Twenties beach culture. This outrageously acrobatic fragment was danced to the hilt by Muntagirov, sporting a Coco Chanel maillot and a witty blush of sunburn on chest and thighs.

Despite its shimmering Debussy score, Nijinsky's 1913 trio Jeux sank without trace after only a handful of performances and resisted all attempts at exhumation. Wayne Eagling's new version takes the choreography created by Kenneth MacMillan for Herbert Ross's Nijinsky biopic and weaves a scenario around it that conflates the original ballet's sporty, mysterious threesome with Nijinsky's creative agonies.



#9 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:06 AM

An op-ed piece on Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance by Tom Long in The Detroit News.

Though "Mavericks of American Dance" takes few risks itself — director Bob Hercules moves from this year to that year, this development to that development, in a perfectly linear manner — it leaves no doubt that the many risks the Joffrey has taken over the years have paid off. Though not always completely successful — a ballet based on Prince songs? Really? — the company has redefined ballet in a very American way.



#10 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:10 AM

Tamara Rojo will be the new artistic director of English National Ballet.

Though such opportunities crop up extremely rarely, the ballerina's youth and inexperience will raise questions. At 37, she is at her peak as a dancer, and she is a major world ballerina with an undoubted box office appeal. Not since Peter Schaufuss's stewardship of ENB in the 1980s has an active performer run the company, and with ENB's repertoire far more constricted now by the financial depression, Rojo will find herself directing and casting other dancers of her own generation who have less eminent careers. The first ENB production of Rojo's directorship will be the already announced The Sleeping Beauty, a landmark classic in which she is one of the great exemplars. It remains to be seen how this works out.



#11 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:12 AM

A review of Moscow Ballet - La Classique in "Swan Lake" by Emma Lowe in The North Devon Journal.

As the full house audience sat fidgeting, rustling packets of sweets and rummaging through their handbags, the show opened and the famous music of Tchaikovsky could be heard over a closed curtain.

Swan Lake, the world's most popular classical ballet, began with a kaleidoscope of colour, from the warm stage setting and props to the vibrant costumes.



#12 dirac

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 11:15 AM

A performance by the Royal New Zealand Ballet is interrupted by a power failure.

The afternoon performance of Angelina Ballerina's Big Audition was in the second act when suddenly the theatre's emergency lights came on - triggered by the power cut. A spokeswoman said the cut was brief but the scene affected was repeated.

The show's season is sponsored by electricity generator Meridian Energy.



#13 dirac

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:38 AM

A story on the Rojo appointment by Mark Brown in The Guardian.

"I applied for the job, I wanted it and I'm really excited," she told the Guardian. "Of course I'm a little scared but I would be crazy if I was not. It is going to be hard work."

Some ballet fans might be disappointed if they do not see so much of a prima ballerina very much at her peak but Rojo said she intended to continue dancing. "I'm not sure I will be doing less, I will be doing different probably," she said. "I will be dancing and directing."



#14 dirac

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 10:42 AM

A post on Michael Clark's "Who's Zoo?" by Andrew Boynton in The New Yorker's blog.

Back in the eighties, the British choreographer Michael Clark was known as a precocious and accomplished dancemaker, but his talent was often overshadowed by his dances’ outrageous elements. His vocabulary was ballet, but he combined it with loud rock music and in-your-face sexuality, and collaborated with artists such as Leigh Bowery and Sarah Lucas. He was ballet’s punk. In the nineties, he descended into depression and heroin addiction, and disappeared from the scene for four years. Since emerging from that dark period, Clark, though calmer, has proved once again that he is one of the most significant choreographers of the past few decades, which is undoubtedly one of the reasons that the Whitney Museum wanted him for its 2012 Biennial.




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