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Wednesday, February 29


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#1 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:15 AM

Previews of Armitage Gone! Dance.

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

In years of study to learn dancing on pointe and technical virtuosity, you seek great control over your body so you can do anything you want," Armitage says. "We do off balance, very sensual happenings with funky, democratic rock 'n' roll spirit to combine with traditional beauty of ballet. I believe artists should create something new that you can't see on television. It's thrilling. because it's new ideas. My job is to be innovative."


The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

"A lot of it really is autobiographical," she says. "It's me asking questions about the meaning of my life and what is important and what are my values and how are cultures changing and how do we adapt."
Armitage Gone! Dance will bring this diversity Saturday to the Byham Theater, Downtown, when it makes its local premiere as part of the Pittsburgh Dance Council's 2011-12 season.



#2 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:17 AM

A review of "Kings of the Dance: Opus 3" by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

The other rewarding aspect—in keeping with the promotion of these dancers as memorable personalities and performers—came after the program's seven numbers ended and the beaming men stood, shoulder-to-shoulder, variously linking hands and arms during their curtain calls. In full stage light and left to their own devices, the five men were revealed as distinct individuals, full of the radiance and charisma so often derailed by the dances made for "Opus 3."



#3 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:19 AM

Q&A with Joanna Berman.

In the past, you have said you were not interested in choreographing. Has this changed since you have experienced setting ballets for other choreographers?

My answer today is the same as before: I’m still not interested in it. Sometimes, though, I hear a piece of music I love and maybe I want to do something, but it is not my passion.

Being a regisseur resonates almost as much as dancing for me. I love it. And it doesn’t have the same pressures as being a performer. I still get to interact with dancers and using my body. And to get the choreographer’s point across.



#4 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:21 AM

Diablo Ballet performs this weekend.

#5 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:25 AM

Columbia Classical Ballet concludes its season with "Le Corsaire."

But Pavlovich adds his own signature to it, with updated technique, humor and acting. The performances feature three male performers in strong roles: Christopher Miro, Ivan Popov and Brooklyn Mack. Mack is now an award-winning company dancer with the Washington Ballet who first studied with Pavlovich.

“The ballet was created so long ago that I felt I was going to give a little more technical spice to it, because today the boys can really jump more, turn more and do more tricks,” Pavlovich says. “They have incredible acting ability and incredible technical skills. You can do more with them.”




#6 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:30 AM

A preview of local dance events by Victor Swoboda in The Montreal Gazette.

For its historic first tour of Canada next February, the storied National Ballet of China will offer Zhang Yimou's Raise the Red Lantern, a neoclassical ballet based on his 1991 film of the same name. Xin Peng Wang's choreography juxtaposes lyricism and acrobatic power.

More familiar to Montreal audiences will be a double bill from the company repertory in March 2013. TooT is a fun concoction with a serious purpose by Dutch choreographer Didy Veldman, who is currently busy creating The Little Prince for the company......



#7 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:33 AM

A preview of Ballet West's 2012-13 season by Kathy Adams in The Salt Lake Tribune.


Choosing the highlight of the company’s 2012-2013 season is tricky. Topping the list would be the world premiere of Val Caniparoli’s dance interpretation of Shirley Jackson’s classic short story, "The Lottery." A commissioned musical score by Robert Moran and secretive rehearsals are keeping dance followers guessing.

"The Lottery," which was originally scheduled for the 2011-2012 season and temporarily put on hold due to financial cutbacks, follows the dark narrative familiar to many readers from high school literature classes. Although Artistic Director Adam Sklute is playing it close to the vest, the ballet will include — spoiler alert — an element of surprise involving chance and performer-audience interactions.



#8 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:34 AM

Dance Theatre of Harlem holds a gala in honor of Harry Belafonte.

"He completely embodies our sense of purpose," Virginia Johnson, DTH’s artistic director, told HuffPost BlackVoices. "As an activist in the civil rights movement he used his talents to change people's lives, which is exactly what Dance Theatre of Harlem does."

The nearly 250 gala attendees were not only there to pay homage to Belafonte and take in a beautiful performance by the Dance Theatre Harlem Ensemble and students from the Dance Theatre of Harlem School -- they also got an opportunity to celebrate of the rebirth of DTH's professional company.



#9 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:36 AM

A review of the Royal New Zealand Ballet by Kate Hannah for Thread.

Who knew what to expect from the second piece – described in the programme as "athletic and rigorous." From the beginning, Larry Keigwin's Final Dress enthralled: the curtain opened to backstage lay bare, dancers in leotards and/or semi-nude. Drawn into the dancers' world, this was like an artistic interpretation of The Secret Lives of Dancers: their beauty, grace, strength, and skill up front and central. The audience was delighted – and a standing ovation was well deserved. Lucy Balfour was delightful in her vintage dress from Hunters and Collectors in Cuba St, drawing us in with her smile and those amazing arms.

This was a hard act to follow – and while 'Who Cares?' by the two American greats Balanchine and Gershwin was beautifully executed and again displayed Gillian Murphy's enormous talent, we kept harking back to the astonishing, moving, sexiness of Final Dress.



#10 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:49 AM

A review of Ballet Arizona by Deborah Jowitt for her blog, "DanceBeat."

It’s also apparent that Andersen knows music and chooses it well. When choreographing to Mozart’s variations, however, he tends to wed every step to the rhythm proper of the musical passage—rarely fitting in more or fewer steps than there are notes in a measure. That may have been a deliberate choice in the sweetly plain first section, but it carries over into the ensuing quintet to the Andante from Schubert’s Octet in F major and the section set to Benjamin Britten’s Prelude and Fugue for 18-Part String Orchestra (all heard in recordings at the Joyce). In the second half of the piece, when the choreography grapples with Stravinsky’s complexities, Play becomes more lively interchange between music and dancing.



#11 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 10:58 AM

A preview of the Mississippi Metropolitan Ballet in "Cinderella." Photo gallery.

Previous productions were mounted in spring 2006 and 2008, with the 2008 performances drawing 1,500 to 1,750 - the largest house ever for the company, artistic director Jennifer Beasley said. This time out, she added parts to the ballet's ballroom scene, to accommodate the performing company's 60 dancers. The story's mix of fairy tale, dance and comic theater (the dependably hilarious Wicked Stepmother and Ugly Stepsisters ) make it a winner with viewers.



#12 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:01 AM

A review of the Ballet du Grand Théâtre de Genève by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.
 

When they are not dancing, they watch one another from the sidelines, and sometimes they pause right in the middle of the action to stare. "Stop, look, listen" could be their motto.

That’s when it’s not "Stop, drop and roll." Much of Mr. Gat’s choreography skims low along the floor. The body’s weight swings and the limbs follow through, the momentum winding and unwinding. Extremities tend to flick. The classically trained Ballet Genève dancers, wonderfully unmannered, look entirely at home in this style. (Nathanaël Marie is particularly supple in a sliding solo.)



#13 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:17 AM

A review of Varley O'Connor's "The Master's Muse," with biographical notes on Tanaquil Le Clercq by Joel Lobenthal for Capital.

The Master’s Muse is most interesting when O’Connor does try to get inside Le Clercq’s head. It’s not only that there’s a certain degree of plausibility to what she posits, it’s that the very act of trying to shed light on something that is unknowable commands admiration. O’Connor’s writing is at its best here, too, and it’s very readable throughout.

Yes, Le Clercq was the master’s muse, but she was so much more as well. I would have liked to see a wider lens trained on her life than O’Connor applies, a less-exclusive concentration on Balanchine. Yet I was glad, as I read the novel, that this extraordinary artist and woman had stimulated yet another imaginative act of creation.



#14 dirac

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 11:20 AM

Ballet West announces the lineup for its 2012-13 season.


Choosing the highlight of the company's 2012-2013 season is tricky. Topping the list would be the world premiere of Val Caniparoli's dance interpretation of Shirley Jackson's classic short story, "The Lottery." A commissioned musical score by Robert Moran and secretive rehearsals are keeping dance followers guessing.

"The Lottery," which was originally scheduled for the 2011-2012 season and temporarily put on hold due to financial cutbacks, follows the dark narrative familiar to many readers from high school literature classes. Although Artistic Director Adam Sklute is playing it close to the vest, the ballet will include — spoiler alert — an element of surprise involving chance and performer-audience interactions.



#15 dirac

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Posted 02 March 2012 - 11:26 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada in "La Fille Mal Gardee" by Michael Crabb in The Toronto Star.

Wednesday’s opening principal leads featured seasoned performers Sonia Rodriguez and Piotr Stanczyk, the former suitably spirited, in temperament and dancing, and the latter robustly, yearningly ardent. Both danced with just the spontaneity needed for roles that are as technically challenging as those for any ballet prince and princess yet must be pitched more colloquially.

Young corps member Skylar Campbell, replacing injured first soloist Robert Stephen as the evening’s Alain, found the right balance between broad humour and tender pathos, turning what is effectively the story’s anti-hero into the most endearing character on stage.




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