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Thursday, March 1


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#1 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 10:53 AM

Reviews of Ballet du Grand Théâtre de Genève.

The Financial Times

Any number of the 19 dancers might perform solos side by side, switch parts, slip in and out of unison, dance in canon, stand on the margins as sentinels or amid the commotion as obstacles. Occasionally everyone erupted at once, in moments of tremendous inchoate beauty. The dancing did not describe the music, as Mark Morris might; rather, it wove in and out of the Bach as another fugal voice. Structure was always palpable and always surpassing understanding.


The New York Post

There’s a fine line between austere and dull, and Emanuel Gat crossed it. Switzerland’s Ballet du Grand Theatre de Geneve opened at the Joyce Tuesday with the Israeli choreographer’s “Preludes & Fugues,” a clean and carefully wrought hourlong piece. But the most dramatic moment all night was a change in lighting.

The company’s been around for a century. It’s morphed over the years from ballet — for a time, it was one of the strongest Balanchine companies in Europe — into a more contemporary group that invites guest choreographers to create new works for it, including this one.


Tablet

In recent years Théâtre de Genève, which has a century-old classical ballet heritage, has reached out to emerging contemporary choreographers. The ballet director Philippe Cohen commissioned the piece after seeing Gat’s work in Europe.

“Emanuel’s work is really pure. No big effects, just men and women dancing in this very human way,” said Cohen. “I knew it would be a challenge for my dancers. There was a great deal of improvisation, and they are used to more classical training, but it turned out just perfect. There is this beautiful flow from dancer to dancer—it is artistry defined.”



#2 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:04 AM

Ballet BC performs this month.

A year or two ago, Ballet BC was in a big financial crunch. Through some restructuring and fundraising efforts, they are getting back on track and offering contemporary ballet to the masses. That's us. Ballet, even contemporary style, may not be your thing. I get it. So why support a ballet company? Because. Here you can make your own list of reasons. You either believe in a healthy cultural sector or you don't.



#3 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:05 AM

A preview of the spring season in Vancouver ballet by Janet Smith for straight.com.

This past winter has seen a busier and more varied dance roster than usual. Don’t expect things to slow down come spring. With two major programs by Ballet British Columbia, two big-name visiting ballet companies, and an entire festival going on, you’ll have to choreograph your own moves just to catch everything.



#4 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:06 AM

An item in brief on the structure of the balcony for San Francisco Ballet's 'Romeo and Juliet.'

Eight stagehands need about an hour to build the balcony. Four stagehands guide the balcony on and off stage during the performance. Because of how high the balcony is, a railing protects the dancer from falling. The balcony also doubles as towers in the market scene.



#5 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:09 AM

City Ballet of San Diego presents an all-Balanchine program.

City Ballet has about 14 Balanchine works in its repertoire, courtesy of the George Balanchine Trust, making the company the largest presenter of Balanchine’s work in Southern California.

Before a company presents a Balanchine ballet, the trust sends out several of its répétiteurs, dancers who worked with Balanchine and stage his works around the world.



#6 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:14 AM

L'affaire Polunin gets a mention in an article on "key-man risk" in industry.

Ballet companies have developed sophisticated understudy systems because of the high levels of injury in the industry. These often involve multiple replacements for different parts across different productions. It is difficult to replicate this understudy model in other industries, partly because lower rates of injury don’t justify the expense.



#7 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:33 AM

Q&A with Joanna Berman.

Q: Twin boys must keep you pretty busy.

A: It's true you need so much energy. But, you know, my ballet training really served me well. In ballet, there were so many times when I was tired, wiped out, and it doesn't matter because you have to keep going. That quality of pushing through, even when you're really tired ... well, it comes in handy. And that's how I do it. It is true what they say: They take so much energy. Of course, now that they're older, they're also very independent, and it's so much easier than it was when they were little. They do most things for themselves and that makes all the difference. We have a lot of fun and I just can't imagine not having the boys, we're just so blessed.

#8 dirac

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 11:17 AM

The Segerstrom Center announces the lineup for its 2012-13 season.

The dance season doesn't contain anything with the feel of a grand special event such as this season's American Ballet Theatre world premiere of a new "Firebird" or the popular superstar evenings, "Reflections" and "Kings of the Dance."

"Those kinds of events depend on scheduling. They can't happen every year," Dwyer said.



#9 dirac

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 11:30 AM

Reviews of the National Ballet of Canada in "La Fille Mal Gardée."

The Toronto Sun

Which is not to say that it is all sweetness and light. Choreographed more than half a century ago, the work embraces a few social anachronisms that sit a little awkwardly on a modern stage. And while the comedic depictions of corporal punishment Ashton wove into the tale don’t render it unstageable in a modern world, they do require a second or two of adjustment in a world where such behaviour is considered largely unacceptable.

Still, when a bowl of cherries is this sweet, it’s churlish to complain about even a few pits.


The Globe and Mail

The National Ballet of Canada is dedicating Fille to the memory of former artistic director Alexander Grant, who brought the ballet into the National’s repertoire in 1976. He also created the role of Alain, which made him a star at the Royal Ballet.



#10 dirac

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 11:44 AM

A review of the Royal New Zealand Ballet by John Daly-Peoples in The National Business Review.

The three works all have connections with New York and the new artistic Director Ethan Stiefel. There also some of his colleagues from the city and his fiancé, the guest dancer Gillian Murphy. They appear to have given the company a tune up, injecting a new vigour and big city aspirations.

The opening work “28 Variations on a Theme by Paganini” based on the work by Brahms was set on a plain black stage with one crystal chandelier. Each of the short movement was like the clear beautiful jewels of the chandelier, each with different facets and dimensions.



#11 dirac

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 04:25 PM

A story on Alonzo King's LINES Ballet's quest for just the right salt.

Resin, set to Sephardic music, showcases duets and quartets of athletic dancers, and culminates in a shower of salt from above.

“The effect is that the salt reflects shards of light that falls on the dancers’ bodies and transforms the stage into this gorgeous, shimmering landscape,” says Elise Wren, associate producer with Dance Victoria. The salt, she says, will come at a cost of $400, plus another $400 to ship it to LINES’ other tour locations in Vancouver and Vernon. Though LINES will subsequently tour in the U.S. after leaving B.C., the salt won’t follow.




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