Natalia

Mar. 11, 2012 Le Corsaire (Live in Cinemas)

51 posts in this topic

Marga, were the spoken words during the interpolated "Little Corsaire" variation? I read that Medora shouts "Au bord!" (or a Russian version of that phrase) at the end of that variation.

Vocalization during "Little Corsaire" would certainly fit in with the choreography, but it wasn't then that she shouted out. She was in a tutu, held up high, and triumphantly called out what did sound similar to what your wrote, although I would have understood "Au bord", so it wasn't that.

I think it was at the end of Act I when Conrad's pirates "kidnapped" Medora, rescuing her from the Pasha, whereupon they all triumphantly left for the grotto.

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In the spot we were discussing, she wasn't dressed in a tutu -- she was dressed as a pirate and held the megaphone to the side when she made her quick shout. It sounded like Russian to me, but I assumed it was the Russian version of "au bord".

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"Na abordage!" is what she shouts in Russian. Same meaning.

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Can someone (I would join) EDUCATE Alistair Macaulay that it was BURLAKA's & Ratmansky's REVIVAL of PETIPA and not "Alexei Ratmansky's" as he names the article and writes in it.

Truth be told, He contributed, yes he did, But it was also BURLAKA. Shame on Mr. New York Times critic.

http://www.nytimes.c...lastairmacaulay

ANd the truth is - from the Bolshoi's site

Хореография Мариуса Петипа

Постановка и новая хореография -

Алексей Ратманский, Юрий Бурлака

http://www.bolshoi.r...rformances/198/

Choreography: Marius Petipa

Revival: Alexei Ratmansky, Yuri Burlaka

New Choreography: Alexei Ratmansky

http://www.bolshoi.r...rformances/198/

The English and Russian version present contributions of Burlaka and Ratmansky slightly differently (Russian states - Revival and new choreography - both names.....)

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"Na abordage!" is what she shouts in Russian. Same meaning.

Thank you! (I knew it had more syllables than "au bord" :))

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Marga, were the spoken words during the interpolated "Little Corsaire" variation? I read that Medora shouts "Au bord!" (or a Russian version of that phrase) at the end of that variation.

Vocalization during "Little Corsaire" would certainly fit in with the choreography, but it wasn't then that she shouted out. She was in a tutu, held up high, and triumphantly called out what did sound similar to what your wrote, although I would have understood "Au bord", so it wasn't that.

I think it was at the end of Act I when Conrad's pirates "kidnapped" Medora, rescuing her from the Pasha, whereupon they all triumphantly left for the grotto.

If she was held up high and it wasn't what I was thinking, maybe she was shouting at the male dancer not to drop her in Russian! LOL LOL LOL Maybe she felt his hands slipping!!! LOL

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I wondered, too, what Medora was shouting out in Russian when my husband and I saw this Corsaire production at the Kennedy Center several years ago. She was yelling something like ". . . back to the ship".

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Youtube user Ewaasia has been uploading chunks of the broadcasted performance for those wanting to re-live memories (or watch for the first time!).

I just love the tutus in this production (and other Bolshoi reconstructions). They are so flattering and luscious looking, plus they capture movement wonderfully. Much better than those flat pancaked things.

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I just love the tutus in this production (and other Bolshoi reconstructions). They are so flattering and luscious looking, plus they capture movement wonderfully. Much better than those flat pancaked things.

I have mixed feelings, Ksk01, about those "new-old" tutus they're using for the reconstructions. Sometimes they're H-U-G-E-(as those used in Raymonda)-and they tend to get very droppy in the front, thus partially blocking sometimes the whole leg of the ballerina from her knees up. I much prefer those "rose" types of tutus seen by mid-century dancers-(like this one worn by Mme. Makarova)-, which are very high, to waist level, vs. the reconstructed hip level ones used nowadays-(as seen here by Novikova)-and by the XIX dancers-(Vaganova here). With the sort ones you can see the whole leg...(sometimes, I admit, they were so high you could see the ruffled underpants of the ballerina.. happy.png )

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I just love the tutus in this production (and other Bolshoi reconstructions). They are so flattering and luscious looking, plus they capture movement wonderfully. Much better than those flat pancaked things.

I have mixed feelings, Ksk01, about those "new-old" tutus they're using for the reconstructions. Sometimes they're H-U-G-E-(as those used in Raymonda)-and they tend to get very droppy in the front, thus partially blocking sometimes the whole leg of the ballerina from her knees up. I much prefer those "rose" types of tutus seen by mid-century dancers-(like this one worn by Mme. Makarova)-, which are very high, to waist level, vs. the reconstructed hip level ones used nowadays-(as seen here by Novikova)-and by the XIX dancers-(Vaganova here). With the sort ones you can see the whole leg...(sometimes, I admit, they were so high you could see the ruffled underpants of the ballerina.. happy.png )

I thought you didn't like seeing crotches, Cristian! LOL

I think I like it to be somewhere in between the two extremes you showed in the pictures. I like to see the whole leg but not quite as short as in the Makarova picture you showed us!

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I just love the tutus in this production (and other Bolshoi reconstructions). They are so flattering and luscious looking, plus they capture movement wonderfully. Much better than those flat pancaked things.
I have mixed feelings, Ksk01, about those "new-old" tutus they're using for the reconstructions. Sometimes they're H-U-G-E-(as those used in Raymonda)-and they tend to get very droppy in the front, thus partially blocking sometimes the whole leg of the ballerina from her knees up. I much prefer those "rose" types of tutus seen by mid-century dancers-(like this one worn by Mme. Makarova)-, which are very high, to waist level, vs. the reconstructed hip level ones used nowadays-(as seen here by Novikova)-and by the XIX dancers-(Vaganova here). With the sort ones you can see the whole leg...(sometimes, I admit, they were so high you could see the ruffled underpants of the ballerina.. happy.png )

I think I like it to be somewhere in between the two extremes you showed in the pictures. I like to see the whole leg but not quite as short as in the Makarova picture you showed us!

I don't mind being big, as long as they're high. I like this one worn by Mme. Dudinskaya.

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That looks like a rose!!! Lovely!

Ok, "Raymonda lover"...pop quizz...do you identify that very role and moment in that particular ballet in Dudinskaya's photo...? happy.png

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Isn't that when she enters and picks up flowers off the floor? I love Raymonda and have watched every commercial version available and some that are not commercial, but it has been months now.

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Okay, watching the Bolshoi's Corsaire online, and the production is gorgeous, but the men's wigs are hideous. Mullets are never a good choice! The mullets have GOT TO GO!!!!

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Just finished watching Le Corsaire online, and I enjoyed it, although I have never seen that final "marriage" scene with the wedding and Gulnare and Medora switch identities to marry the Pasha. I don't think the Mariinsky or ABT or anyone stages that scene, and the commentator said that the scene's dancing was all new and staged in the style of the time. So is this scene a total invention, or was it created because the original version had that scene but the choreography is lost? Does anyone know?

Gorgeous production. The Jardin Anime makes the entire thing worthwhile!!!

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Mullets are never a good choice!

Oh, I had a GORGEUS mullet when I was a teen...! Front part with hairspray and everything...happy.png

but back to Le Corsair...

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Just say, "No!" to mullets!!!!

That wig maker for the Bolshoi must hate men! LOL LOL LOL

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If I understood the intermission interview correctly, the costumes were based on Petipa-era drawings, and I thought the wigs were, too.

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Just finished watching Le Corsaire online...

Hunh? The whole 3h35m? I'm envious! All I'm finding today are seven clips on YouTube. Please do explain, Bart Birdsall.

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About two weeks ago the Bolshoi started to provide english subtitles for their "a Ticket to the Bolshoi" program. The latest episode on their youtube channel has a feature on backstage at the Corsaire - same cast as the cinema transmission. Also featured are Makvala Kasrashvili's anniversary gala and Evgenia Obraztsova's debut in "la Sylphide" with Slava Lopatkin.

The two other episodes with subtitles are:

April 11 - Olga Smirnova, Vladislav Lantratov and Anna Tikhomirova debut in "La Bayadere"; Deputy Director Anton Getman and his departments; soprano Elena Zelenskaya talking about herself.

April 16- the premiere of "Der Rosenkavalier"; a tour around the reconstructed Bolshoi Theatre; ballet coach Nina Semizorova; ballet dancer Denis Medvedev

It's a great move - It makes such a difference to understand what the dancers and staff are saying in the interviews.

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I couldn't find the subtitles. Is there a trick?

Thanks,

Macnel

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How do i get the subtitles? Couldn't access them. Thanks

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Look at the menu bar on the bottom of the youtube picture screen. If you see CC click on that. If you don't see CC there are no captions.

You can't see the CC in this post until you click on the video.

A Ticket to Bolshoi #208 (sub) / Билет в Большой №208

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