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Thursday, February 23


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#1 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:32 AM

Li Cunxin will take over as artistic director of Queensland Ballet.

“It's also a homecoming of sorts - my wife Mary McKendry is from Queensland and we're looking forward to making it our home. Queensland's cultural industries have experienced phenomenal growth over the last five years and I'm honoured to be joining the Company at this time. I have so many ideas - I can't wait to get started.”

Li will begin programming the 2013 season when he joins the Company in July. He will be the fifth Artistic Director in the Company's 52 year history and the first curatorial Artistic Director.



#2 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:35 AM

Mikhail Baryshnikov shows his dance photography.

Ballet icon Mikhail Baryshnikov will be on hand at a Thursday night reception for a solo photography exhibit, “Dance This Way,” at the Gary Nader Art Centre in Wynwood (62 N.E. 27th St., Miami). The show includes the public debut of photos highlighting ballet, ethnic dance, hip-hop and other forms of contemporary dance.


Related article.

The show's title, Baryshnikov says, is meant to be both commanding and descriptive. He wants the dancers to move toward his camera, and he wants to show what he sees in their dances.

"I'm interested in focusing on body parts, the movements which really one cannot notice in the audience," says Baryshnikov, 64.



#3 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:37 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Paul Parish in The Bay Area Reporter.

Actually, Program 2 is an all-gay evening, with an all-male centerpiece by Morris, who is now I'd say the greatest choreographer alive. Beauxis a pastorale for nine adorable men camouflaged as gay boys (pink-camo unitards by Isaac Mizrahi). Last Friday night, the gay presence in the house was almost overwhelming. Donna Sachet, with a fabulous red shawl and a very short, very tight red cocktail dress, was only the most spectacular of the many B.A.R. folk on hand; and the lobby was full of darling young people who looked liked they'd styled their hair with....



#4 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:51 AM

Sergei Polunin gets a new visa.

A source said the new visa was not tied to any specific company.



#5 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:54 AM

A review of Les Ballets de Monte Carlo by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

Typically, Mr. Maillot shows little interest in ballet steps of any finesse or variety. Mostly, his women work on pointe in ways that give their stances and locomotion added sharpness and elongation, but little in the way of intricate changes of direction, position or rhythm. Here, his most prominent female dancer, Bernice Coppieters, had a central role. Her initial solo section at times presented her in fleet arabesque moments that suggest a darting sandpiper; leading the ballet's closing moments, Ms. Coppieters found herself joined by three men who interacted with her in choreography that repeated many of her solo's moves.



#6 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:57 AM

Reviews of the Birmingham Royal Ballet in "Hobson's Choice."

The Stage

Robert Parker has made the role his own and he is beautifully paired with Elisha Willis as the ramrod-backed, buttoned-up Maggie. It’s like watching ice melt as her overtures towards him become more fluid and confident. This isn’t a spectacular ballet but it’s one of the most exuberant, so real and vibrant and telling such a detailed story that it’s deliciously like watching a silent film, especially in the studied antics of the drunken Henry Hobson (David Morse).


Express & Star

After more than 20 years this delightful rom-com ballet still has the power to delight, and is on track to become a true classic in the footsteps of its inspiration: David Lean’s 1954 movie of the play starring Charles Laughton and John Mills.


The Arts Desk

It's a rare ballet where the culmination you hope for is that the young guy gets to take over the business (an idea for a Murdoch ballet there, one day?). David Bintley's Hobson's Choice is surely his very best work, unmitigated pleasure for the spectator - an innocent, beautifully executed period comedy full of atmosphere, good characters, a perfect emotional arc and a perfectly brilliant musical score. None of this is simple to carry off.



#7 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 10:59 AM

A story on Taylor Benjamin, currently performing in "Ballet Boyz - the Talent," in his home town paper.

Taylor didn't set out to be a dancer. He decided to study performing arts at North Devon College because he wanted to be an actor. Movement classes were just a compulsory part of the course.

"I'd never danced before and I was a bit reluctant at first, thinking, 'Ah movement classes, how rubbish is that?'. Then I ended up really liking it and in my second year I took AS Dance. I then decided in that one year that's what I wanted to do. Helen helped me get my audition together."

#8 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:02 AM

An interview with Lola de Avila, currently staging "Giselle" for Oregon Ballet Theatre, by Bob Hicks in The Oregonian.

De Avila, who began her career in Spain and is now associate director of the San Francisco Ballet School, danced Giselle in her own performing days, during which she partnered with such legends as Rudolf Nureyev and Erik Bruhn. Yet despite her deep familiarity with ballet's history, how things should be for today seems very much at the forefront of her mind.

"It's different," she says. "We used to dance different. I mean, Giselle is Giselle, she will always be Giselle. But the technique has improved so much. Technique is moving on. We know better; we teach better."



#9 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:04 AM

A review of Ballet Arizona by Apollinaire Scherr in The Financial Times.

An old-fashioned love of ballet – its orderly rules and the nifty ways you can rearrange them – is the company’s strength and also, it turns out, its weakness. Whenever Andersen went comic or casual, whenever a move required dramatic shading or pedestrian plainness, the dancers fell short. Any movement language other than ballet-for-its-own-sake seemed gibberish to them. Or perhaps the lapses in sense arose from the choreography. In any case, I could not tell whether the pastoral’s five men were friends or rivals. And in an all-female ode to Balanchine’s modernist “leotard” ballets, problems of tone – to titter or not? – marred the striking configurations of bodies and limbs.



#10 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 11:49 AM

New Jersey Ballet performs this weekend.

Following the enthusiastic reception for his "Tamoia" last spring, Teixeira comes back with "Retorno," a ballet that will present New Jersey Ballet's pre-professional Junior Company in featured roles alongside four of NJB's professional artists. "Retorno" is an abstract work in which Teixeira envisions the bodies writing a new language of reawakening and rebirth.



#11 dirac

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 12:28 PM

Reviews of Ballet Arizona.

The New York Times


For all of its plenitude and facility, the bulk of the choreography does seem familiar, stuck somewhere between derivative and original. The example of Balanchine is continually apparent — as is some of Mr. Andersen’s Danish heritage — and the creativity of Mr. Andersen, an apt pupil, emerges in bright details rather than bold or breathtaking new ideas.

The more contemporary duet in underwear that closes the first act with its floor-bound entwining and emotive, acrobatic partnering and clichéd choice of Arvo Pärt music, contains the most awkwardness. The double duet that precedes it, also set to Pärt, is much more powerful for its plainness and restraint. Similarly the dancers seem least comfortable when asked to stray from classicism and Balanchine’s extensions of it.


The Financial Times

An old-fashioned love of ballet – its orderly rules and the nifty ways you can rearrange them – is the company’s strength and also, it turns out, its weakness. Whenever Andersen went comic or casual, whenever a move required dramatic shading or pedestrian plainness, the dancers fell short. Any movement language other than ballet-for-its-own-sake seemed gibberish to them. Or perhaps the lapses in sense arose from the choreography. In any case, I could not tell whether the pastoral’s five men were friends or rivals. And in an all-female ode to Balanchine’s modernist “leotard” ballets, problems of tone – to titter or not? – marred the striking configurations of bodies and limbs.




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