Jump to content


Saturday, November 19


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:07 PM

Appalachian Ballet presents its Nutcracker.

The 40th anniversary production includes 80 performers who dance and act to music played by the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra. The company is one of four of the Southeast Regional Ballet Association's 20 troupes to perform to live music, says Ballet Artistic Director Amy Moore Morton. "It's so worth it. It puts us in that next bracket."

Guest artist and Australian dancer Aaron Smyth dances the princely role of the Cavalier; the 20-year-old performed that role last year in the company's Maryville shows. Guest artist Kylie Morton reprises her role as the Sugar Plum Fairy. Laura Morton repeats her part as the child Clara. Maryville College junior Caroline Angilim is the Snow Queen.

#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:09 PM

A review of LINES Ballet by Alice Kaderlan for seattlepi.com.

Since then, I’ve seen the company several other times and on each occasion, the impression has been the same – a beautiful troupe of dancers without the choreography equal to their talent. That remains my view based on the company’s latest outing in Seattle this weekend at Meany Hall.

The two pieces on this program are remarkably similar in style and mood despite the fact that their subjects, as much as their titles convey subject matter, are very different. The fact that King created both in 2009 may explain the similarities but in any event a more diverse program would have provided far more substance to sustain a full evening.

#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:10 PM

A preview of November dance events by Mike Dunham in The Anchorage Daily News.

This year's offering, a production from Eugene (Ore.) Ballet Company with dancers from Alaska Dance Theatre and a live orchestra of local musicians, will take place at 2 and 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and at 1 and 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 27, in Atwood Concert Hall. Tickets are $19-$41 at centertix.net.

Meanwhile, there's more old school ballet in a (relatively) new school format. The Fathom folks are presenting a big screen HD performance of "Sleeping Beauty," also by Tchaikovsky, in what's billed as a "live" broadcast from Moscow's Bolshoi Ballet.

#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:29 PM

Adam Sklute gives a lecture-demonstration.

Speaking at the 4th Annual Regional Undergraduate Student Philosophical Conference at Salt Lake Community College, Sklute said these innovators — Vaslav Nijinsky, George Balanchine, William Forsythe and Jiri Kylian — "not only redefined ballet but they reinvented the language of ballet. And they did it in the context of great social upheavals that were happening throughout the 20th century."

Titled "The Radical in 20th Century Ballet," the lecture included film clips, both archival and from Ballet West performances, which Sklute introduced, to show how these dance masters invigorated ballet by their creative developments. The artistic director also showed the contrasting styles through short excerpts of dances performed by Deanna Karlheim and Lucas Horns, members of the Ballet West Academy.

#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:31 PM

A review of Sarasota Ballet by Carrie Seidman in The Herald-Tribune.

Whichever of the two performances of “The Great Masters” by the Sarasota Ballet at the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall you might have seen on Friday, you were treated to the same things – brilliant choreography, skilled and well-rehearsed dancing and the luxury of live music provided by the Sarasota Orchestra, under the baton of Emil de Cou.

But with one cast for the matinee and another for the evening, there was a distinctly different flavor depending on when you went. I saw both and it made me realize how the same pieces – in this case, George Balanchine’s “Diamonds” and Frederick Ashton’s “The Two Pigeons” – differ significantly depending on the dancers’ individual strengths and interpretations.

#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:33 PM

Muriel Maffre appears in "A Soldier's Tale" in Berkeley.

A Soldier’s Tale is worth taking in just to watch Muriel Maffre handle the puppet. We’re used to seeing puppeteers as intrinsically separate from the characters they manipulate, which is perhaps why most puppets seem so two-dimensional. Here, Maffre moves with the soldier on stage, wearing a slate grey dress that matches his soldier’s grays, both becoming him and remaining separate enough to treat him exquisite tenderness. Both she and L. Peter Callender become the parents of this character, who is profoundly wounded in spirit after a Faustian bargain in which he suffers “so much remorse, so much chagrin, for a lousy two-bit violin.”

#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:34 PM

A review of the Moscow Ballet's Great Russian Nutcracker by Katie Dravenstott for TheaterJones.

Seeing The Nutcracker always gets me into the holiday spirit and Friday night's performance of the Moscow Ballet's Great Russian Nutcracker at Southern Methodist University's McFarlin Auditorium was no exception. The production is choreographed by Stanislav Vlasov of the Bolshoi Theatre (and uses canned music).

Aided by 94 students from 27 dance studios in North Texas, the Moscow Ballet's Great Russian Nutcracker tells the tale of a young girl, Masha (Karyna Shatkovskaya) and her beloved present, a Nutcracker. When she falls asleep she dreams of a land filled with mice, snowflakes, angels, a Snow Queen, a Rat King and of course, her Nutcracker Prince (Vladimir Tkachenko).

#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:38 PM

An interview with Charles Askegard and Michele Wiles of Ballet Next by Pia Catton in The Wall Street Journal.

For Ms. Wiles, 31 years old, and Mr. Askegard, 42, the move is about personal growth. Both had been dancing at the highest level for years. She became a principal at ABT in 2005; he held the same status at NYCB since 1998. And both were seeking new challenges. "When you're a dancer, the sole focus is performance," he said. "It's not just what you're dancing tomorrow, it's what you're dancing the next day and the next day."

"Now we're in charge of the schedule," said his co-artistic director. "It's a different responsibility. I wanted to find out what else I could do—coaching, teaching, getting the musicians together. I never knew I could be so organized."

#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 06:40 PM

A story on David Hallberg's early days at the Bolshoi by Sergei Loiko in The Los Angeles Times.

"I like David very much and respect him as a dancer, but it is an insult to the entire Russia ballet, a demonstration of indifference to the rich Russian tradition and culture," Nikolay Tsiskaridze, a Bolshoi premier dancer said in an interview Friday.
"The state spends a fortune to support our ballet school and at the same time the theater hires a foreigner, an American, to open the ballet season on the historical stage instead of all the great Russian dancers that we have."


#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:15 PM

The Greenville Civic Ballet gives a benefit performance of 'Cinderella.'

The company, which has previously staged benefit performances for Leo W. Jenkins Cancer Center and Brody School of Medicine’s Kidney Disease and Transplant Programs, traditionally performs a Winter Wonder production featuring the second act of “The Nutcracker,” along with “Peter and the Wolf.” Two years ago, the company began swapping fairy tales, adding “Cinderella” to its repertoire.

“We feel like we need to alternate those ballets,” Saad said. “I think ‘Peter and the Wolf’ is kind of our signature ballet, but I think the young kids love ‘Cinderella.’ It’s a timeless story. It’s a girl who’s mistreated, there’s a ‘mean-girl’ element there, and then there is a handsome prince who rescues her.”

#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 19 November 2011 - 07:18 PM

A review of a new SACD of ballet music by Saint-Saëns.

Saint-Saëns wrote 13 operas, but aside from Samson and Dalila they are mostly forgotten today. Tourniaire has arranged some of the orchestral music for the ballets in four them. Saint-Saëns was a versatile composer whose music from these operas perfectly captures the moods and feelings of the period. However, he was fairly conservative in style, staying away from Wagnerian or even Verdian influences, though always with a strong and cultivated French sound.

#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:39 AM

Holiday dance listings by Richard Nilsen in The Arizona Republic.

There are so many "Nutcrackers" that the hardest nut to crack this holiday season is which one to see. If you want a change of pace, there is always "Snow Queen."



#13 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,058 posts

Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:40 AM

A feature on Ballet White Mountains dance studio in Arizona.

Bohn is the director of a ballet studio in Lakeside called Ballet White Mountains. An open house was held on Oct. 22 and classes began Oct. 24. Bohn said she is teaching eight different classes of classical ballet covering all ages from kindergartners to high school seniors.

Bohn has been a real estate agent in Phoenix and the White Mountains, but before that she had a long career in dance. Shereceived a degree in ballet from the University of Utah, studied in Europe with Zurich Opera Ballet and has set up dance programs in two colleges – the University of Arkansas and Essex Community College in Maryland.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):