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Wednesday, September 28


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#1 dirac

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 09:35 AM

A story on David Hallberg's move to the Bolshoi by Olga Sobolevskaya for RIA Novosti.

http://en.ria.ru/ana.../167208914.html

Hallberg's appearances at the Bolshoi and the Mariinsky (Kirov) theaters from 2008-2011 revealed him as a virtuoso dancer best suited for romantic parts. And lyrical dancers with impeccable technical skill are hard to come by. Filin was, and remains, one of the few.

It was Filin who invited his American colleague to work at the Bolshoi. Filin's predecessor, Alexei Ratmansky, had engaged Hallberg in his 2010 production of "The Nutcracker" at the ABT. And this year, Hallberg appeared as Prince Siegfried in "Swan Lake" at the Mariinsky Ballet Festival.



#2 dirac

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 09:37 AM

American Ballet Theatre will present a course on its training techniques in St. Petersburg. Item in brief.

http://artsbeat.blog...urse-in-russia/

Ballet Theater will hold the five-day session starting on Oct. 31 to present its National Training Curriculum, which the company said had certified 550 teachers across the United States since the program’s start in 2008. The curriculum combines “artistic training with the basics of dancer health and child development,” Ballet Theater said.



#3 dirac

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 09:39 AM

Fallen Angels Dance Theatre offers jobs to ex-addicts performing alongside professional dancers.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...eyside-15096270

Fallen Angels was set up by former Birmingham Royal Ballet soloist Paul Bayes-Kitcher.He says the idea for it came out of his work at a drug rehabilitation centre and that it has been better than he could ever have hoped for. "I was dancing for 12 years professionally and I've never had an experience like this.

"Some people said to me they were more scared of doing dance than they were of their heroin detox....



#4 dirac

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Posted 28 September 2011 - 09:41 AM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Sandra Kurtz in Seattle Weekly.

http://www.seattlewe...s-all-wheeldon/

Pacific Northwest Ballet has opened its season with a mixed bill that might not seem that mixed—four works, all by Christopher Wheeldon. In some single-choreographer programs, you get the feeling the artist has one point to make, and makes it over and over again, while other artists are all over the map, still searching for their personal style. Wheeldon is placed nicely in the middle, with a substantial technical background underpinning a wide-ranging curiosity about dancing of all sorts.



#5 dirac

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 10:11 AM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet by Alex Hudson for Seattlest.

http://seattlest.com...northwest_b.php

This was fine form for the PNB season opener. The company is so strong in their technical and emotional execution. The music was performed with at time aching beauty by the symphony orchestra and Wheeldon's choreography was gorgeous. He's a modern master, and PNB's All Wheeldon is a fine opportunity to behold his genius.



#6 dirac

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 10:17 AM

A review of the Smuin Ballet by Lauren Gallagher in The Examiner.

http://www.sfexamine...ssy-and-serious

“Tango Palace: Tangos, fados and other curios,” is classic Smuin. In the theatrical, crowd-pleasing work inspired by tango’s sensual mythologies, three couples twist and tangle their bodies around each other in a battle between the sexes. Terez Dean, with her spirited, perfectly timed jauntiness and charm, proved most seductive.

Smuin’s somber “Stabat Mater” is multilayered. The poignant piece, choreographed to Antonin Dvorak’s choral work of the same name, was Smuin’s response to 9/11. Dvorak, who took the Latin title from the traditional Catholic hymn devoted to Mary’s sorrow, composed the work in memory of the death of his infant daughter.



#7 dirac

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 10:21 AM

A review of the Paris Opera Ballet by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

http://www.nytimes.c...eview.html?_r=1

If “Phèdre” represents the past, “Psyché” doesn’t loudly announce its entry to the 21st century. Mr. Ratmansky, the American Ballet Theater’s Russian-born artist in residence, is perhaps ballet’s great hope. But those who were expecting high contemporaneity from his Paris commission were probably disappointed. “Psyché ” is a delicately wrought, traditional-looking piece that alludes to a romantic era of nymphs and cherubs, dancing flowers and animals, gods and mortals cavorting in enchanted places.



#8 dirac

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 04:13 PM

A WNYC interview with Jennifer Homans on "Ocean's Kingdom." Audio.

http://www.wnyc.org/...11-paul-pointe/

In the first of a three-part series, we start with a review of “Ocean’s Kingdom,” McCartney’s first ballet score. We’re joined by Jennifer Homans, dance critic for The New Republic and author of the ballet history “Apollo’s Angels.”



#9 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 05:06 PM

Asheville Ballet kicks off its season this weekend.

http://www.citizen-t...Entertainment|p

As director of the Asheville Ballet, dancer and choreographer Ann Dunn has always liked the idea of bringing a diverse crowd to her productions.

That’s certainly her goal with the ballet’s season-opening effort this weekend at Diana Wortham Theatre. “Some people say they like ballet, but they don’t like modern dance. Some say they like modern dance, but don’t think they like ballet,” she said.



#10 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 05:13 PM

Photo gallery and video clip of the Smuin Ballet.

http://www.sfbg.com/...alace-fine-arts

The stage was sheathed in a cloak of purple smoke, that coated the dancer's skin as they whirled their way across the black floor. Smuin Ballet was doing a final run through of their piece Tango Palace at the Palace of Fine Arts last week, in preparation for opening night, and I was there to snap a few photos of those final moments of rehearsal on 9/23/2011.



#11 dirac

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Posted 30 September 2011 - 05:20 PM

Two reviews of San Francisco Ballet in Orange County.

The Orange County Register:

http://www.ocregiste...ng-company.html

A mixed-repertoire evening at the Segerstrom Center on Tuesday reinforced that opinion. It featured three works, each of which showed different aspects of the company's myriad strengths.

It also revealed that there's room for a little improvement. The male corps de ballet has some less-than-stellar dancers, and sometimes Tomasson's extreme attention to detail and absolute conformity suppresses the dancers' personalities in his quest for technical precision.


The Los Angeles Times' blog:

http://latimesblogs....om-center-.html

Set to Tchaikovsky’s “Souvenir de Florence,” “Trio” opened the company’s mixed repertory program Tuesday in Costa Mesa’s Segerstrom Hall (repeated Wednesday, with “Romeo and Juliet” on the weekend). “Trio” is elegant and engrossing. It astutely exploits the soaring ache of Tchaikovsky’s emotive strings (transcribed for orchestra, with music director Martin West conducting the Pacific Symphony). Costume designer Mark Zappone’s well-cut, diaphanous gowns and Alexander Nichols’ backdrop of painted archways further telegraphed romanticism.




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