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Monday, March 12


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#1 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:06 AM

A review of the Joffrey Ballet by Calvin Wilson in The St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

Presented by Dance St. Louis, the company performed the work of three esteemed choreographers: William Forsythe, Christopher Wheeldon and rising star Edwaard Liang. With its contemporary feel, the program was something of a departure for the Joffrey, which in recent years has tended to be more closely associated with classical repertoire.

Forsythe’s “In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated” was an intriguing study in abstraction. To an electronic score marked by metallic hissing, the dancers performed with a bracing athleticism — figures in a stark yet kaleidoscopic landscape.



#2 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:09 AM

A review of the Royal Ballet in "Romeo and Juliet" by Mark Monahan in The Telegraph.

The Telegraph

There were times during Saturday’s matinee performance of Romeo and Juliet when Ed Watson and Melissa Hamilton looked, in the very classiest way, as if they were about to tear each other’s clothes off. Which, of course, is exactly as it should be.


The British-born duo let the Veronans’ mutual emphatuation register in what seemed an agonised reluctance to take their hands or eyes off each other. In even the briefest separations, their limbs and gaze craned out frustratedly, and the lack of self-consciousness with which they intertwined helped make Kenneth MacMillan's entire work make perfect, tragic sense.



#3 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:33 AM

Reece Clark is named Young British Dancer of the Year.

His flawless performance of one of the toughest male solos in The Sleeping Beauty convinced the panel that he deserved the £3000 prize.



#4 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:35 AM

Australian Ballet will present a new work as part of a celebration of the centenary of the city of Canberra.

Creative director Robyn Archer said the new work would be based on the ‘democratic architecture’ of Australia’s Parliament House, as the iconic building celebrates its 25th anniversary next year.



#5 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:37 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada in "The Sleeping Beauty" by John Coulbourn in The Toronto Sun.

Because, finally, it is the memories of that ball, one suspects, as much as the enduring magic that legendary dancer Rudolf Nureyev managed to pack into his homage to Marius Petipa and the glorious tradition of the Russian Imperial Ballet when he choreographed the National Ballet of Canada’s seemingly timeless production of The Sleeping Beauty that accounts for the work’s popularity with today’s audiences.



#6 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:39 AM

A review of the Paris Opera Ballet by Laura Cappelle in The Financial Times.

Stars are born in the best way imaginable at the Paris Opera: on stage. Here a full house witnessed one of those moving occasions at the Opéra Bastille, as Josua Hoffalt was promoted to the rank of étoile (Principal) at the end of La Bayadère. On cue, the director made a speech, colleagues hugged the chosen one, the audience stood and screamed, and an ocean of phones and cameras recorded every second for posterity.

Hoffalt is 27, and while nerves got to him towards the end of the ballet, as the warrior Solor he showed that he is a very welcome addition to the company’s patchy male line-up. With his light jump, boyish looks and elegant technique, he has the potential to be that rare jewel, a genuine, versatile prince. The road is long, however, and in recent years some étoiles have struggled to maintain momentum after their solemn appointments.



#7 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:42 AM

Reviews of the Eifman Ballet in "Rodin."

The New York Times

The audience at City Center cheers him on ardently, as I remember it doing in 2007. (Much Russian is spoken in the foyers and little English.) The whole Eifman phenomenon — his company is the Eifman Ballet of St. Petersburg — brings up a clash of cultures. Program notes hail him as a creator of "psychological ballet" and even as a "choreographer-philosopher"; perhaps in Russia he is taken seriously along those lines.


The New York Post

Most of the ballet is made of Rodin’s duets with Claudel or Beuret, which involve a lot of yanking around and hyper-flexibility. In a climactic trio, the two women confront each other and Rodin, grabbing at him as if he were a wishbone. Beuret wins, but Rodin ends up on the ground rolling over her, leaving her sprawled like roadkill.



#8 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:43 AM

A review of Evan McKie in "The Sleeping Beauty" by Paula Citron in The Globe and Mail.

The dancer is an all-rounder. His extra long arms ensure that his port de bras (upper body carriage) is one of lyric grace. His ballon (lightness) is like a feather. On the other hand, in the more virtuoso bits, his body snaps into a crisp attack to produce showy tricks that are downright exciting. He is also very musical. McKie lives in the music.



#9 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 10:49 AM

The current issue of Town & Country ("Alpha Girls" cover) features photographs of American Ballet Theatre dancers, including Marcelo Gomes and Misty Copeland, posing with their sponsors. Accompanying text in brief. Not available online.

#10 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:36 PM

A review of New York Theater Ballet by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

By contrast, Elena Zahlmann’s clean performance of James Waring’s piece "An Eccentric Beauty Revisited" (1972) failed to justify the work’s revival. This solo, also set to Satie, uses coquettish inflection to conjure a music-hall dancer. But the attitude behind the costume (alluding to a Nijinsky role), the purposeful mistakes and the handyman walk-on were unclear. Was this parody? Camp nostalgia?

Mr. Waring, an eccentric artist nearly forgotten, was an influential figure. It was disappointing that New York Theater Ballet — led by Diana Byer, a former member of Mr. Waring’s company — didn’t reveal why.



#11 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:38 PM

A review of the broadcast of the Bolshoi in "Le Corsaire" by Alastair Macaulay in the NYT.

The constant star of these Bolshoi broadcasts is the host, the company’s press spokeswoman Katya Novikova, who manages to be charming, attractive and extremely ballet knowledgeable in Russian, French and English, passing on just enough helpful information and conducting interviews with grace. Camerawork is generally admirable, though in the final scene we should be given a fuller view of the ship before it’s wrecked.

And the dancing? Svetlana Lunkina, as Medora, has a good stage face and lovely physique. In the last act, when she playfully disarms her infatuated Muslim admirer Seyd-Pasha, she’s engrossing. But the mind glazes over during each of her several important solos: she executes them efficiently without showing their point. As Gulnare, the ballet’s second heroine, Nina Kaptsova is less visually remarkable but, especially in Act II, much more musically alert.



#12 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:40 PM

A review of Mark Morris' company and the Eifman Ballet by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

There are essentially no carefully delineated characters in Mr. Eifman's dramatic views of personalities and society. Instead, the central figures are broad types—heartless egotists, wounded victims, jealous rivals—surrounded by one-note group work from supporting players. The overall tone is one of emphatic, declamatory presentation interwoven with busy, incidental activity.

"Rodin" ended with depictions of the title figure hammering away at a sculpture while a deranged Claudel crawled off. It turned the lives of artists and their art into simplistic anecdotes of hollow impact.



#13 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:41 PM

Cincinnati Ballet announces its 2012-13 season schedule.

Prodigal Son with Extremely Close (March 22-23, Aronoff Center): Neo-classical choreographer George Balanchine comes to Cincinnati with his rendering of the classic parable about sin, redemption and unconditional love. On the same bill, Extremely Close is Alejandro Cerrudo's thoughtful contemporary work. The performance opens on a stage of falling feathers, reflecting the delicacy and fluidity of movement, and connected throughout, punctuated by a surprising, thought-provoking ending.



#14 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 02:45 PM

Brynn Jinnett, a former dancer now running a fitness studio, talks about the role of ballet exercises in keeping fit.

Celebrities including Madonna, Katie Holmes, Charlize Theron and even Ryan Gosling have all said they use the dance technique to stay trim.

However, Brynn Jinnett, 28, says that if you are not classically trained there is no point spending your time arabesque-ing around a mirrored studio, despite the claims of gym instructors who run the classes.



#15 dirac

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 10:24 AM

A review of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre in "A Streetcar Named Desire" by Jane Vranish in The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

More surprisingly, the audience, particularly one raised on a traditional menu of ballets such as "The Nutcracker" and "Swan Lake," responded mightily to the decidedly raw emotions on display, baring sex, homosexuality and mental instability as if under a microscope.

It wasn't easy. Alfred Schnittke's score for the second act could be termed Charles Ives on steroids, an aurally shocking patchwork quilt of symphonic music, ragtime and sometimes grating improvisation. But it was brilliantly appropriate, providing an uncompromising look into Blanche's mental state and its slow deterioration.




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