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NYC Ballet considers social media guidelinesWall Street Journal


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#61 Stecyk

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 07:03 PM

In a tangential and somewhat similar vein, John Galliano lost his court decision that he was unfairly dismissed.

 

John Galliano is a famous haute couture clothing designer. He made inappropriate remarks at a bar one night that cost him his job. Here's a New York Times article Dior Fires John Galliano After Bigotry Complaints. Today the website Fashionista published an article John Galliano Loses Unfair Dismissal Case Against Dior and His Namesake Label.



#62 Stecyk

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 08:23 PM

I expect that we'll see more high profile mishaps that are recorded in some fashion.

 

My recent posts in this thread have been meant as a conversation starter. What is permissible and what isn't? Is it only work related conduct that matters, or does our any (or all) of our conduct matter? Has technology and social media made a difference? And, now that almost everyone carries a cell phone with a camera and can upload mishaps to a social site, has that changed our environment or behavior? These are bigger questions than I can answer.

 

I have always found topics of this sort interesting. That is, there seems to be changes afoot. What does it mean to us? I suspect in prior years, your private life was your private life. Now, we seem to be witnessing a blurring of private and work lives.

 

Unless there is something dramatic, I will let this topic go.



#63 Helene

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 09:32 PM

I don't think there's any standard yet, to be honest.  I think that employers are playing it by ear.  It also depends on the industry. 

 

If a ballet company is trying to be edgy, it might encourage more outre things on social media, especially if there's a token outre person or two.  If it's more conservative, the same behavior would be frowned upon.



#64 Jayne

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 11:29 PM

Regarding Galliano, Vanity Fair published an article that examined his abuse / addiction to certain chemical concoctions.  Here is the curtailed version: 

 

http://www.vanityfai...rview-exclusive



#65 Stecyk

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 08:29 AM

Regarding Galliano, Vanity Fair published an article that examined his abuse / addiction to certain chemical concoctions.  Here is the curtailed version: 

 

http://www.vanityfai...rview-exclusive

Thank you for highlighting the Vanity Fair article. I am surprised that I missed it earlier.

 

I recall reading case studies, although different from the Galliano circumstances, about employers and employees drinking at off-site parties, and then bad things happening. Usually, the employer was held accountable.

 

As Helene mentioned, employers are coming to grips with social media and, probably too, on how other outside activities might affect an employer's reputation. I am sure that business, law, and ethics case studies are being now being written. This whole area is an interesting field of study.



#66 Stecyk

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 09:27 AM

I was listening to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The Current this morning. The topic of conversation was the vulgar confrontation by some young male bystanders of a Toronto television reporter Shauna Hunt. You can listen to the 22 minute podcast by following the prior link.

 

Here's a YouTube showing the incident: https://youtu.be/LKkAL1AEam8

 

One of the hecklers was fired from his job at Hydro One.

 

As part of the discussion, The Current discussed what right(s) a company has in terminating an employee for conduct outside of work.

 

The panelists are as listed below:

  • Daniel A. Lublin is a workplace law expert and a partner at Whitten & Lublin.
  • Kaveh Shahrooz is a lawyer who focuses on human rights issues and codes of conduct.
  • Alicia Versteegh is the co-director of the Toronto chapter of Hollaback, an anti-street harassment movement.

Generally speaking, I don't intend to keep this thread alive. However, I thought today's CBC discussion is good because there was a lawyer who discussed workplace law.



#67 Jayne

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 02:46 PM

Teachers get fired for behavior outside of the classroom, as do military members, and many others.  I think it's a tough thing to defend as an attorney.  I see companies becoming more and more sensitive to this issue in the future.   Modern technology should make us all behave better in public, but unfortunately people still drink alcohol and do stupid things. 

 

If a NYCB dancer made hateful comments towards Jews, similar to what John Galliano said (and caught on camera), I think the dancer would be terminated.  Especially in NYC. 



#68 sandik

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Posted 14 May 2015 - 05:01 PM

Sigh




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