dirac

Favorite holiday movie?

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On ‎12‎/‎5‎/‎2015 at 6:15 PM, dirac said:

Also, are there favorite moments in your favorite holiday movies?

This isn't a moment per se but I love how artfully Holiday Inn sustains the illusion that the inn is a real place in snowy Connecticut. And then (as John Meuller pointed out in his comprehensive book on Fred Astaire's films, Astaire Dancing) the film shatters that carefully crafted illusion at the end and reveals that the inn was truly a set all along. It should bother me but it doesn't.

 

I bought the DVD of Good News (the 1947 version) to watch on Christmas Eve or Christmas night. It's not a Christmas film but it was released on December 26, 1947 so it kinda-sorta counts.

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I always wondered how Crosby could make money on a place that was hardly ever open.

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On 12/19/2016 at 9:17 AM, dirac said:

I always wondered how Crosby could make money on a place that was hardly ever open.

 

Snark!

 

I went back and looked at this thread, and wanted to say I'm still a George C Scott Christmas Carol girl.

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"Christmas in Connecticut" is my favorite Christmas movie (watched it earlier today on TCM).  On December 23, I attended a sing-along screening of 1954's "White Christmas" (Crosby, the brilliant Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney, Vera-Ellen, and George Chakiris easily found in two dancing numbers), shown in Disney Hall, Los Angeles Music Center, which was an utter joy on the HUGE screen. 

 

Happy Holidays and all the best to Ballertalert readers and posters in the New Year! 

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Thanks, Josette. Vera-Ellen is great in "White Christmas."

 

Watching another unconventional Christmas flick, "Die Hard," and missing Alan Rickman. What an awful year. It can't end too soon.

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On ‎12‎/‎19‎/‎2016 at 11:17 AM, dirac said:

I always wondered how Crosby could make money on a place that was hardly ever open.

Especially since, on the nights the inn was open, Crosby employed what looked like 500 people!

 

Watched Good News today, which M-G-M released this day (the 26th) in 1947. Good times, thanks largely to the cast (June Allyson, Peter Lawford, Joan McCracken, Ray McDonald and Mel Torme) and the songs. (Too bad this was Ray McDonald's last feature at M-G-M and Joan McCracken's only feature at Metro.)

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Watched the George C. Scott version of "A Christmas Carol" on Christmas afternoon with the extended family.  There are so many wonderful stage actors in this production.  As a child it completely spooked me.  As an adult I just love the beautiful Dickensian language.  He was an erudite spokesman for the pushback against the early industrial age's  lack of humanity. 

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Thanks, Jayne. I've never seen Scott's Scrooge. I'll have to look for it (next year :)).

 

"A Christmas Carol" like a lot of Dickens, has some darker elements that can really scare a child. Not only are there Marley and the three ghosts, but Dickens has phantoms howling outside Scrooge's window, the Ghost of Christmas Present has those starving kids in his train, and then there are the thieves who go through Scrooge's stuff after his "death." And the Cratchit family is in really dire straits, with the father about to lose his job. Dickens doesn't water down any of this.

 

 

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1 hour ago, dirac said:

Thanks, Jayne. I've never seen Scott's Scrooge. I'll have to look for it (next year :)).

 

"A Christmas Carol" like a lot of Dickens, has some darker elements that can really scare a child. Not only are there Marley and the three ghosts, but Dickens has phantoms howling outside Scrooge's window, the Ghost of Christmas Present has those starving kids in his train, and then there are the thieves who go through Scrooge's stuff after his "death." And the Cratchit family is in really dire straits, with the father about to lose his job. Dickens doesn't water down any of this.

 

 

 

It's my favorite version (well, except for Mr Magoo) -- Scott is very direct, and the painful parts are very well done.

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Your endorsement make me look forward to it even more, sandik. I once played the part in a drama club that was short of suitable males, so I take a proprietary interest. :)

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I can understand your interest -- a great part!

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Well, it was junior high. Scott came to me for insights, but I was too busy to see him.

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He managed to muddle along without your help...

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