Jump to content


Saturday, February 18


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,081 posts

Posted 18 February 2012 - 11:50 AM

Reviews of San Francisco Ballet.

The San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Ballet choreographer-in-residence Yuri Possokhov wastes little time with niceties in his newest ballet, "Francesca da Rimini," which the company premiered on Thursday night at the War Memorial Opera House. Red-clad furies swirl around the lovers' triangle of Maria Kochetkova, Joan Boada and Taras Domitro, the maw of Dante's inferno opens to disgorge three menacing shadows, and in the first 15 seconds you know there will be no happy ending here.


Examiner.com


The world premiere of Mark Morris' Beaux is an impossible dream-come-true – beginning with the choreographer's choice of music, Bohuslav Martinu's Concerto for Harpsichord composed in 1935. Featuring the gentlemen of San Francisco Ballet, there has never been a more colorful and appealing opportunity to gather the Company's male pulchritude together in a show of unity, strength, form, beauty, and an occasional cavorting romp. Harpsichord soloist Bradley Morris was given as rare an opportunity – an 18th Century-style instrument brought to the fore in a 20th Century composition never intended for a 21st Century Classical Ballet featuring an all-male cast clad in form-fitting rainbow camouflage and marking its debut in the City by the Bay. Way to go, beaux!




#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,081 posts

Posted 18 February 2012 - 11:52 AM

Ballet Renaissance of Detroit faces financial challenges.

And with arts funding at a critical low, the 15-year-old dance company is finding itself at a crossroads: continuing to teach students while struggling to maintain financial viability.

As part of the effort to meet the fiscal challenge, Furnish and Kokoszka took jobs teaching ballet in Colorado. They returned to Detroit in December for the company's performance on Noel Night at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History.



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,081 posts

Posted 18 February 2012 - 11:54 AM

A review of Miami City Ballet in 'Giselle' by Jordan Levin in The Miami Herald. Photo gallery.

Jennifer Kronenberg and Carlos Guerra were in their element in the leading roles of Giselle, the dance-loving village girl who dies of a broken heart after being jilted by Albrecht. The nobleman disguises his position to dally with her, and regrets it deeply after Giselle's spirit proves her love by saving him from the ghostly, vengeful Wilis in the second act.

Jeanette Delgado made a powerful impression in her debut as Myrtha, the Queen of the Wilis, making up for her lack of height — Myrtha is traditionally danced by a tall ballerina — with an utterly commanding presence and impeccably sculpted dancing.



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,081 posts

Posted 19 February 2012 - 04:32 PM

A review of Alberta Ballet in "Cinderella" by Salena Kitteringham in The Edmonton Journal.

There’s also a fine line between a smart and thrifty production design and a show that looks like it was done on a dime. Guillaume Lord’s ballroom set design looks great when the curtain rises on Act 2, with black pillars and chandeliers simply rendered with flat papercutting-inspired silhouettes. The dark backdrop pieces nicely set off the contrasting bright punches of colour in the dancers’ gowns, but once the lights come up stronger, the pillars are visibly bubbling at the top and not laying flat, making the production look low budget rather than stylishly frugal.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,081 posts

Posted 19 February 2012 - 04:37 PM

A review of Kansas City Ballet in "Romeo and Juliet" by Libby Hanssen in The Kansas City Star.

Andersen, artistic director of Ballet Arizona, choreographed this version of the popular ballet for his company in 2005. The Kansas City Ballet, a similarly sized company, first performed the production in 2008. Students from the Kansas City Ballet School bolstered the 25-member company.

The magnificent trompe l’oiel backdrops and period design by Alain Vaës evoked a highly romanticized version of old world Verona inside the Muriel Kauffman Theatre. Vaës, along with Henry Haymann, also designed the costumes, which ranged from the courtiers’ velvety, glittering opulence to the peasants’ simple garb. Scenery and costumes for this production were rented from the Boston Ballet. Lighting design was by Michael Korsch.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):