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Sunday, February 12


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#1 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 09:15 AM

Boston Ballet opened a triple bill of works by Fokine, Balanchine and Wheeldon:

http://www.enterpris...enturies?zc_p=1

Whoever said ballet was dying wasn’t watching.



#2 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 09:20 AM

A review of Ballet Idaho by Dana Oland:

http://www.idahostat...-fiery-and.html

Overall, the choreography was a bit simplistic, especially in the group scenes that packed a lot of people onto the compact stage. Crowding became a theme of the night, confirming that Ballet Idaho has outgrown this venue. Executive director Paul Kaine has said the company will move its repertory concerts to the Morrison Center next season.



#3 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 09:29 AM

Roslyn Sulcas reviews the Joffrey Ballet for the New York Times:

http://www.nytimes.c...gors-infra.html

On Wednesday the Joffrey Ballet begins a two-week run, at the Auditorium Theater in Chicago, of “Infra,” a work created by Mr. McGregor for the Royal Ballet in 2008 and not performed by any other troupe since then. It shares a triple bill with William Forsythe’s “In the Middle, Somewhat Elevated” and Christopher Wheeldon’s “After the Rain,” making for a resolutely contemporary program.[size=3][font=Calibri]

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#4 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 09:32 AM

An interview with the chief choreographer of the Georgian National Ballet:

http://georgiandaily...22135&Itemid=86


The combination of lively music, shows of strength, tornado-fast spins, jumps, swords, shields and daggers for male dancers, matched with the gliding and elegant movements of female performers in vibrantly colored costumes make Georgian dance a dazzling spectacle for audiences.

"I would dare to say that other national dance groups in the world don't present such diversity on the stage," said Iliko Sukhishvili Jr., the founder's grandson and current chief choreographer of the troupe.



#5 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 09:38 AM

Richmond Ballet performed Frederic Franklin's staging of Coppelia:

http://www2.timesdis...lia-ar-1682308/

The ballet was restaged by the company's artistic associate and ballet master Malcolm Burn, who is celebrating his 25th anniversary with Richmond Ballet. Burn performed the non-dancing character role of the mysterious and somewhat diabolical Dr. Coppélius, a crafter of life-size, animated dolls.



#6 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 01:32 PM

A review of the Atlanta Ballet in "The Princess and the Goblin" by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

She has retained the royal heroine, Irene, as well as the goblin foes and their sensitive feet. This Irene still gets help from a commoner boy, Curdie, and supernatural assistance from her great-great-grandmother. But, unlike MacDonald's Irene, here she also has two younger sisters, who are abducted by the goblins, along with other children. Since Irene's father, King Papa, is too self-absorbed to notice, it is up to Irene and Curdie to rescue them.

In MacDonald's story the great-great grandmother spins an invisible thread; in Ms. Tharp's, she simply spins. Which is to say that Ms. Tharp, more than just altering the plot, has translated the story into ballet terms. As Richard Burke's score skillfully stitches together Schubert compositions and his own modern music, Ms. Tharp defies, teases and embraces 19th-century ballet conventions.



#7 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 10:25 AM

A version of "Eugene Onegin" once thought lost is performed at Princeton. Thanks to innopac for sending in the link!

The show, in this case, is "Eugene Onegin" in an adaptation that was originally to have been mounted at Tairov's Chamber Theater in Moscow for the Pushkin centennial in 1937. That never happened because the play was banned and abandoned. It has now taken form at Princeton, however, where an ambitious project highlights two aspects of the work in two different productions.

On Thursday a so-called "music-and-dance-forward version" was presented by the Princeton Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Rossen Milanov, with choreography by Sydney Schiff. Performed one time only at Princeton's stately Richardson Auditorium, this concert resurrected all of the music that Prokofiev wrote for "Onegin" 75 years ago.




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