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Saturday, September 24


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#1 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:28 AM

A story on the New York City Ballet gala by Pia Catton in The Wall Street Journal.

Sir Paul stood from his seat, waved and gave the crowd an air-guitar salute. As the evening's performance went on, it also became clear that he had given City Ballet a vibrant, danceable work of new music.

"I think he's a wonderful composer," said "Saturday Night Live" producer Lorne Michaels, one of the gala co-chairs. "He's done several classical pieces, and this was very brave on his part."



#2 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:29 AM

A review of NYCB in "Ocean's Kingdom" by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger of Newark.

Many of those present had paid handsomely for the privilege, but even so no one was making it easy for them. The ex-Beatle didn’t appear on stage until after the premiere of “Ocean’s Kingdom,” the latest fiasco choreographed by Peter Martins, the company’s ballet-master-in-chief.

McCartney, who composed the score, was the last member of the creative team to take a bow, and as ballerina Sara Mearns headed for the wings with open arms, the crowd tensed. This was it—showtime!—and although the puckered hipster no longer inspires sobbing teenage girls to hurl themselves at him, the audience did rouse itself from its seats for a better view.



#3 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:32 AM

A review of Tulsa Ballet in 'The Merry Widow' by James D. Watts Jr. in Tulsa World.

Hynd is a true storyteller as a choreographer. No programs were available at Thursday's invitational dress rehearsal, yet one truly did not need to read a synopsis to follow the plot of "The Merry Widow." Hynd's expressive choreography and judicious use of pantomime made everything crystal clear.

And funny. That's another rare talent Hynd possesses - his ability to infuse his choreography with true wit. Yes, there are moments of broad, farcical humor in "The Merry Widow," but most of the comedy is much more subtle, yet not less effective.



#4 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:34 AM

A review of the National Ballet of Canada by Janet Smith for straight.com.


Edgy, angular works by William Forsythe and Crystal Pite—and even a piece set to Johnny Cash—showed the company is poised squarely in the here in now. Yes, as dance fans here know thanks to Ballet B.C., Canadian ballet in the 21st century is about much more than princesses and swans.

The highlight of the anniversary tour’s program is its two en pointe bookend pieces: Forsythe’s sleekly grey and mathematical the second detail and Pite’s skittish, eerily insectlike Emergence.



#5 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:35 AM

A review of the National Ballet of China by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

On the other hand, this company is unabashedly modern. Its approach to ballet — with crisp execution, six o’clock extensions for men as well as women, and the occasional back flip — is in line with current aesthetics. Whether on the stage or in the gymnastics arena (this evening borrowed from both), audiences respond appreciatively to high energy and unwavering form. This troupe has both in spades. It is on the leading edge of the athletic trend in ballet.

Another trend the company is following is dancing to canned music. The crashing cymbals in “Red Detachment,” the shimmering piano concerto in “The Yellow River” and the inflamed enchantment of the second act of Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake” were taped. This is not a practice that is going to augment any ballet dancer’s artistic development.



#6 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:37 AM

A review of Martha Schabas' ballet novel "Various Positions" by Candace Fertile in The Vancouver Sun.

The problem is that in their desire to fit the mould, the students have no idea what damage they are doing to themselves, and Georgia, who has tried to help a fellow student lose weight, is caught in a downward spiral of guilt and chaos about body image. And all these feelings are happening when girls are going through an extremely difficult time in their lives and trying to come to grips with their own sexuality.



#7 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:41 AM

Three Orlando Ballet dancers have special expectations for the new season.

As it turns out, it was for exactly the same reason — and the two women are expecting their babies, both girls, on Dec. 17.

Jessica Sibley, another Orlando Ballet dancer, had already learned she was pregnant, making a trio of ballerinas who will add another title to their repertoire: Mom. "We were saying it must be contagious," jokes Yasukawa.



#8 dirac

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:49 AM

A feature on Laura Catherine Hilley of Mobile Ballet.

A member of the Mobile Ballet Co. since age 11, Laura Catherine has danced in its productions of “The Nutcracker,” “Cinderella,” “Dracula” and “Sleeping Beauty.” The two years of instruction she will receive in Houston will build upon her previous experience.

Laura Catherine entered the pre-professional program late last month. It includes 22 classes a week (Monday through Saturday), for a total of 30 to 40 hours of dance instruction.



#9 dirac

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 11:15 AM

Ballet Arizona presents its "Ballet Under the Stars" series of free performances.

In 14 years of Ballet Under the Stars, this is the first time it has come to Casa Grande. The evening, which was free to the public, was made possible by the city of Casa Grande, Arizona Public Service Co., Walmart Distribution Center, the Arizona Lottery, the National Endowment for the Arts and other sponsors.

Parks and Recreation Superintendent Caryl Chase said APS Community Development Manager Judee Jackson approached Ballet Arizona about coming to Casa Grande, and the city looked for a park with enough space, parking and facilities.



#10 dirac

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 11:25 AM

A review of "Ocean's Kingdom" by Tobi Tobias in her blog, "Seeing Things."

.......The scenery, for which the program blames Perry Silvey, is weightless, almost non-existent, consisting of unconvincing projections. Does the feeble decor reflect City Ballet's making a last-ditch gesture toward keeping expenses down just in case the ballet fails to prove immortal?

The pre-curtain efforts of the City Ballet's chief music man Fayçal Karoui and his orchestra to make a case for the score were well brought off but unconvincing. The little teaching session served to fill in time because, I'm told, McCartney refused to have any other ballet share the gala opening-night program, (not even Balanchine's Union Jack, which was originally scheduled).



#11 dirac

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 09:21 AM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet's all-Wheeldon program by Philippa Kiraly for The SunBreak.

http://thesunbreak.c...heeldon-at-pnb/

Carousel (A Dance) uses Richard Rodgers’ familiar music but in arrangement by William David Brohn. Wheeldon takes just a vignette from the show, the wooing of the girl at a fair, with the carnival feel given by the other dancers creating the sense of a Ferris wheel in the back. Carla Körbes gave a masterly portrayal of the shy young woman and her gradual winning over. Setha Orza as her suitor danced with moves clean, musical, and ardent, the best I’ve ever seen from him.

Wheeldon creates a situation where neither dancer can reach the other for all the people in between, and at one point the corps make an actual carousel with poles rising and falling as they go around, in which they mirror the circle of the carousel itself, wrists, feet, heads and all in circular movements.




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