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Friday, February 17


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#1 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:02 PM

A review of Carolina Ballet by Roy C. Dicks in The News & Observer.

Its title, "Balanchine Rarities," references three pieces that open the program. George Balanchine, probably the 20th century's greatest choreographer, molded his creations to his dancers' strengths, including brilliantly talented André Eglevsky. His daughter, Marina, now stages many Balanchine works associated with her father. Although Carolina Ballet dancers are thoroughly grounded in Balanchine technique, Marina Eglevsky's work with them has raised the company's bar of excellence.

Two of these pieces are homages to 19th century choreographer Marius Petipa, requiring absolute control and crystalline precision. In "Minkus Pas de Trois," Randi Osetek and Lara O'Brien beamed confidence and showmanship, building to several breath-taking moments, while Richard Krusch gave his finest performance to date, wowing with his beats and turns.



#2 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:06 PM

More on the resignations from the board of Charleston Ballet Theatre.

A former board member who spoke on condition of anonymity called the ballet 'a very hand-to-mouth operation," referred to concerns about the way material for ballet productions has been secured and presented, and confirmed that board members Patrick, Wamsley, Cece Stricklin, Mark Fava, Al Votaw, Chris Handal, and Kit Whitley had stepped down.

Last summer, the Charleston Ballet Theatre became embroiled in two licensing disputes over the use of proprietary material. The Kylian Foundation in the Netherlands accused the company of improper use of choreography by Jiri Kylian in recent productions. The licensing fee was paid in full, resolving the issue.



#3 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:13 PM

A story on the Houston Ballet Ball by Molly Glentzer in The Houston Chronicle.

Coolest guy in the room, though, was 2011 America's Got Talent winner Landau Eugene Murphy, Jr., in dreadlocks, who got everyone dancing with his spot-on Frank Sinatra voice.

The night, its live auction of serious playcations and the Art for Arts Sake silent auction grossed $1.4 million - a record for the ballet, which will be back onstage Feb. 23 with Stanton Welch's Cinderella.



#4 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:16 PM

Two reviews of Milwaukee Ballet.

Third Coast Digest

The odd assortment of music — Offenbach, Ros, Polley, Vivaldi, Strauss, Mozart, Shostakovich, Bach, Ponchielli, some of it in popsy arrangements — is equally disorienting. The dancing relates to it in various ways, but references to tango keep popping up. Tango can be combat, and it is here. A battle of the sexes swings between cold war and hot war throughout. The women flirt to draw them men in, then punish them for their impertinence in a variety of ways, including kicks in the shins.


The Journal Sentinel

Each of the pieces played to the strengths and versatility of the ballet's dancers, mixing the vocabularies of classical and modern dance with elements of character development and theatrical sensibilities.One early fall aside, the dancers delivered all three works with precision, energy and an expressive theatrical freedom that connected the performers to their audience and effectively sold each piece.

The evening opened with Brock Clawson's thoughtful "Crossing Ashland," danced on a bare, scrim-backed stage and danced to recorded music by John Adams and others.



#5 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:17 PM

A review of Suzanne Farrell Ballet. (Subscription only)

#6 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:21 PM

An obituary for Zina Bethune by Dennis Hevesi in The New York Times.

Ms. Bethune was 7 when she began studying dance in 1952 at George Balanchine’s School of American Ballet in Manhattan. By 1955 she was performing in Balanchine’s "Nutcracker." At 14, she was a member of the New York City Ballet.

Her parallel acting career started when she was 6 with a small role in the Off Broadway play "Monday’s Heroes." She later appeared on soap operas, including "Guiding Light" and "Young Dr. Malone," and earned more than two dozen acting credits, among them roles as President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s daughter, Anna, in the 1960 film "Sunrise at Campobello," and as an abandoned adolescent who lives by her wits in the 1958 "Kraft Television Theater" production of Tennessee Williams’s one-act play "This Property Is Condemned."



#7 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:35 PM

Jonathan Jordan and Sonia Kharatian of the Washington Ballet offer tips on how to have fun going out to dance.

What it's all about: "Dance, to me, is about having fun and expressing enjoyment," Jordan said. "If you're going out to dance, you should go out with the idea that you're going to get your blood moving and have a good time."

How does it feel: Kharatian swears that, contrary to what you may believe, dance is not about coordination or flexibility or grace. "It's all about attitude," she said. "You want to feel confident and relaxed at the same time, because you've got to be relaxed to feel the music. Feel the rhythm, in your body. Be loose."


Video clip.

#8 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:37 PM

A review of Boston Ballet by Angelique Nehmzow and Grace Young in the MIT campus paper.


Whilst each ballet is emotionally moving and thought-provoking on its own, the combination of the three takes the audience on an exciting and bewitching journey. The pieces balance and enhance one another, and maintain a carefully calculated tension throughout. Their order and execution deftly achieve the transition from the haunting and classical to the captivating and modern.

Simply Sublime is, quite simply, sublime.



#9 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 12:38 PM

A report in brief on Riolama Lorenzo's farewell performances.

She caught the sweet melancholy of Wainwright’s country-inflected lyricism – theatrically balanced to perfection against Veyette’s super-charged masculinity – and the romantic eloquence of 19th century Russian music in “Keep,” exquisitely matched with Hench’s princely carriage. While it’s true that others dancers will rise in the ranks to take Lorenzo’s place, it’s also true that her stunning beauty, immaculate technique and transcendent artistry will never be replaced.



#10 dirac

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 11:55 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Cuba in "Don Quixote" by Janet Smith for straight.com.


nspired by the 1869 ballet by Marius Petipa and set to Ludwig Minkus’s rollicking score, Don Quixote only loosely follows Cervantes’s wayward knight and his klutzy assistant Sancho Panza—although legendary Cuban choreographer Alicia Alonso does give their characters more heft in her version. The story really centres around Kitri, whose father forbids her from marrying the lowly barber Basilio, instead taking a dowry from the French nobleman Camacho. The young lovers eventually outwit their elders, but really, it’s all an excuse for the grandeur of twirling Gypsy dances, wild displays of balletic bullfighters jetting high through the air, and in the stunning final act, some of the most technically challenging grandstanding you are ever going to see on-stage.



#11 dirac

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 11:57 AM

Oregon Ballet Theatre announces the lineup for its 2012-13 season.

Taken together -- albeit on different programs in the five-show season -- they represent something of the range and philosophy of the company, which continues to stress the importance of classical rigor in both technique and aesthetic, yet also to stretch out from that foundation in ways that speak more directly to contemporary tastes.

Among the other likely highlights of next season are a collaboration with the Portland Art Museum, a full evening of works by the legendary George Balanchine (OBT’s patron saint, stylistically speaking), plus, of course, the company’s popular version of Balanchine’s winter holiday chestnut, “The Nutcracker.”



#12 dirac

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 04:43 PM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Rita Felciano for danceviewtimes.

While it is disconcerting to see dancers being tools for an apparently extraneous purpose, it is also fascinating to observe their handling of it. The small pauses, the glances, the taking of a breath, the pushing and yielding and the gusto of a stride are individualized. "Chroma" overtly puts the physics of the body on to the stage but now it also succeeded in becoming emotionally involving.

Wheeldon's dense "Number Nine" -- it's his ninth piece for SFB -- has only one major flaw: Michael Torke's music runs on empty -- full speed to be sure, but it's still vacuous. The irony is that the score is the driving mechanism of a work that so intriguingly looks at Ballet's relationship between the Corps and the Soloists. Wheeldon set the piece on four color-coded couples and a yellow-clad ensemble of sixteen, often used in identical duets. They invade the stage like storms.



#13 dirac

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 12:10 PM

A review of Les Ballets de Monte Carlo by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times.

Les Ballets de Monte Carlo returned to New York on Wednesday evening with a pair of dances by its choreographer and director, Jean-Christophe Maillot. The group, making its Joyce Theater debut, began with “Altro Canto I,” a 2006 work set to a collage of Monteverdi, Biagio Marini and Giovanni Girolamo Kapsberger. The shiny flair of Mr. Lagerfeld was evident in gold costumes that paired straight-legged jeans with bustiers, or short poof skirts with tank tops. Gender played no factor in who wore the skirts, hinting at the masculine and the feminine in us all. It was stale from the start.



#14 dirac

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Posted 22 February 2012 - 11:23 AM

A preview of Washington Ballet's Tharp offerings by Rebecca J. Ritzel in Washington CityPaper.

...“Nine Sinatra Songs” headlines the Kennedy Center run, but the troupe’s first all-Tharp program also includes a reprise of “Push Comes to Shove” and the company premiere of “Surfer at the Styx.” To prepare for “Sinatra Songs,” the ladies need to spend some serious time primping—costumes are by Oscar de la Renta—and the guys need to hit the gym. Tharp’s choreography takes “Fly Me to the Moon” literally. Well, not Newt Gingrich-literally, but the piece is all about men lifting the ladies aloft. Male footwork is more important in “Push Comes to Shove,” a piece Tharp created in 1976 for a recently defected Mikhail Baryshnikov....


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