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Friday, March 16


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#1 dirac

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 09:58 AM

A preview of the weekend's local ballet offerings by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

New Jersey Ballet is beating the drum for its annual fundraising gala at the New Jersey Performing Arts Center’s Prudential Hall—literally. The show features a collaboration with the West Point military band.

Meanwhile, ARB will celebrate the influence of the legendary Joffrey Ballet in a program at Raritan Valley Community College.

#2 dirac

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 10:00 AM

The current Miss America, Kirsten Haglund, talks about suffering from anorexia and her ballet training.

"I was in ballet from just 3 years old. So from a very early age, the ideal female body type was very thin," said Haglund, now a political science major at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. "That was the first image I had in my brain; I always equated beauty and worth with being skinny."

Haglund excelled in her studies while training in ballet, tap and jazz seven days a week. Her older brother had multiple learning disabilities, so she felt pressure to perform extraordinarily well.

#3 dirac

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 10:02 AM

A review of Houston Ballet's "Rock, Roll &Tutus" program by Nichelle Strzepek for CultureMap Houston.

The program, which includes the world premiere of artistic director Stanton Welch's "Tapestry" plus two ballets previously performed ("Rooster" and "Divergence"), continues with three performances Friday through Sunday.

Marquee aside, Welch planned for “Tapestry” to be the antithesis of rock and roll as he set it to Mozart‘s Violin Concerto No. 5. While it showcases the rock star qualities of violinist, Denise Tarrant, the only thing "in your face" about this ballet is the talent of the company.

#4 dirac

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 10:11 AM

A discussion of ballet partnerships in this preview of American Ballet Theatre's "Giselle" by Sid Smith in The Chicago Tribune.

"But, even so, even when you find it, you run up against obstacles," he continued, noting the subtleties of partnership casting. "In looking for sparks, you risk creating a co-dependency. You may have a Siegfried (from 'Swan Lake') who's just not a good Romeo. You may have a Giselle who's not a Swan Queen. So, sometimes, you switch, especially when partners get too comfortable."

For more than a century and a half, men and women have been pairing up for "Giselle," the venerable full-length version ABT brings Thursday through March 25 to the Auditorium Theatre. Five couples are on the lineup, ranging from such veterans as Julie Kent and Marcelo Gomes to Yuriko Kajiya and Jared Matthews, the young couple who proved such a hit here as early guest stars of the Chicago Dancing Festival and will make their debuts in the "Giselle" leading roles March 25.

#5 dirac

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 11:06 AM

Matthew Bourne's "Swan Lake" will hit cinemas in 3-D.

An early version exists on DVD, but Bourne says it was great to have another chance to film it. After all, the show has gone through at least two major reworkings since it was born in 1995. “It’s changed a lot in those years,” he says. “We came to understand what we had.”

What Bourne had was a monster hit, even though, he says, a few male audience members walked out in early years — something that never happens now. (A common misconception held by some who haven’t seen the ballet is that the swans are basically men playing women, in tutus. Not true: The men are men — hairy, bare chests and all — and female characters are played by women.)



#6 dirac

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 11:03 AM

An interview with Richard Winsor.

"I wanted to capture my role by bringing it back to its realistic nature," said Richard, "what it actually is to be this creature, this beast -- beautiful and graceful, but a quite dangerous and angry animal. We already had the template of the original story and people have known this adaptation for nearly twenty years. In Act 2, when The Prince associates with The Swan -- you're never quite sure if it's in his imagination or if it's a fantasy. I like to see it as The Prince suddenly letting himself be open to the possibility of love and freedom, and beauty. Then later, for the dark swan [The Stranger], I play him just as a normal character who comes to the ball. Maybe he's an ex-lover of The Queen. But The Prince is overcome by his fantasy and he endows the beautiful white swan onto this other dark and menacing character - which makes him even more dark and menacing as the fantasy goes on."



#7 dirac

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 11:14 AM

Australian Ballet dancers pose in the outdoors.

Three dainty figures in gossamer white danced lightly through the trees on the shores of Lake Burley Griffin yesterday. Three pairs of pretty blue eyes sparkled as the Canberra sunshine smiled on them in preparation for tonight's Telstra Ballet in the Park, the first time the Australian Ballet has performed here in seven years.




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