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"Pina"A documentary on Bausch by Wim Wenders


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#31 EvilNinjaX

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 08:17 AM

Here are a couple of clips from PINA. I'm not really that much for modern and particularly not interested in the "weird" high-concept stuff, but this and Dancing Dreamsreally mesmerized me (and curiously Rosas Danst Rosas, also) . It helps that Wim Wenders directed it.

Here are a couple of nice pieces, but wow, the whole thing is just fantastic.



#32 Helene

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 11:34 PM

Sadly the only extra on the Euro-region DVD is an interview in English with Wenders, which was taped in an echoed-filled room with intermittent banging and crashing noises. It would have been much better if it had been in German with English subtitles.

#33 Helene

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Posted 19 March 2012 - 07:26 PM

Here is a link to a KING-FM studio interview with Wim Wenders:

http://www.king.org/pages/12437467.php

He talks a lot about the technological challenges and how 3D advanced while he worked on the project. Steve Reeder asked him if the dancers helped him choose the pieces, and he said that he chose them himself, but a couple of dancers helped him to judge the quality of the dance, and pointed out what was wrong and what Bausch wouldn't have liked.

#34 miliosr

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 04:35 PM

If you loved this film, you might want to stop reading right now because you won't like what I have to write.

You've been warned . . .

I saw it today and it's been a long time since I've seen so much pretension and self-regard on display in one movie. I would say the movie and the people in it were ripe for the Spinal Tap treatment but how do you parody something that has already descended into unknowing self-parody? Watching the screams, convulsions and twitches of the Bausch dancers and then listening to them talk in humorless, portentous tones, I found myself alternately stifling laughter and falling asleep (during the "dance" which alternates between the company dancers, the seniors and the teenagers.)

I could go on and on and on about particular aspects of Bausch's "dance" theater that I hated but here's my number one biggest gripe: Once you strip away the novelty of the dirt or the water, what are you left with? The actual dance content is thin and repetitive. Going forward, will new dancers make any kind of difference to this material? If so, I can't imagine the difference will have anything to do with actual physical movement. Any future innovation will come from determining who is the better shrieker or who can convulse better than their neighbor.

Again, no offense intended to anyone who loved this and who loves Pina Bausch . . . but I'm not one of you.

#35 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 03:44 PM

If you loved this film, you might want to stop reading right now because you won't like what I have to write.

You've been warned . . .

I saw it today and it's been a long time since I've seen so much pretension and self-regard on display in one movie. I would say the movie and the people in it were ripe for the Spinal Tap treatment but how do you parody something that has already descended into unknowing self-parody? Watching the screams, convulsions and twitches of the Bausch dancers and then listening to them talk in humorless, portentous tones, I found myself alternately stifling laughter and falling asleep (during the "dance" which alternates between the company dancers, the seniors and the teenagers.)

I could go on and on and on about particular aspects of Bausch's "dance" theater that I hated but here's my number one biggest gripe: Once you strip away the novelty of the dirt or the water, what are you left with? The actual dance content is thin and repetitive. Going forward, will new dancers make any kind of difference to this material? If so, I can't imagine the difference will have anything to do with actual physical movement. Any future innovation will come from determining who is the better shrieker or who can convulse better than their neighbor.

Again, no offense intended to anyone who loved this and who loves Pina Bausch . . . but I'm not one of you.


What! You don't love a dancer yelling "Dies ist Kalbfleish!" while she stuffs some veal cutlets into her pointe shoes, straps 'em on, and bourées around an industrial hellhole?

I know what you mean -- although I thought of Mike Meyers' "Sprockets" rather than "Spinal Tap" ("Dis is dee part of shprockets ver vee tahnz!)-- but I like Bausch and the film anyway. Posted Image

#36 Helene

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 04:28 PM

although I thought of Mike Meyers' "Sprockets" rather than "Spinal Tap" ("Dis is dee part of shprockets ver vee tahnz!)

Oh, yes! Posted Image

#37 Amy Reusch

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 06:34 PM

But, Miliosr , what did you think of the dance cinematography?

#38 koshka

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 05:29 AM

Perhaps this comment will mark me as a hopeless philistine, but I really, really want to ride the Wuppertal monorail now, especially if it occasionally features avant garde dance.

#39 miliosr

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 04:50 PM

But, Miliosr , what did you think of the dance cinematography?

I thought Wenders & co. made that veal look every bit as beautiful as William Daniels made Garbo look in the 20s and 30s. Posted Image

Seriously, though, I can appreciate and even admire the obvious craft and skill that went into making this film. The way Wenders filmed the dances was so much better than the usual static filming of dance we get in most dance DVDs. That being said, I feel like it was craftmanship and skill in the service of a diseased repertory. No matter how much artistry you bring to the filming of the patient, it doesn't make the patient any less ill.

#40 Helene

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Posted 12 July 2012 - 11:10 PM

Selections from "Pina" will be shown as part of the "Dancing Movies" program in this year's Chicago Dancing Festival. The program plays on Tuesday, 21 August at noon at the Museum of Contemporary Art:

http://chicagodancin...ing-movies.aspx


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