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TCM to show "Mysterious House of Dr. C[oppelius] in May


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#1 bart

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 04:07 PM

TCM (Turner Classic Movies) will be showing a 1966 ballet film "The Mysterious House of Dr. C." Date and time are: May 13, 6:15 pm.

I had the sound off and missed all but the end of the promo. So I don't know what "based upon Coppelia" means. The choreography is credited to St.-Leon. (IMDB lists him under "other crew." :wink:)

Walter Slezak plays Dr. Coppelius. Checking the minimal information on IMDB, I found that the film was shot in Madrid. Choreography is Arthur St.-Leon's. The orchestra is from the Liceu of Barcelona. Swanhilda/Coppelia is Claudia Corday. Franz: Caj Selling.

Has anyone seen this film? Or do you have further information about it? I have it in my calendar and will be recoding it..

Turner Movie Channel listing:
http://www.tcm.com/t...se-of-Dr-C-The/

International Movie Data Base listing:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0060399/

#2 RUKen

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Posted 04 April 2011 - 05:27 PM

I copied the following from answers.com:

Walter Slezak plays Dr. Coppelius in this misleading titled fantasy feature. Not a horror flick as one might assume, The Mysterious House of Dr. C is a respectable adaptation of Ted and JoAnna Kneeland's ballet Coppelia. The non-dancing Slezak plays a daffy but essentially decent inventor who creates a "clockwork girl," who comes to life in the form of lovely American ballet star Claudia Corday. As the life-sized doll Swanilda, Corday is paired with Caj Selling of the Royal Swedish Ballet. A few beguiling animated sequences add icing to this spooky but nonthreatening confection. Mysterious House of Dr. C was one of a handful of films produced by Samuel Bronston after his fall from grace as King of the Historical Epics (El Cid, Fall of the Roman Empire, et. al.)

#3 volcanohunter

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Posted 08 April 2011 - 06:25 PM

Today I saw the spot for this on TCM also, and it was heavy on dancing: lots of pointe shoes, tulle and heel stamping. The page bart linked has a few brief clips from the film (which also includes cartoons!).
http://www.tcm.com/t...html#movieclips

#4 RUKen

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Posted 09 April 2011 - 02:08 PM

TCM (Turner Classic Movies) will be showing a 1966 ballet film "The Mysterious House of Dr. C." Date and time are: May 13, 6:15 pm.


This is also scheduled on TCM on Sunday, April 17th, at 8:00 pm.

#5 Bonnette

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 02:04 PM

On TCM tonight (April 17, 2011), "The Mysterious House of Dr. C" will be followed immediately (at 7:45 PM EDT) by "The Tales of Hoffmann," featuring Moira Shearer and Robert Helpmann (among many wonderful dancers).

#6 RUKen

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 02:54 PM

On TCM tonight (April 17, 2011), "The Mysterious House of Dr. C" will be followed immediately (at 7:45 PM EDT) by "The Tales of Hoffmann," featuring Moira Shearer and Robert Helpmann (among many wonderful dancers).


That should be 9:45 pm EDST for the start of Tales of Hoffman.

#7 Bonnette

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 03:08 PM

That should be 9:45 pm EDST for the start of Tales of Hoffman.

Yes! You are so right. Thank you for correcting this...my mistake just dawned on me and I came back to amend the post. Thanks again.

#8 volcanohunter

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 08:54 PM

I thought it was quite charming. Naturally, there was narration. Unfortunately, the narrators also recited occasional poems over the music, and, worse yet, sang some lyrics, too. I suppose there's nothing that remains uncorrupted once the film industry gets involved. But I thought there was more than enough to compensate, especially Claudia Corday's delightful heroine. (I was astonished that she could perform such beautiful fouettés while wearing an enormous bouffant.) I'm not at all sold on giving Coppelius a (young!) love interest, but someone must have thought that Walter Slezak couldn't come away empty handed. Personally, I never feel much sympathy for Coppelius, though I know that many people feel that the youngin's are too hard on him.

The choreography is credited entirely to Jo Anna Kneeland, though Alicia Markova is listed as an artistic consultant. Much of the ballet was rechoreographed, so I think that's fair. Like the orchestra, the ballet company came from the Liceu, and it was most agreeable to see real ballet dancers on the screen. So often what had passed for ballet in old musicals was beyond cringe-inducing. Here the dancing was presented pretty much straight. The film was shot on 70mm film, and the widescreen picture is spectacular.

So, in the U.S. the film was followed by Tales of Hoffmann. In Canada it was followed by Invitation to the Dance. Hooray! That's a lot more ballet than I've seen on TV in a very long time.

#9 liebs

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 05:31 AM

I was very impressed with Corday's dancing and charming personality. Apparently she danceed with Harkness Ballet.

#10 Bonnette

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 05:55 AM

I, too, thought that Corday was a delight...beautiful dancing, lovely mischievous twinkle, eloquent mime.

#11 Mel Johnson

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 06:10 AM

Yes, she was Claudia Cravey, a student of Jo Anna Kneeland. She and here sister Clara were both at Harkness.

#12 liebs

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 06:30 AM

Mel, can you tell us more about Kneeland?

#13 Mel Johnson

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 08:51 AM

Jo Anna was from South Africa, and came to Palm Beach, FL with husband Ted, where they ran the Royal Poinciana Playhouse. Jo Anna had been well-schooled in the British-based Cecchetti Society style of instruction, and she further codified it into a theory and philosophy of instruction and a further curriculum of kinesiology and movement analysis, which she copyrighted. She came to Harkness House in NYC, and there succeeded Patricia Wilde as the Head of instruction. Her colleagues and students are very well-distributed throughout the ballet community today. The Craveys were two of her best students.

#14 liebs

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 09:53 AM

Thank you!

#15 Bonnette

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 11:29 AM

My thanks, too, for this great information.


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