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Tuesday, February 28


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#1 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:18 AM

A review of "Kings of Dance: Opus 3" by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

In the cheapest number of the evening, “Labyrinth of Solitude,” Vasiliev milks the crowd, glancing over his shoulder with a hurt expression and inserting aerial stunts seemingly at will. Although his fans cheered, this dance by Patrick de Bana is hammy and disjointed.

What a shame the “Kings” have come to this. Past episodes in this series have featured a stimulating combination of premieres and revivals—who could forget Nikolai Tsiskaridze’s “Carmen,” or Angel Corella in “The Lesson”?



#2 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:20 AM

A review of Ballet Arizona by Margaret Fuhrer for The Huffington Post.

After intermission, things take a turn for the delightful. The second half of the ballet is set to Stravinsky (Suite no. 2 and Pulcinella Suite), and his spiky rhythms enliven the whole company. There are a few hammy false notes -- I could do without the group of jester-like nyuk-nyuk guys -- but the choreography is engaging and musically acute. Sometimes, it's finer than that. In one fascinating section, Andersen has five couples dance a pas de deux in unison. We see them act out the sustained drama of courtship -- will they or won't they? -- together. What would have been intimate moments become public events.

Andersen is a fine craftsman, if not a magician. And his dancers -- particularly Magnicaballi and the polished Paola Hartley -- are appealing performers, if not world-class artists. The whole group seems determined to do things right. Play isn't groundbreaking stuff, but it shows a commitment to real, difficult, substantial dancing. That's not always cool. But it is always honorable.



#3 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:24 AM

An interview with Cuban ballet teacher Elena Cangas,who's in South Africa for the Cape Town International Ballet Competition.

For Cangas, the biggest problem facing local ballet students is the lack of a similar structure – a school that children can attend from a young age which would immerse them in an environment of dance, by which she means four to five hours of ballet tuition in addition to school studies. “The most important thing is to organise the teaching of ballet in South Africa,” she said.

“In Cuba they start from the age of 10 or 11. That’s when they go into the school and their whole envi-ronment is centred on dance, which they decide to make a career....."



#4 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:30 AM

Las Vegas looks to raise its profile as a place for the arts.

In addition to hosting touring musicians, artists, and shows (this year’s roster includes cellist Yo-Yo Ma, author David Sedaris, the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and Broadway hits “Wicked,” “Mary Poppins,” and “The Color Purple,” notes The Huffington Post), The Smith Center will rescue the Las Vegas Philharmonic and Nevada Ballet Theatre from their current ill-fated digs in a campus amphitheater with no acoustics to its name and a casino, respectively. It will also provide classrooms to initiate resident students into the arts.

The recent culture push crests the city’s nasty housing collapse and high unemployment numbers (among the worst in the nation, The Huffington Post reports). With the high foreclosure rates, housing became more affordable for local artists. Prices for studio apartments dipped as low as $250 per month, The Huffington Post writes, and since 2007, the number of arts galleries in the city have more than tripled going from 30 to 144 (based on city records).



#5 dirac

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 11:35 AM

The jeweler and former dancer Jamie Wolf confirms that Benjamin Millepied and Natalie Portman have made it legal.

Picking Wolf to create the wedding rings was an easy choice for the stars - she danced with Millepied at the New York City Ballet and befriended Portman on the set of Black Swan, in which she played a dancer.

She is also the same jeweller the Frenchman approached to create Portman's engagement ring.



#6 dirac

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 11:23 AM

A cocktail party is held in honor of the Houston Ballet Barre association.

Gorgeous Houston Ballet dancers and the official opening of Miu Miu in The Galleria.

Welcome to Monday night in Houston.



#7 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 10:56 AM

An interview with Emanuel Gat.

“It resembles a little bit the scientific process,” Gat said of his creative process, putting himself firmly in the latter camp. “You have some experiments you want to investigate, but you don’t know what the finished product will be. … I have no idea of the outcome before I create it,” he said, adding, “What happens at the end is you discover a choreographic structure rather than create one out of nothing.”



#8 dirac

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 11:35 AM

A piece on what scientists can learn from ballet and dance by Sylvie Leotin for The Huffington Post.

As professionals, dancers and scientists also exhibit many common qualities. Both share a desire for challenges, an ethic of hard work, a drive to transcend limits, and the perseverance to see projects through despite setbacks - and sometimes literally pain. Both put in the ten thousand hours required to master their skills, and make progress through perspiration and iterations; rewarded by occasional bursts of inspiration. Dancers practice the same steps over and over; the same way passionate scientists relentlessly repeat and tweak experiments until they yield the results they thrive to achieve.




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