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Thursday, March 29


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#1 dirac

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:49 AM

Reviews of the English National Ballet's second "Beyond Ballets Russes" program.

The Telegraph

The first programme of Beyond Ballets Russes, a tribute to the incalculable influence of Diaghilev, received mixed reviews. This second programme is not perfect, and at times depends for its success upon some knowledge of the Ballets Russes legend: particularly during Wayne Eagling’s recreation of Nijinsky’s 1913 ballet Jeux. Nevertheless the evening is frequently excellent, and always interesting.


The Guardian

The last of Diaghilev's choreographers was George Balanchine, whose 1928 Apollo has become an enduring classic. For ENB's staging, Zdenek Konvalina brings a dynamic clipped clarity to the title role, but it's only Daria Klimentova (Terpsichore), who takes Stravinsky's transcendent music deep into her body, and really plays with the choreography's wit.



#2 dirac

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:51 AM

More reviews.

The Independent

It’s been subject to some upheavals. Toer van Schayk’s planned new version of Ode – a lost 1920s ballet that was groundbreaking in its use of film and lighting – had to be abandoned for personal reasons. In its place, company director Wayne Eagling staged a solo from another 1920s ballet, Le Train Bleu, and his own new version of Jeux. The cheers that greeted Eagling’s Jeux suggested personal support. He will step down as director at the end of this season, an unexpected decision that has caused controversy.


The Evening Standard

Without an original to inspire or inhibit him, English National Ballet’s artistic director Wayne Eagling has turned to a short segment made by Kenneth MacMillan for a biopic about Nijinsky, and expanded it into something that looks like an Agatha Christie whodunnit, without the dialogue. There are tennis racquets, bob-haired girls, clean-cut beaux with sinister undercurrents and a missing ball that sets everything in motion, by kickstarting the imagination of Dmitri Gruzdyev’s daydreaming choreographer. All it lacks are the French windows.



#3 dirac

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:53 AM

A review of Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance by George Heymont for The Huffington Post. Video clips.

Narrated by Mandy Patinkin, the film features interviews with such legendary dancers from the Joffrey's past as Dermot Burke, Gary Chryst, Helgi Tomasson, Christian Holder, Trinette Singleton, and Kevin Mackenzie (as well as choreographer Lar Lubovitch and dance critic Anna Kisselgoff). Paul Sutherland and Brunilda Ruiz recall what it was like to be performing in the Soviet Union in November 1963 (a month after the Joffrey became the first dance company to perform at the White House) when news reached the company that President Kennedy had been assassinated.



#4 dirac

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 04:41 PM

An interview with Dana Jacobson of New York City Ballet.

This gutsy original is a sensation just walking on stage. Next week, Howard County's sweetheart ballerina will be doing much more than walking when she performs with the internationally renowned New York City Ballet at the Kennedy Center, April 3-8. Catch this high-flying, just turned 20-year-old in the Gershwin class, "Who Cares?" on opening night, followed by three additional shows, Thursday and Friday evenings and the Saturday matinee.

"I'm excited to be dancing at the Kennedy Center, so close to home," Jacobson said by telephone from New York recently after the NYCB's tour in Germany. "It was a wonderful first European experience, and the company was very well received. In Baden-Baden, each dancer was handed a beautiful white rose during the bows."



#5 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 09:06 AM

Dennis Nahat announces his post-Ballet San Jose plans.

Now that has ended, unnecessarily ignominiously. And yet, Nahat has taken the high road, wasting no time in launching Theatre Ventures International. Its first initiative is a school, which will open Tuesday, offering classes to dancers of all ages and skill levels. The school will be housed in these newly remodeled studios at the Chinese Performing Arts of America's Arts Center on San Jose's west side near the Cupertino border, signaling Nahat's intent to continue collaborations with its executive director, Ann Woo, and Chinese cultural traditions.



#6 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 09:12 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet's Program 6 by Geri Jeter in the California Literary Review.

A one-act extract from the full-length ballet of the same name, Raymonda Act III celebrates Raymonda’s wedding — and this is one grand party. Based on the version Rudolf Nureyev choreographed for England’s Royal Ballet in 1966, it is an elegant and refined showcase that challenges the best a company has on offer. Luckily for local audiences, the best in San Francisco is at the top of the dance food chain.



#7 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 09:13 AM

A review of the English National Ballet by Sarah Frater in The Stage.

George Balanchine’s Apollo is often danced by ballet companies and needs little elaboration, except to say Daria Klimentova was a composed Terpsichore, the lead Muse who inspires the young god Apollo (an able Zdenek Konvalina who needs to tone down his waving arms). Bronislava’s Le Train bleu is never seen, but Vadim Muntagirov’s spot-on interpretation of the male solo makes you wish it was. Serge Lifar (the original Apollo) choreographed the wonderful Suite en blanc, a ballet about ballet, and again a wonderful piece that is little seen except when danced by ENB.



#8 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2012 - 09:51 AM

A review of Ballet Black by Anne Morley-Priestman for Whatsonstage.com.

Take a dash of Hogarth's The Harlot's Progress sequence. Add a soupcon of 1920s louche apache dance, season with Baron Samedi and his voodoo priestess – and then mix together with the music of Kurt Weill. You have the narrative ballet which is Christopher Hampson's Storyville. It's the main piece in Ballet Black's current touring programme and makes an effective climax to the programme.

These young dances have rock-solid technique, with good extension and accurate pointe work for the girls and sure turns and lifts from the boys. The first half of the evening has three contrasted short pieces. Sarah Kundi and Jazmon Voss are the couple whose edgy relationship is emphasised by Jonathan Watkins' choreography for Together Alone, all sharp angles and abrupt moves.



#9 dirac

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 11:07 AM

A report on the 26th annual Isadora Duncan Awards by Mary Ellen Hunt in The San Francisco Chronicle.

In the production categories, Lines Ballet's production of Alonzo King's "Scheherazade" was a big winner, taking home awards for music and visual design.

Miami City Ballet director Edward Villella was on hand to present a Sustained Achievement Award to Deborah DuBowy for her ongoing lecture series "Words on Dance."




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