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Friday, July 8


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#1 dirac

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 11:00 AM

A lawyer who once represented dancers of American Ballet Theatre pleads guilty to the charge of falsifying documents.

The Associated Press

He is the former attorney for the Independent Artists of America, a union which represented about 80 ABT dancers and stagehands.

The prosecutor says Leibowitz wrote union checks to himself, his law firm, and his former wife.


Courthouse News Service

Leibowitz, 72, of Highland Beach, Fla., agreed to forfeit "the proceeds of his crime" and pay $76,071 in restitution, the U.S. Attorney's Office said in announcing the guilty plea.

Leibowitz represented the Independent Artists of America, a union of about 80 dancers and stagehands at Lincoln Center's American Ballet Theatre. Union members paid a total of about $80,000 a year in dues, and Leibowitz controlled the account.



#2 dirac

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 11:02 AM

A story on the Mariinsky/Kirov's venture into 3-D by Pia Catton in The Wall Street Journal.

The company, formerly the Kirov, will be performing on stage at Lincoln Center Festival next week, but those without a ticket can catch its production of “Giselle” on July 12 at cinemas in New York and in select markets around the country.

The 3-D ballet broadcast is presented by NCM Fathom, which has given the Metropolitan Opera and the Broadway musical “Memphis” high-definition movie theater exposure in the past. The screening of “Giselle” will mark the first time Fathom has used 3-D for the arts. Previously, the technology has been used to show sports events, such as Wimbledon and the World Cup.



#3 dirac

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 11:09 AM

Nashville Ballet will perform an Andy Warhol-inspired program this weekend. Item in brief.

According to a news release from the ballet, the performance at the center's atrium will be inspired by Warhol's aesthetic and artistic style. The performance will mimic Warhol's art that features everyday objects, and will be set to popular music from the era of Warhol's pop art and screen prints.



#4 dirac

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 11:14 AM

A story on Valery Gergiev and his relationship to the Mariinsky's ballet troupe by Pia Catton in the WSJ.

The Mariinsky Ballet (formerly the Kirov) is part of St. Petersburg's Mariinsky Theatre, also home to the Mariinsky Opera and Mariinsky Orchestra. All three are led by Valery Gergiev, one of the world's foremost opera and classical-music conductors.

When the Mariinsky Ballet performs at the Lincoln Center Festival in New York next week, close watchers will see signs of Mr. Gergiev's influence. The works in the programs are a reflection of Mr. Gergiev's interest in Russian composer Rodion Shchedrin, who since the 1950s has built a body of work that includes ballet, opera and orchestral music, but who is not widely known in the U.S.



#5 dirac

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 11:06 AM

A feature on the American Repertory Ballet and Princeton Ballet School summer intensive course by Tammy La Gorce in The New York Times.

The Summer Intensive, now in its 30th year, attracts aspiring dancers, ages 13 to the early 20s, to Princeton each summer, mostly from the United States but also from places around the globe. This year’s 85 dancers were chosen from more than 250 who auditioned in various cities over the winter. They arrived for the session, which runs from June 27 to July 29, from countries that include France, Italy, Israel and Switzerland. On July 29, they will perform a 90-minute show at the McCarter Theater Center in Princeton.

The students — 76 women and 9 men this year — are drawn to the program’s longevity as well as its reputation, according to Mary Pat Robertson, director of the Princeton Ballet School, founded in 1954, which is the official school of the American Repertory Ballet, a professional company.



#6 dirac

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 11:13 AM

A feature on Betty Ford's role in helping develop what would become the Vail International Dance Festival.

Within a day, the Foundation was able to rally enough financial pledges to pay for the shows. But money was just part of the challenge.

Former President Gerald Ford used his connections with the State Department to help bring the ballet academy to Vail, according to the book, “Betty Ford: Vail Valley's First Lady.” But it was Betty Ford, who struck a special friendship with the dance academy's leader, Madame Sophia Golovkina, that nurtured Vail's long relationship with the academy, and with dance in general, said Allie Coppeak, an organizer with the Foundation.



#7 dirac

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Posted 10 July 2011 - 09:39 PM

A review of By Judith Chazin-Bennahum's René Blum and the Ballets Russes: In Search of a Lost Life by Jennifer Homans in The New York Times.

Blum now has a biographer. She is Judith Chazin-Bennahum, a historian of dance who has written about 18th- and 19th-century French ballet and the English choreographer Antony Tudor. Her research is worthy, and we owe her a debt for bringing Blum back into historical view. Unfortunately, the book is not engagingly written. Rather than synthesizing her considerable knowledge and narrating the story of Blum’s life, Chazin-Bennahum reports on her research, and the chapters often have a plodding, “one darned document after another” feel. Just as regrettable is the superficiality of her discussions of such topics as the Dreyfus affair, “Jewish heritage” and Proust’s idea of memory. None of this brings us closer to Blum.

When she gets to his involvement with ballet, however, Chazin-Bennahum is more at ease, and it is here — in her descriptions of the demands and details of running a dance troupe — that we learn most about Blum and why he mattered.....




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