vipa

ABT at the Met 2011 - Sleeping Beauty

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Not to start a trend but Osipova (and Vasiliev) did this a few months ago as well with the Tour de Force gala...she's clearly being overbooked by whomever is setting up these contracts for her. Also, Aurora is a new role to her (in that she danced it one time before), I would have hoped even with her packed schedule she was planning a little more than a few hours of brush up rehearsal with Hallberg. A day or two should be more than enough time to get acclimated to a new partner in the ballet world--Look at Semionova and Gomes with Swan Lake.

I am surprised Cojocaru has been so reliable, if you take a look at her schedule on her website it's absolutely insane how much flying around she is doing.

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Osipova also pulled out of the Sunday matinee of the Bolshoi's Corsaire in DC two springs ago, citing "exhaustion" after she'd danced Medora the night before (and missed an entrance during the Jardin Animee during that performance too, if I recall correctly - I mean completely missed, corps dancing around, no principle dancer for twenty to thirty seconds of what was supposed to be a major variation, everyone wondering what was going on (it was the spring before this one, a couple of nights after her Sylphide at ABT)).

With Cojacaru stepping in, few viewers will complain, we've actually stepped up for this particular role. Beauty is not Osipova's ideal range at this point. All the same this isn't presumably the kind of thing that endears one to company directors.

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Not to start a trend but Osipova (and Vasiliev) did this a few months ago as well with the Tour de Force gala...she's clearly being overbooked by whomever is setting up these contracts for her. Also, Aurora is a new role to her (in that she danced it one time before), I would have hoped even with her packed schedule she was planning a little more than a few hours of brush up rehearsal with Hallberg. A day or two should be more than enough time to get acclimated to a new partner in the ballet world--Look at Semionova and Gomes with Swan Lake.

Seminova and Gomes danced together several times including full length ballet such as Sylvia before Swan Lake. I think that's why Gomes stepped into Seminova Swan Lake when Hallberg was injured. It seems to me Osipova does not have reliable partner who can pull the SB performance off with one or two days rehaersal period at ABT except Hallberg this time. Since guesting ABT, Osipova danced with Hallberg, Cornejo, Carreno and Simkin. Hallberg and Cornejo injured, Carreno retired, Simkin does not have SB prince in his repotoire. I agree Osipova is overbooked, but I don't think that's the sole reason of the cancellation.

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Osipova also pulled out of the Sunday matinee of the Bolshoi's Corsaire in DC two springs ago, citing "exhaustion" after she'd danced Medora the night before (and missed an entrance during the Jardin Animee during that performance too, if I recall correctly - I mean completely missed, corps dancing around, no principle dancer for twenty to thirty seconds of what was supposed to be a major variation, everyone wondering what was going on (it was the spring before this one, a couple of nights after her Sylphide at ABT)).

With Cojacaru stepping in, few viewers will complain, we've actually stepped up for this particular role. Beauty is not Osipova's ideal range at this point. All the same this isn't presumably the kind of thing that endears one to company directors.

I remember it differently, that she actually had a high fever and was told she couldn't dance but at this point, it's been several years, maybe I am misremembering...

I don't think it's the same thing in any case.

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It’s unfortunate that Osipova’s performance was canceled, but it actually worked out well for me. I really wanted to see Cojocaru/Kobborg but can’t make Friday night’s performance, so now I get to see them tonight! :clapping:

It seems like things like this happen all the time with the guest artists—people grumbled about Bolle’s cancellations due to an injury last year—so I’m not that surprised, though I certainly understand others' disappointment.

And I agree with mer01 (congrats on your first post!)—the situation is not quite the same as with Semionova/Gomes, since they have danced together and well, Gomes is Gomes!

**

I attended last night’s performance with Part/Gomes/Abrera and thought it was fine. I have to admit that I have avoided seeing Part in the past because her occasional technique bobbles make me nervous, but several posters raved about Part/Gomes performance last year, so I decided to check it out. Tonight, however, Part seemed completely “on” and even seemed comfortable in the infamous Rose Adagio balance section. She may not look at all like a 16-year old girl, but she uses her body beautifully and her lines are lovely. She has a powerful grand jete, and I was especially impressed by the ones where she did a little flourish with her front leg (like a little kick before extending it out).

I was sitting in the orchestra on the left side, and it was so strange/hilarious to see that man come down the aisle with the usher chasing after him after that scene!

Gomes was his usual fabulous self, but there’s really not much for him to do as Prince Desire.

I love Stella, so it was a pleasure to see her as the Lilac Fairy.

But it was perhaps more of a pleasant surprise to see my new corps favorite Renata Pavam as one of the fairies (the one in blue—I forgot the name). Her variation was simply lovely. She also had an un-credited appearance as one of Aurora’s friends (doing double duty!). The other fairies were Hee Seo (in green, subbing for Maria Ricetto), Isabella Boylston (orange), Misty Copeland (red), and Yuriko Kajiya (yellow). Unfortunately, Kajiya’s variation (or the way she performed it), made me think of those science experiments where they feed bees caffeine and watch them go spastic. Is it supposed to look like that?

In the final act, Daniil Simkin’s Bluebird was a standout. He landed his first set of jumps with very deep, juicy plies. Later, his sequence of brise vole (the side to side jumps with beats of the legs) was remarkable. Unfortunately, at the end, he flubbed the lift where Sarah is supposed to end up lying on his shoulder on her stomach (I think), and instead ended up carrying her offstage with his arms. Yep, methinks he still needs to work on that partnering.

I have seen the Act III pas de deux a number of times, not only in ABT’s production, but also in galas with dancers from other companies, and I always feel like it looks a little uncomfortable. Last night’s partnering was great, and the fish dives were fantastic (though even Gomes couldn’t keep Part’s supported pirouettes completely centered). But I still find the choreography baffling. When Aurora is in passé-releve supported by the Prince, why does she keep flopping over to the side like that? I don’t get it. And what exactly is she supposed to be doing in her variation? Needless to say, this is not my favorite pas de deux.

The same can be said for the ballet as a whole, though I suspect only part of my dislike comes from ABT’s production in itself. True, during Act I, I suddenly felt like I was in the middle of a “Skittles: taste the rainbow” commercial, but I’m not sure a more sober, less-candy-colored version would be more enjoyable for me. But once again, I am completely clueless about other versions of the ballet, so perhaps the more seasoned veterans can tell me about some of the superior productions they’ve seen. :sweatingbullets:

I suspect, though, that the problem for me with this ballet is the story. “Sleeping Beauty” is not a drama, nor an over-the-top comedy like “Don Quixote” or “The Bright Stream.” It’s a fairy-tale like “Cinderella,” but there is no real conflict (it takes all of what, two seconds for the Prince to eliminate Carabosse?), no reversal of fortune for the characters (elevation of Cinderella from rags to riches; punishment for her stepsisters/mother), and no real chance for the Prince and Aurora to fall in love on stage. The music is undeniably lovely (except when played badly as it was occasionally last night), there may be some nice dancing, and it might be enjoyable to see your favorites or star ballerinas in it, but I suspect that it will never be a favorite ballet of mine.

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I suspect, though, that the problem for me with this ballet is the story. “Sleeping Beauty” is not a drama, nor an over-the-top comedy like “Don Quixote” or “The Bright Stream.” It’s a fairy-tale like “Cinderella,” but there is no real conflict (it takes all of what, two seconds for the Prince to eliminate Carabosse?), no reversal of fortune for the characters (elevation of Cinderella from rags to riches; punishment for her stepsisters/mother), and no real chance for the Prince and Aurora to fall in love on stage. The music is undeniably lovely (except when played badly as it was occasionally last night), there may be some nice dancing, and it might be enjoyable to see your favorites or star ballerinas in it, but I suspect that it will never be a favorite ballet of mine.

I agree completely - SL is not a drama. Unlike Cinderella where the protagonist gets rewarded for being nice to a destitute stranger, Aurora hasn't done anything to deserve all the gifts she's being blessed with at BIRTH.

Sleeping Beauty is not about character development or dramatic conflicts, but about the promise (and eventual fulfillment) of absolute happiness which is presented as a pure gift, inexplicably bestowed upon Aurora for no apparent reason and without requiring anything from her in return. The ultimate gift, so to speak :)

At least, that's the way I always saw it :)

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I suspect, though, that the problem for me with this ballet is the story. “Sleeping Beauty” is not a drama, nor an over-the-top comedy like “Don Quixote” or “The Bright Stream.” It’s a fairy-tale like “Cinderella,” but there is no real conflict (it takes all of what, two seconds for the Prince to eliminate Carabosse?), no reversal of fortune for the characters (elevation of Cinderella from rags to riches; punishment for her stepsisters/mother), and no real chance for the Prince and Aurora to fall in love on stage. The music is undeniably lovely (except when played badly as it was occasionally last night), there may be some nice dancing, and it might be enjoyable to see your favorites or star ballerinas in it, but I suspect that it will never be a favorite ballet of mine.

I agree completely - SL is not a drama. Unlike Cinderella where the protagonist gets rewarded for being nice to a destitute stranger, Aurora hasn't done anything to deserve all the gifts she's being blessed with at BIRTH.

Sleeping Beauty is not about character development or dramatic conflicts, but about the promise (and eventual fulfillment) of absolute happiness which is presented as a pure gift, inexplicably bestowed upon Aurora for no apparent reason and without requiring anything from her in return. The ultimate gift, so to speak :)

At least, that's the way I always saw it :)

Are you saying it is about Grace? Would unmerited forgiveness be a gift, and would birth itself be a sin, then?(Question asked by a nice Jewish girl who knows very little Christian theology.)

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There certainly does seem to be an element of unearned grace, as Waelsung says. I'm not so sure that there is nothing in the way of "character development." There are striking changes in Aurora, especially as expressed through her choreography, as she moves from the Birthday Scene to the Vision and Awakening Scenes to the Wedding Scene.

One of the strengths of Fonteyn's performance is that she was able to make each part of this development believable on its own, while convincing us that Aurora has become a much more serious, complex, and womanly character by the end. The final tableau -- with everyone posing prettily and Aurora and Desire, side by side, commanding center stage -- should not just be a pretty picture. It has to have dramatic impact, and it has to be earned.

I admit that I find quite a lot of "dramatic conflict" in SB. Fairies, witches, wicked minions, guardian fairies: all help wrench the world from Order to Chaos to the Restoration of Order, but of a more transcendent kind than at the start.

A cynic might say that this is a story line designed to send the Romanovs back to their palaces with tears in their eyes and smiles on their faces.

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Also, I admit that I find quite a lot of "dramatic conflict" in SB.

Yes, but it's all rather silly, isn't it? The whole framing conflict hinges on a forgotten party invitation, and too much of the evening is spent with fair maidens swooning over spindles.

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Are you saying it is about Grace? Would unmerited forgiveness be a gift, and would birth itself be a sin, then?(Question asked by a nice Jewish girl who knows very little Christian theology.)

Unearned, unmerited Grace, yes. But why would birth be a sin in this context? No quite sure I get the connection here. I'd rather think, it's quite the opposite: Aurora is born into a magic kingdom of light and goodness, and without having done anything either good or bad, she receives everything one can only dream of. Sin has no role to play here.

Or did I completely misunderstand you and you meant something else?

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A cynic might say that this is a story line designed to send the Romanovs back to their palaces with tears in their eyes and smiles on their faces.

From a political POV, I always thought that SL symbolizes the union of Russia and France which had such horrific consequences for the Romanovs and their empire. Dragged into the World Word I by their Antanta allies, Romanovs would fall prey to the revolutionary Carabosses and lose everything.

Of course, the history has not ended in 1917, so it still remains to be seen if this idyllic paradise can be restored by some kind of a gorgeous prince.

Sarkozy anyone? :)

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I'm at a hotel computer where I have to pay for every second, but since I wrote to express my disappointment at missing Osipova, I feel obliged to write and add, having seen Wednesday night's performance, that I cannot regret that I will see Cojocaru twice in the role. Tonight her performance was not without flaws, but it also had details and emotional qualities that made it still more powerful for me than the pretty much flawless performance I saw her give with the Royal a few years ago.

I also want to say how much I enjoyed Boylston as Princess Florined--this is the first time I have seen her. She does not have the prettiest lines in the world, but she dances with tremendous verve and energy. She was the one ABT dancer on stage whose dancing said (in the best possible way) 'look at me.' Radetsky was giving it his all as Bluebird and I thought he did well, but he looked like he was giving it his all--she looked like she was dancing.

Since I'm having to pay for my time, I refrain from comment on the production other than to note that a big problem is simply how thin it looks (too few dancers) and how cheap.

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The NYT review of Sleeping Beauty is out. Surprise,surprise!! AM almost gives it a favorable review. :smilie_mondieu:

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The NYT review of Sleeping Beauty is out. Surprise,surprise!! AM almost gives it a favorable review. :smilie_mondieu:

He has partially complimented Part twice in a week....one wonders if he is feeling well??

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The NYT review of Sleeping Beauty is out. Surprise,surprise!! AM almost gives it a favorable review. :smilie_mondieu:

He has partially complimented Part twice in a week....one wonders if he is feeling well??

so funny, i could not believe my eyes either.....he will end up adoring her, in a year or two, lol, and once he does, then Part will turn, all of the sudden, in the most lyrical, expressive and gifted dancer that he has seen in the past 30 yrs.........

BTW, I saw Veronika on Monday, she danced very solid and had some majestic moments, especially in Act II, but I think she did much better last year, which I remember being magical. I think she had too little rehearsal time after her SL on Friday night, and this may have had an impact on her performance.

The production looked even worst to me, cheap, like.. really cheap, the lighting was awful too. The costumes.....better not to say anything at this point....Marcelo danced amazingly, as usual, and partnered Part as he can only do, however, he also looked to me a little tired sometimes (I dont blame him!). In general, everybody looked low on energy...I guess its the end of a long season and the corp dancers must be exhausted..

I loved Abrera very much, and I am not a big fan of her, but she did dance beautifully and strong (much better than in her Mercedes, for example). Simkim solos were stunning, especially his elevation...., and Sarah Lane held herself very well, her variation was flawless, the partnering looked good...until the end. She slipped through his hands, and ended up being held in an ugly position, next to his hip.......

I hope by Friday things look a little better, I cant wait to see Alina again !!!!

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so funny, i could not believe my eyes either.....he will end up adoring her, in a year or two, lol, and once he does, then Part will turn, all of the sudden, in the most lyrical, expressive and gifted dancer that he has seen in the past 30 yrs.........

BTW, I saw Veronika on Monday, she danced very solid and had some majestic moments, especially in Act II, but I think she did much better last year, which I remember being magical. I think she had too little rehearsal time after her SL on Friday night, and this may have had an impact on her performance.

The production looked even worst to me, cheap, like.. really cheap, the lighting was awful too. The costumes.....better not to say anything at this point....Marcelo danced amazingly, as usual, and partnered Part as he can only do, however, he also looked to me a little tired sometimes (I dont blame him!). In general, everybody looked low on energy...I guess its the end of a long season and the corp dancers must be exhausted..

I loved Abrera very much, and I am not a big fan of her, but she did dance beautifully and strong (much better than in her Mercedes, for example). Simkim solos were stunning, especially his elevation...., and Sarah Lane held herself very well, her variation was flawless, the partnering looked good...until the end. She slipped through his hands, and ended up being held in an ugly position, next to his hip.......

I hope by Friday things look a little better, I cant wait to see Alina again !!!!

I look forward to that turnaround -- Veronika deserves the attention!

I agree with all that you say about Tuesday's performance, and last year's. She was solid on Tuesday, for the most part (a slip here and there), and there were some typically gorgeous moments, but you could tell at times that she was getting through it; last year she seemed fully absorbed in the role. She definitely still has her off nights. Still, I'll see her on an off night, fully recognize all the problems, and yet still find it completely worth it for those moments of breathtaking gorgeousness. I thought that Macaulay very fairly captured that experience in his description.

Renata Pavam, IMO, was the standout among the fairies, at least in Act I. Simkin and Lane looked great, apart from the partnering problems. This is the best I've seen her in awhile.

The company as a whole, though -- as you said -- looked low on energy, even sloppy and uninspired. I'd be willing to chalk it up, as you do, to the end of a long season, but I feel they've looked like this, off and on, all season long.

At least, by now, the main problem with SB seems to be just the physical production: sets and costumes, etc. Other than that interminable opening to Act I (the death sentences, pleas, exonerations, etc.), the staging seems to work.

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Are you saying it is about Grace? Would unmerited forgiveness be a gift, and would birth itself be a sin, then?(Question asked by a nice Jewish girl who knows very little Christian theology.)

Unearned, unmerited Grace, yes. But why would birth be a sin in this context? No quite sure I get the connection here. I'd rather think, it's quite the opposite: Aurora is born into a magic kingdom of light and goodness, and without having done anything either good or bad, she receives everything one can only dream of. Sin has no role to play here.

Or did I completely misunderstand you and you meant something else?

Your comment about unearned gifts made me believe you were suggesting an underlying Christian theme in this story, as in many stories about birth and rebirth. Therefore, I asked my question about unearned Grace and forgiveness of sin. Pardon my limited understanding of Christian theology. I thought Grace was unmerited, "prepaid" forgiveness of sin, and man is sinful by nature, having been born as a result of so-called original sin. Do children inherit the sin of their parents, as a result? Will she commit a future sin by virtue of being human and having free will? If she is asleep, does she avoid her sin and/or be reborn? Maybe I am going off course. I have not really thought this through very thoroughly.

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Folks - I know we've been more lenient, particularly on the Russian company forums, but we need to take it easy on unsourced information. Otherwise we'll just back-and-forth on its veracity.

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The July 6th matinee performance of ABT’s The Sleeping Beauty is noteworthy especially for Xiomara Reyes’ wonderful performance. As Aurora, Reyes stands out for her sparkling footwork. She is not a dancer known for her balances, so Reyes’ Rose Adagio is a lovely surprise. She doesn’t hold her balances for a long time, but they are all very secure. Reyes has a very flexible upper body which she uses beautifully at the beginning of the Act III grand pas de deux. Her gorgeous port de bras enriches her solo in the same pas de deux. Reyes is also a very good actress. In Act I (“The Spell”) Reyes really seems like a glowing sixteen year old ready to face life and love. She is celestial in Act II’s vision scene and a happily confident young bride in the final act.

Cory Stearns is very young Prince Desire with an engaging personality. After he sees the vision of Aurora, he is like a puppy dog in his eagerness to find the Princess and marry her. Stearns is not as exciting a dancer as some of the other ABT male principals, but his solos were well performed. Stearns is also a very attentive partner. In the past, Stearns has been paired with ballerinas (Veronika Part and Michele Wiles) who were too tall for him to effectively partner. The petite Reyes is a much better fit for him.

Stella Abrera dances the role of the Lilac Fairy with lyrical grandeur. Her serene control is embellished by Abrera’s beautiful epaulement and her gorgeous line.

As the Bluebird, Jared Matthews is very disappointing. Both his jumps and entrechats lack height and his ballon is very weak. Yuriko Kajiya, however, shows gossamer lightness and delicacy as Princess Florine.

American Ballet Theatre’s The Sleeping Beauty has greatly improved since I first saw it in 2007. I hope that in the future it will become even stronger with the addition of the fairytale characters’ divertissements in the final act of ABT’s The Sleeping Beauty.

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Many of us wanted to see Osipova and instead wound up with two tickets to see Cojocaru and Kobborg. It would be a huge plus for ABT customer relations if they would allow those of us with tickets for both performances to return one for credit to City Center or Nutcracker. Wishful thinking, I know, but what a huge gesture of goodwill towards loyal customers... and giving ABT a reputation as a company that cares about its loyal fans, unlike another nearby company, which will remain nameless.

Let's not forget ABT is the company that did not permit any exchanges for the day of that blizzard in Dec 2010 - you remember, the one where there was NO public transportation and we got about 20 inches of snow.

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There certainly does seem to be an element of unearned grace, as Waelsung says. I'm not so sure that there is nothing in the way of "character development." There are striking changes in Aurora, especially as expressed through her choreography, as she moves from the Birthday Scene to the Vision and Awakening Scenes to the Wedding Scene.

One of the strengths of Fonteyn's performance is that she was able to make each part of this development believable on its own, while convincing us that Aurora has become a much more serious, complex, and womanly character by the end. The final tableau -- with everyone posing prettily and Aurora and Desire, side by side, commanding center stage -- should not just be a pretty picture. It has to have dramatic impact, and it has to be earned.

I admit that I find quite a lot of "dramatic conflict" in SB. Fairies, witches, wicked minions, guardian fairies: all help wrench the world from Order to Chaos to the Restoration of Order, but of a more transcendent kind than at the start.

A cynic might say that this is a story line designed to send the Romanovs back to their palaces with tears in their eyes and smiles on their faces.

I am sure you are right in what you say in your last sentence.

However it seems to me that some of the comments in this thread miss a number of points.

In producing The Sleeping Beauty, Telyakovsky had simply picked up on what was an earlier tradition of setting the well-known tale as a ballet.

This was following the examples of, “La belle au bois dormant, “staged at The Opera, Paris in 1825 by Pierre Gardel with music by Michele Carafa. This was followed by Jean Pierre Aumer’s version with the same title again produced at The Opera in Paris in 1829 with music by Ferdinand Herold and designs by Pierre Ciceri . In 1833 a revision of Aumer’s production was staged by Anatole Petit at Drury Lane Theatre, London.

Of course there are spiritual overtones in this Petipa ballet as he was a Catholic, Telyakovsky and the ballets audience, were in the vast majority Russian Orthodox Christians. So a parallel of beliefs and values were required in this 1890 production.

I think we also have to remember that this ballet is quintessentially a paean to the Romanov dynasty and the gift of the Lilac Fairy to Aurora symbolises that she will be blessed with, beauty, pride, and youthful innocence. The idealised parallel being, that the children of the Imperial family arrive blessed by God.

As regards drama in this ballet, there are two powerful dramatic scenes that if played well capture evil nature of Carabosse.

I recall both Ray Powell and Alexander Grant giving outstanding performances as Carabosse and who were often as well received as the two/three principal characters. Anatole Gridin of the Kirov gave legendary performances in this same role clearly delineating the dramatic fight between darkness and light taking place in what is a seemingly (Goodly/Godly) protected kingdom.

1890, was a time (especially amongst Royal and Imperial families) when young women married as virgins and Telyakovsky and Petipa portray Aurora as being innocent and therefore, in a state of God's grace.

As Waelsung states, "Aurora's grace is not unearned, it is symbolically dignified by her status as was typical of characters in fairy tales. Aurora is born into a magic kingdom of light and goodness, and without having done anything either good or bad; she receives everything one can only dream of. Sin has no role to play here."

To contextualize evil as depicted in The Sleeping Beauty, the sheer venom of Carabosse, would resonate with that 1890 audience as symbolising the continuing existence of evil within Imperial Russia.

This had earlier been signified by the bomb placed in the Winter Palace in 1880 that killed eleven people and later followed by the subsequent assassination of Alexander II.

EDITED TO CLARIFY

PS

Regarding the Bolshoi couple they have been photographed in a studio in Southwark(London)rehearsing Romeo and Juliet.

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Many of us wanted to see Osipova and instead wound up with two tickets to see Cojocaru and Kobborg. It would be a huge plus for ABT customer relations if they would allow those of us with tickets for both performances to return one for credit to City Center or Nutcracker. Wishful thinking, I know, but what a huge gesture of goodwill towards loyal customers... and giving ABT a reputation as a company that cares about its loyal fans, unlike another nearby company, which will remain nameless.

Let's not forget ABT is the company that did not permit any exchanges for the day of that blizzard in Dec 2010 - you remember, the one where there was NO public transportation and we got about 20 inches of snow.

If companies were to refund tickets based on guaranteed casting, there would be no opera or ballet company in the world that would be in business. There's a reason for that fine print about casting subject to change.

I think over the years fans decide for themselves how much to trust the casting lists, especially when they are published well in advance, where illness, injury, overwork, etc. can't be anticipated (at least most of the time).

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Many of us wanted to see Osipova and instead wound up with two tickets to see Cojocaru and Kobborg. It would be a huge plus for ABT customer relations if they would allow those of us with tickets for both performances to return one for credit to City Center or Nutcracker. Wishful thinking, I know, but what a huge gesture of goodwill towards loyal customers... and giving ABT a reputation as a company that cares about its loyal fans, unlike another nearby company, which will remain nameless.

Let's not forget ABT is the company that did not permit any exchanges for the day of that blizzard in Dec 2010 - you remember, the one where there was NO public transportation and we got about 20 inches of snow.

If companies were to refund tickets based on guaranteed casting, there would be no opera or ballet company in the world that would be in business. There's a reason for that fine print about casting subject to change.

I think over the years fans decide for themselves how much to trust the casting lists, especially when they are published well in advance, where illness, injury, overwork, etc. can't be anticipated (at least most of the time).

I agree with Helene. ABT this season had a lot of cast changes and replacements, there is no way they could allow exchanges/credits. I understand the disappointment of those who ended up with 2 ticket to see the same cast, on the other hand I think ABT did as well as they could have replacing a star with a star.

I'm a little surprised Cojocaru & Kobborg were willing to do it. According to her website they did Giselle in Taipai on July 2.

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I'm interested to see if Irina does the wedding variation tonight. Last year in Los Angeles, she and Max skipped the solo variations in the wedding pas.

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Renata Pavam, IMO, was the standout among the fairies, at least in Act I.

I wholeheartedly agree! I am peeved that Macauley omitted her from the review. So what if she's not a soloist and doesn't fit nicely into his sentence about them and their "own distinctive fragrance"?! Hmmph! On the other hand, I am happy (if shocked) to see some positive words from him regarding the soloists, and perhaps all this really means is that Pavam should be promoted to soloist, pronto! :wink:

@ leonid (and others), I was completely ignorant of the political climate at the time of the initial staging of "Sleeping Beauty," so thank you for enlightening me. I don't really feel like ABT's production retains any of those dark undertones (or any undertones at all), though the next time I see the ballet "Sleeping Beauty" (which will not be this season), I will try to be cognizant of the history and symbolism!

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