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Sunday, August 14


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#1 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 05:21 AM

A review of the Mariinsky (Kirov) Ballet in 'Anna Karenina' by Clifford Bishop in The Independent.

http://www.independe...on-2337163.html

Telling so much in such a short space – Rodion Shchedrin's airless score, written in 1972 for wife Maya Plisetskaya's version of Anna Karenina, is only 85 minutes long – calls for all Ratmansky's considerable incisive wit. Major events gallop past, including the horse race where Anna believes Vronsky has been killed – almost subliminally suggested by a back-projection of thundering hooves and a group of spectators vacating their chairs so dancers can jeté across the stage behind them, like thoroughbreds leaping fences.



#2 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 05:23 AM

The relationship between the Joffrey Ballet and the Cleveland Orchestra is detailed:

http://www.cleveland..._relations.html

Three years old (and counting), the partnership between the Cleveland Orchestra and Chicago's Joffrey Ballet just about constitutes a tradition.

But if it's starting to seem as though dance has a permanent place on the calendar at Blossom Music Center, events this summer very nearly proved that supposition wrong -- and almost nipped a burgeoning relationship in the bud.



#3 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 14 August 2011 - 05:27 AM

The Mariinsky Ballet is reviewed at Covent Garden:

http://www.independe...on-2337163.html

Under the pressure of recording events, Ratmansky's dances are astute rather than truly penetrating. There is rarely the impression, which occurs so often in the book, of character being laid bare at a stroke. Only Islom Baimuradov's Karenin a hand-wringing pharisee of judgment and self-deception and Diana Vishneva as Anna become fully three dimensional. Vishneva's Anna, if anything, is more compelling than Tolstoy's; a transfigured, sensual saint who finds only mortification where she expected ecstasy, and in the end convinces herself that there is no difference.




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