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Monday, January 30


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#1 dirac

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:32 AM

A story on an injury sustained by Jennie Somogyi in The Wall Street Journal. (Subscription only)

Principal dancer Jennie Somogyi apparently tore her right achilles tendon while performing a duet in "Polyphonia," according to City Ballet spokesman Rob Daniels, who said Ms. Somogyi was having an MRI Sunday to ...



#2 dirac

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:33 AM

Sergei Polunin says he'll dance again.

His fellow Ukranian Putrov, who also walked out on the Royal Ballet 18 months ago, further cemented hopes that he would dance again. Asked if the two men would ever dance together Putrov replied: "He's a very close friend, so I don't see why not."
It comes after speculation that Polunin, who became the Royal Ballet's youngest ever principal dancer at 19, and has been compared to Rudolf Nureyev, was planning to become a tattoo artist at the parlour he half-owns in Holloway.



#3 dirac

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:35 AM

A preview of Pacific Northwest Ballet's "Don Quixote" by Philippa Kiraly for The SunBreak.

“I loved the fact that Ratmansky wanted actors to do Don Quixote himself and Sancho Panza,” says Boal. Ratmansky used a comedy duo in Amsterdam, but Boal knew personally a Seattle actor, famous for his TV and movie roles, and now deeply involved in working to encourage film arts here. Tom Skerritt, he thought, would be the perfect fit, even the physical resemblance. (Skerritt is quite tall, thin, craggy-faced and even the right age, not far off 80.)



#4 dirac

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:40 AM

Reviews of "Men in Motion" at Sadler's Wells.

The Independent

Putrov, himself a former Royal Ballet star, has gathered a group of guest artists in party pieces and his own new ballet Ithaka. Though Polunin was there, some of his guest stars were kept away by visa troubles, leading to an adjusted programme.

Polunin danced Narcisse, a solo created by Bolshoi choreographer Kasian Goleizovsky. He stalks on stage in tights and body glitter, and reminds his audience what the fuss has been about.


The Evening Standard

The earliest piece on show was Fokine's 1911 Le Spectre de la Rose, in which a pink-petalled Igor Kolb gave us pot pourri when what we really wanted was incense and opium. None of the ballets, though, could match Russell Maliphant's contemporary dance, Afterlight, which allowed the remarkable, mystically rotating Daniel Proietto to illuminate all the shades of masculinity from urchin to angel.


The Financial Times

It might have seemed – like Lymeswold cheese or the nylon shirt – a Good Idea at the time. But further consideration about an evening to celebrate male dancing, produced by a new boy at the game, and with a strong reliance upon Russian performers, should have counselled a certain caution. Ivan Putrov intended his Men in Motion (which turned up in Rosebery Avenue as the week ended) to explore the possibilities of men dancing. What we saw was pauperish, and less than convincing.



#5 dirac

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:54 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet in "Onegin" by Mary Ellen Hunt in The San Francisco Chronicle.

"Now that is ballet" was no doubt the first thought as audiences rose to their feet at the conclusion of John Cranko's "Onegin," which San Francisco Ballet performed for the first time this weekend at the War Memorial Opera House. Remarkably imaginative and dramatically coherent, Cranko's masterpiece still has the power to transport and astonish the audience 45 years after this version premiered.




#6 dirac

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 11:55 AM

The Grand Rapids Ballet Junior Company presents "Snow White."

In the tale of “Snow White,” the evil queen poisons Snow White with an apple. But in the Brothers Grimm story, the evil queen tries twice before that, first with a corset, then with a comb.

Those extra vignettes provide extra fodder for a choreographer to create a comb dance with girls playing outside and a corset dance with seamstresses sewing garments.



#7 dirac

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 12:08 PM

Jennie Somogyi is out for the season.

It was the second major injury for Ms. Somogyi since early 2004, when she tore a tendon in her left foot during a show. She battled back then, undergoing reconstructive surgery and extensive physical therapy before returning to the stage after 18 months. Rob Daniels, a City Ballet spokesman, said Ms. Somogyi would have surgery on Tuesday.



#8 dirac

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 12:09 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Jocelyn Noveck for AP.

First up was a world premiere, "Les Carillons," set to Georges Bizet's "L'Arlesienne" suites. A romantic and colorful romp for 20 dancers, the work featured some of the company's top ballerinas, including the veteran Wendy Whelan and the newer generation of stars, Sara Mearns and Tiler Peck. With its 19th-century music but contemporary choreographic flourishes, the work felt, appealingly, old and new at the same time.

If "Les Carillons" (the title refers to a set of bells) was well received, it still felt a little like a work in progress, without the tightness and punch of the 2001 "Polyphonia," one of Wheeldon's best-loved works. Alas, on Saturday this terrific ballet, beautifully performed, was also an occasion for sadness.



#9 dirac

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 12:17 PM

A review of Miami City Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

The smart rhythmic timing, the easy command of off-balance dancing and the unforced high energy are other features that come from Balanchine, but the bodies’ rapid changeability of focus is a striking legacy of Mr. Scarlett’s British training. He knows the secret of dance lies in contrasts. Within the opening minutes he opposes stillness and movement, horizontal and vertical lines, staccato and legato dynamics, closed and open body shapes. Some phrases pulsate with dancers rhythmically arriving in one position after another, while others show dancers working their way through a movement, taking their torsos or arms or legs gradually from one position to another and so emphasizing the drama of the current of motion.



#10 dirac

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 11:37 AM

A review of New York City Ballet by Tobi Tobias for her blog, "Seeing Things."

As happens so often in a Wheeldon ballet, Wendy Whelan’s incandescent presence drives other figures into the shadows and she mesmerizes the audience simply by becoming a hypersensitive body folding and unfolding. Here, after this is accomplished, a crowd returns to surround her and she threads her way through this human maze like a lost maiden in a legend or, perhaps, a fragile young woman—you read about them in the newspapers—unable to cope with the rigors of contemporary urban life. Sara Mearns makes just the right foil for her. She’s all womanly power, boldly devouring space, laying claim to it as her own. Astutely partnered by Craig Hall, who is not intimidated by her largesse of body and spirit, she’s also spectacular on her own. And so it goes, but sooner rather than later, the viewer will start to wonder what point the piece is trying to make. One among such spectators, I concluded unhappily that there was no discernable point.




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