Jump to content


Wednesday, February 1


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 10:53 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet's "Onegin" by Geri Jeter in the California Literary Review.

On opening night, the dancing was glorious, the entire company handling Cranko’s technically demanding choreography with attack and precision. The strength of any ballet company lies not in its principal dancers and soloists, but in its corps. And here SF Ballet has it nailed. They were simply amazing. And Cranko’s choreography gives them plenty of room to shine. One astonishing moment came when the corps couples move from diagonal to diagonal in a breathtaking series of supported jetés performed in unison at almost unbelievable speed. And yet, they still managed to be real people. Neat.



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:11 AM

A review of New York City Ballet by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

Christopher Wheeldon’s “Les Carillons,” for New York City Ballet, does not approach Georges Bizet’s “L’Arlésienne” Suites 1 and 2 with anything like a perfect fit, however.

Spottily inspired and confused in places, the premiere is one of those royal flops that later become useful as a source for spare parts. Still, it’s good to find Wheeldon back at City Ballet, where he belongs. Saturday’s program reconfirmed his gifts with the reprise of the brilliant “Polyphonia”—marred by an onstage injury to ballerina Jennie Somogyi—and by the company premiere of “DGV: danse à grande vitesse.”



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:12 AM

A preview of Ballet Nouveau Colorado's "Love in the Digital Age."

The Valentine's show has become a bit of a tradition for BNC, but "Love in the Digital Age" is a brand-new collaboration with the digital artist and programmer Kris Collins, who has worked for artists such as the Black Eyed Peas.

Collins' projection and light display is designed specifically for the show, and uses Xbox Kinect technology to make the display react to the movements of the dancers.



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:14 AM

Columbia City Ballet presents "Romeo and Juliet."

Wilkes-Davis, on the other hand, steps into a role that more closely resembles his own life. He’s blessed with the strength required of the ballet’s male lead. But he’s also a natural Romeo who is sweet-tempered and romantic, Starrett says. In fact, he’s so romantic that late last year he proposed to his girlfriend, company dancer Anna Porter, onstage during a dress rehearsal for The Nutcracker.

The choreography for City Ballet’s Romeo & Juliet is largely based on that of John Cranko. Cranko’s adaptation for Germany’s Stuttgart Ballet in 1969 is perhaps the most well known in the U.S., though Starrett and ballet mistress Patricia Miller have re-staged it.



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:15 AM

Q&A with Robert Carter of Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo.

HuffPost Arts: What inspired you to join the Trocks?
Robert Carter: When I attended my first performance of Les Ballets Trockadero, I saw that there was a group of guys that did what I wanted to do, which was dance en pointe. I knew that one day I wanted to join them. I received a great deal of support, which was uncommon for most boys, and which was a great advantage for me when I did join.

HuffPost Arts: One of the Trock's greatest feats is exposing humorous displays of femininity in ballet, which really stand out when its being performed by men. Are you trying to exaggerate these movements or accurately relay them?
Robert Carter: A little of both depending on the context. Certain roles or pieces require a little more exaggeration or sometimes understatement to convey a message to the audience.



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:20 AM

Sergei Polunin may have to leave the UK.

The Daily Mail

But plans for a further appearance at a gala evening being staged by the English National Ballet (ENB) at the Coliseum next month are now in doubt unless Polunin, touted as the most promising ballet dancer of his generation, can further extend his work permit.

Wayne Eagling, artistic director of the ENB, has I learn, been working behind the scenes to throw Polunin a lifeline.



The Telegraph

The Ukrainian-born star, 22, automatically lost the right to work in the country following his surprise resignation.

It is understood that the Royal Ballet, founded in 1931 and whose notable dancers have included Dame Margot Fonteyn and Darcey Bussell, is legally required to alert the UK Border Agency as soon as any of its foreign dancers resign.



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:23 AM

Dorothea Tanning has died at age 101.

In 1941, Ms. Tanning joined the Julien Levy gallery, a stronghold of Surrealism at the time, and she fell in with the group, meeting artists like Breton and Tanguy, whose ghostly color palette and amorphous shapes were an influence on some of her work of the time. She also met artist Max Ernst, then married to dealer Peggy Guggenheim, and the two fell in love, moving to Arizona together in the mid 1940s. The pair married in a joint ceremony with Man Ray and Juliet Browne, and moved to France in the 1950s, where they worked until 1976, when Ernst died.

As her career progressed, Ms. Tanning was commissioned to make sets and costumes for the ballets of George Balanchine and other performances and public venues. The Drawing Center presented a retrospective of this body of work in 2010, marking the centennial of her birth.



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:25 AM

Anastasia Volochkova takes it all off in the snow.

The busty star - once sacked by Bolshoi bosses for being too heavy for male dancers to lift - posted pictures of herself with a towel covering her finer points after her icy romp.

"After the show I just felt like cooling off and dived into the fluffy snowy banks," she wrote on her blog.



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:28 AM

An interview with Amy Seiwert.

With the Cline ballet, Seiwert moved another step away from her natural abstract inclinations to a narrative. The images morphed into characters, which led to kinetic relationships or stories, which would have pleased her grandmother.

"I showed my grandmother a piece that was weird and abstract and she said, ‘Don’t you think you should be more like Michael?’" Seiwert recalls. "When I told Michael, he asked, ‘Doesn’t she know you are doing pretty well just being yourself?’"



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:29 AM

An update on the post-renovation Bolshoi Theater.

It was a palpable sign that after a $700-million restoration Moscow's theatrical jewel is struggling to live up to a centuries-old reputation as a bastion of Russian culture.

In the three months since its reopening, performers have criticized the renovation, audiences booed its operatic premiere and complained about ticket prices, two Bolshoi ballet stars decamped to a rival theater and other dancers suffered injuries.




#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:32 AM

Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre expands its school and headquarters.

New sprung floors were installed in all five studios. Sprung floors have the ability to absorb shock. When the dancers land, the floor moves a little with the dancer, whose backs, hips and other joints don't take as much pounding. Sprung floors can help extended the careers of dancers by promoting safety and decreasing the risk of student injuries.

During the third and final phase of the expansion, $3 million is proposed for construction of a new building on the site that will add three dance studios, Ferris said.



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 03:51 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Claudia La Rocco in The New York Times.

New York City Ballet’s program Tuesday night at the David H. Koch Theater opened with two Balanchine works that show the extremes of these aspects: "Concerto Barocco" (1941) for the ineffable, and "Tarantella" (1964), the whirligig. This perhaps sounds like a rather contradictory arrangement. But the second half of the evening, Jerome Robbins’s "In G Major" (1975) and Balanchine’s "Firebird" (1949) — implicitly and explicitly narrative works that both move between social and internal worlds — offered a chance to think about how these two qualities live within all of us as essential, paradoxical impulses: to live for and with others in the everyday hustle and bustle ("Here we are!") and to live apart, drawn by a grander unknown.



#13 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 03:52 PM

Michael Crabb writes on Rudi van Dantzig's Canada connections for The National Post.

Even before that, ballet school alumna Mavis Staines, now the school’s artistic director, had left the National Ballet of Canada to dance in Amsterdam. She was the first in a long and continuing line of graduates to join the Dutch National Ballet. “He was a truly inspiring artistic leader,” recalls Staines.

Van Dantzig also forged a strong connection with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, staging Four Last Songs for the company in 1980 and his full-length Romeo and Juliet the following year, later televised by CBC with the luminous Evelyn Hart as the title heroine. Both works have become Royal Winnipeg Ballet staples.



#14 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 03:55 PM

An item on Jennie Somogyi's injury by Joan Acocella in The New Yorker's blog.

In opera, there’s always somebody in a suit coming out in front of the curtain to say that the tenor has a sore throat tonight and begs your indulgence. I wish the same thing would happen in the case of ballet injuries—that someone from management would come out and tell us that, yes, what you thought you saw did in fact happen, and that the dancer was with a doctor. And, if she was replaced, the name of the person who stepped in. That way, you could settle it in your mind, and talk about it at intermission.



#15 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 01 February 2012 - 03:57 PM

Russell Maliphant talks about Rodin with Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

His curiosity about the world outside ballet grew even stronger when SWRB began to focus on runs of 19th-century classics such as Swan Lake. Frustrated by the lack of creativity, Maliphant joined the small independent ballet company Dance Advance. If giving up the security of a big institution felt like a risky move, it was nothing compared to his next project. Lloyd Newson, the brilliantly angry young man of modern dance and the director of DV8, had noticed Maliphant, and tempted him to perform in 1988's riveting Dead Dreams of Monochrome Men.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):