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Friday, October 28


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#1 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 09:14 AM

A review of Milwaukee Ballet's "Dracula" by Tom Strini for Third Coast Digest.

Pink has created a florid, swirling, swooning, serpentine idiom that holds throughout the piece. It could not be more apt for such an overheated late-Romantic tale. It’s sexy for its sinuous, physical ways and for its close-contact, roaming-hands partnering. David Hovhannisyan, sensational in the title role Thursday, oozed a cool, cruel sex appeal. Luz San Miguel, as the flirtatious Lucy, immediately turned liquid in his spell, except for the shudder of pleasure and pain at the bite. Valerie Harmon, who combines a long, lovely delicacy with a certain athletic wholesomeness, offered just a touch more resistance, as Mina. But once seduced, Harmon’s Mina was all in and threw herself into Dracula’s fatal caresses with admirable abandon.



#2 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 09:16 AM

Oklahoma City Ballet opens its fortieth season with "Coppelia."

In a fascinating talk before the performance, Camille Hardy, dance historian and University of Oklahoma faculty member, said OKC Ballet founders Miguel Terekhov and Yvonne Chouteau have a strong connection with this ballet. During their time with the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, Terekhov was noted for his performance as Dr. Coppelius, and Chouteau received wide acclaim in her role as Prayer.
Based on stories by E.T.A. Hoffman, OKC Ballet's version of “Coppelia” emphasized the comedic elements in this story of love and mistaken identity. Using as much of the original choreography by Arthur St. Leon as possible, artistic director Robert Mills and ballet master Jacob Sparso invited the audience into a world of lighthearted fantasy.



#3 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 09:20 AM

The Bolshoi Theater reopens.

“It’s a very happy day for our country,” Medvedev said from the stage before the concert. “Our country is big, but the number of such uniting symbols, national treasures – what we call national brands – is very limited. And the Bolshoi is one of our greatest national brands.”

The Bolshoi Theater, built in 1825, closed for reconstruction in 2005. The reconstruction was initially scheduled for completion in 2008, but the project has been marred by repeated delays as well as a misappropriation scandal

.

Related.

Tonight's concert – the most exclusive event of the Moscow cultural season – may be by invitation-only (Russian Federation President Dmitry Medvedev will be a guest) but YouTube has apparently been invited. {C}Google's (News Posted Image - Alert)video-streaming property will be broadcasting the event to the rest of the world via live cinema relays, according to AFP news.



#4 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 09:22 AM

A review of Northern Ballet's Nutcracker.

lara (Pippa Moore) also allowed her personality to shine through the role as, at times, she added amusing freestyle dance to the mix to the delight of the audience.

And the Chinese dolls, performed by Sebastian Loe and Benjamin Mitchell, were also extraordinary to watch as they contorted to the classic beat.



#5 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 09:24 AM

A review of Ballet Maribor's "Radio and Juliet" by Barbara Zuck in The Columbus Dispatch.

Ballet Maribor’s one-hour dance version of the famous Shakespearean play Romeo and Juliet offers an unusual point of view. The ballet’s creator, Romanian choreographer Edward Clug, wants to keep the audience at arm’s length and its emotions in check, on purpose.

In Radio and Juliet, Clug and the Slovenian troupe maintain that love and romance have been ruined by “the cold hand of mechanization.” The work takes its name from the alternative rock group Radiohead, whose taped music creates an aural backdrop for the movement.



#6 dirac

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Posted 28 October 2011 - 09:26 AM

Nevada Ballet Theatre kicks off its fortieth season.

Getting a creative boost from the Second City, Nevada Ballet shares the bill with Hubbard Street Dance Chicago. Directed by Glenn Edgerton and nipping at Nevada Ballet's longevity with 34 years of its own, Hubbard has been praised for what critics call its "exuberant and athletic" style.
As for the program ...

Orgasm? That's "Petite Mort." 3-D? That's "Too Beaucoup." "Blue Moon"? That's "Up." Well, that's not all they are. Explanations pending. Eclecticism is the watchword.



#7 dirac

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 09:56 PM

Ballet Idaho opens its season with "Aarrrg! Pirates.” Review by Dana Oland in The Idaho Statesman.

The silly wigs and over done costumes were ditched, and what was left was a fun, clever, delightfully silly, comic ballet by artistic director Peter Anastos.

A band of ballet pirates stumble upon a group of women, who are as skilled as they — perhaps more so — at swordplay. What ensues is a series of ballet variations (a classical form of solo and duet dances that highlight the dancer’s skills) as these two tribes square off. And they show this company very well.



#8 dirac

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Posted 29 October 2011 - 10:25 PM

The Eugene Ballet Company presents "Romeo and Juliet."

Toni Pimble, the Eugene Ballet Company cofounder who has enjoyed raves for her “Romeo and Juliet” choreography, opens the first act with a brawl. Juliet’s family, the Capulets, and Romeo’s clan, the Montagues, collide at the market, which makes for a rousing start.

The action changes tone, and changes again, with a bedroom scene, the introduction of Juliet and a classic ballroom scene. Then comes a turning point: the balcony pas de deux with the two young lovers-to-be.


“Its about a 10-minute pas de deux,” said Pimble. “It’s almost a tone poem.”

#9 dirac

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 06:04 AM

A review of Milwaukee Ballet by Elaine Schmidt in The Journal-Sentinel.

Choreographed by Milwaukee Ballet artistic director Michael Pink, with an original score by Philip Feeney, "Dracula" leans on its audience's familiarity with the story and its filmed retellings to great effect.The production's opening scenes, using detailed costumes and stage-filling sets designed by Lez Brotherston, are done in the shades of gray palette of black-and-white films, marked dramatically with occasional splashes of blood red.

But sets, costumes and score are meaningless without something compelling happening onstage, which this production has in spades.

#10 dirac

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 06:09 AM

A review of "Fall for Dance" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Thursday’s opening program brought four works, each made during this century in a separate idiom: modern dance, Memphis jookin’, postmodern dance and ballet. Feet were bare, in sneakers, in ballet slippers and in point shoes.

The Mark Morris Dance Group opened the program with “All Fours” (2003), set to Bela Bartok’s wonderful five-movement String Quartet No 4. But something inexplicable has happened: when this was performed in England, in 2003, it hit me and others as one of Mr. Morris’s most boldly imaginative and engaging responses to music, whereas on Thursday it seemed chiefly an extremely brainy array of schematic dance code, intricate and yet almost wholly unaffecting.

#11 dirac

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 06:21 AM

A review of Morphoses by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger of Newark.


She has come to the wrong place. Morphoses, the experimental company directed by Lourdes Lopez, opened “The Bacchae” at the Joyce Theater in New York, on Tuesday. Yet choreographer Luca Veggetti’s distillation of Euripides’ tragedy, in which Dionysus wreaks vengeance on the city of Thebes for refusing to admit his divinity, is dry and bloodless. Lamb’s monologue, with the dancer crouching perched on claw-like hands, is virtually the only moment when someone expresses any passion.

Instead, individuals wander past in a daze of anomie. The piece is so abstract that it requires a leap of faith even to identify the characters.

#12 dirac

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Posted 31 October 2011 - 06:22 AM

A report from the Bessie Awards by Susan Reiter for City Arts.

Monday’s Bessie Awards—much altered in format and relocated to the Apollo Theater—provided quite a fascinating evening on many counts. It was great to see throngs of Downtown dance luminaries and presenters lining up to go inside that legendary, way-uptown venue, and to observe the likes of ballet’s Wendy Whelan, Marcelo Gomes and Christopher Wheeldon in the same setting as Neil Greenberg, Tere O’Connor and Annie-B Parson. The intermingling of very different artistic sensibilities clearly sparked something in Whelan; when she accepted her Bessie for Sustained Achievement in Performance, this very busy, ultra-modern ballerina made an offer to the choreographers in the house: “I really want to explore more of the downtown world—so call me!”


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