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The "Death" of Professional Criticism


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#31 dirac

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 11:26 AM

One other thing to bear in mind about professional critics is that they have to cover everything, regardless of whether it appeals or not, and write about it objectively.


This is not universally true. Professional critics don't always have to see everything (and it isn't necessarily desirable to do so). A critic should see enough to know what he's talking about, but seeing too much can dull the senses of reviewers who really have to see everything, such as movie critics for popular publications. I see what you mean about "objectively" - no critic can be truly objective but bloggers are at liberty to be fans, whereas critics should restrain such feelings insofar as humanly possible.

#32 Helene

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 02:31 PM

Just as a gentle reminder, discussing other discussion boards if off limits here, unless, like in Mashinka's post, where former discussion board members have become professional critics, it is newsworthy.

#33 Alymer

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 01:48 AM

Quote

One other thing to bear in mind about professional critics is that they have to cover everything, regardless of whether it appeals or not, and write about it objectively.

This is not universally true. Professional critics don't always have to see everything (and it isn't necessarily desirable to do so).

It's probably not the case if the critic writes a round-up type piece for a monthly magazine. There you can be reasonably selective. But for a daily or weekly paper, more or less every major performance or opening has to be covered. For instance, if company X is visiting again, you've seen them before and you hate everything they do, you still have to go and write a review. And the other exception - here in London at least - is something like Dance Umbrella or the other "contemporary" dance seasons where companies give just one show and the critic would probably see only a sample of what's on offer.

#34 variated

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 10:09 AM

Could I ask (politely) why details of other discussion boards have been deleted from my post please? I wasn't referring to any individuals and surely it's helpful for people navigating their way around interest groups on the internet to get pointers to what kind of discussion may be found where. They don't need to agree with my opinions but after all they are just opinions.

#35 dirac

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 10:30 AM

It's probably not the case if the critic writes a round-up type piece for a monthly magazine. There you can be reasonably selective. But for a daily or weekly paper, more or less every major performance or opening has to be covered.


Yes, that's what I meant when I said it wasn't universally true. Writers for weeklies are not necessarily under that compulsion, either, depending on the publication. It also depends on the art form, as well. The New Yorker has two staff movie critics who alternate issues, as the magazine has done for decades, but it's clear that nobody's forcing Joan Acocella to write about everything she may be seeing.

#36 Helene

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 10:34 AM

Could I ask (politely) why details of other discussion boards have been deleted from my post please? I wasn't referring to any individuals and surely it's helpful for people navigating their way around interest groups on the internet to get pointers to what kind of discussion may be found where. They don't need to agree with my opinions but after all they are just opinions.


As I posted above, discussion other discussion boards is off-limits at Ballet Alert! Critiquing other discussion boards or non-professional blogs is "board dragging". Our mission is to discuss classical ballet.

Google, bing, and other search engines make finding other boards and blogs simple, and our members can determine quality and interest for themselves. We encourage our members to read and participate on other boards, in comments sections of blogs, and even to start their own boards/blogs if what we offer doesn't meet all of their needs.

#37 puppytreats

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 12:30 PM

variated,
Why do you object to discussions by fans about ballet dancers, their eating habits, etc.? For people interested in identifying how an athlete excels, such information is fruitful and sometimes inspirational.

#38 puppytreats

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 12:31 PM

In the New Yorker, Acocella (I think) called Sara Mearns's dancing "creamy." What does this mean? (The article discussed Paul McCartney's ballet.)

#39 abatt

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 08:49 AM

I think using the word "creamy" for a ballet dancer refers to lyricism and beautifully flowing phrasing.

#40 bart

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 09:28 AM

I also associate 'creamy' with a certain amplitude of movement.


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