Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Film Awards Season - 2010-2011"Black Swan" and other contenders


  • Please log in to reply
91 replies to this topic

#31 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 25 January 2011 - 11:30 AM

The Oscar nominations are out.

The British monarchy saga "The King's Speech" reigned at the Academy Awards with 12 nominations, including acting honors for Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter and Geoffrey Rush, positioning itself to challenge "The Social Network" for best picture.





#32 miliosr

miliosr

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,592 posts

Posted 30 January 2011 - 03:03 PM

Didn't want to create a new thread for this . . .

I saw True Grit today. I've never read the source book or seen the original film w/ John Wayne so I had nothing to compare it to walking into the theater. That being said, I enjoyed it very much. There is still life in the Western genre, provided the right elements are there!

Perhaps what I liked most about True Grit is that it avoids the revisionist tendencies which crept into the genre starting in the 1970s. The characters are believable precisely because they do not utter modern sentiments of belief or politically correct dogma. The characters are very funny at times but funny in an era-appropriate way.

The acting is very strong as you would imagine in a movie featuring Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon and (in a smaller part) Barry Pepper. Newcomer Hailee Steinfeld is outstanding as the 14-year-old protagonist and she holds her own with Bridges and Damon. The only disappointment to me was Josh Brolin as the villain who sets the train of events in motion. As the villain, he is rather blah (and is upstaged by Barry Pepper as the leader of the gang to which the Brolin character belongs.)

The cinematography is beautiful and and really conveys the majesty of the American frontier.

#33 Natalia

Natalia

    Rubies Circle

  • Foreign Correspondent
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,398 posts

Posted 31 January 2011 - 12:33 PM

Well, Portman won the SAG award last night for "Best Female Actor" for Black Swan. (Whatever happened to the word "Actress" - PC gone crazy?) At this stage, it would be a huge shock if she doesn't win the Oscar. She and ballet's-own Benjamin Millepied will be the 'it couple' of the night. (I always liked Millepied but I never imagined that he'd become an A-list celebrity like this!)

The King's Speech now seems to have surpassed The Social Network as the top pick for Best Film. Ditto Colin Firth for Best Actor (or, as known at the SAGs, "Best Male Actor").

#34 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 31 January 2011 - 02:11 PM

Well, Portman won the SAG award last night for "Best Female Actor" for Black Swan. (Whatever happened to the word "Actress" - PC gone crazy?)


Many prefer to be called plain "actor" rather than "actress" -- nobody calls female flyers "aviatrixes" any more, and "waitress" is also falling out of use. "Actress" can be more convenient in some contexts, but identifying women simply as actors is increasingly common now, as on the Charlie Rose show, for example. (If your doctor is a woman, she might bristle at the idea that she should really be called a doctress.)

In theory there is really no reason for the Best Actor/Actress categories to be separate, but the practice won't go away any time soon. There aren't as many meaty Oscar-bait roles available to female stars as for their male counterparts, and without the separate category representation of women as film acting award nominees would probably fall. So it's here to stay. "Best Female Actor" sounds a tad cumbersome, but I'm people would get used to it eventually.

Fortunately for Portman, there isn't much competition in the Oscar Best Actress category this year and she looks as close to a sure thing as we usually get. (Which is not to say that her fellow nominees gave bad performances, just that given the way these things go she is the likely choice.)

#35 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 31 January 2011 - 02:17 PM

Thanks for your review, miliosr. I remember the original "True Grit" as poor and sight unseen I'm sure this new one is an improvement. I would disagree respectfully about many of those revisionist westerns, which paved the way for a new realism in the genre.



#36 sidwich

sidwich

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 375 posts

Posted 31 January 2011 - 04:28 PM

The King's Speech now seems to have surpassed The Social Network as the top pick for Best Film. Ditto Colin Firth for Best Actor (or, as known at the SAGs, "Best Male Actor").


Probably not surprising. The King's Speech also has the advantage of being a European-history based, English-accented period piece which seems to be a type particularly beloved by Academy members which tend to skew older and may not be as familiar with the Facebook phenomenon.

#37 kfw

kfw

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,320 posts

Posted 31 January 2011 - 07:00 PM

(If your doctor is a woman, she might bristle at the idea that she should really be called a doctress.)

Doctors aren't qualified to treat this malady but not that one according to their gender however.

In theory there is really no reason for the Best Actor/Actress categories to be separate, but the practice won't go away any time soon.

The practice doubles the fun! :)

Anyhow, no disrespect to Portman, but if the categories were combined, I'd be rooting for Colin Firth.

#38 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 31 January 2011 - 07:16 PM

Doctors aren't qualified to treat this malady but not that one according to their gender however.


Some used to think they were, actually.

The term was originally "actor" for both sexes and didn't seem to cause any great confusion. I have no particular dog in this fight, merely pointing out that usages are changing, and for a performer to prefer to be called "actor," period is not unusual these days.

#39 Quiggin

Quiggin

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 839 posts

Posted 01 February 2011 - 12:27 AM

Poetess used to be used - and woman poet, as in the best woman poet of her generation.

Regarding the Academy awards, which I haven't followed in recent years, A. O. Scott wrote a piece about the neglect of world cinema by the Academy:

... worthy films are passed over all the time, but such puzzling and capricious neglect happens so often that it can be taken as a yearly reminder of the American film establishment’s systematic marginalization and misapprehension of much of world cinema.


A Golden Age of Foreign Films, Mostly Unseen

And did Manueol de Oliveira ever receive an acknowledgement from the Academy? How many years has he been making films now? His latest, the charmingly dry and small scaled "The Strange Case of Angelica" (or the strange case of Isaac), has a La Sylphide-like plot [warning: trailer does give away some of the little surprises in the film]:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVwnpN8HRA4

SYNOPSIS
Isaac is a young photographer living in a boarding house in Régua. In the middle of the night, he receives an urgent call from a wealthy family to come and take the last photograph of their daughter, Angelica, who died just a few days after her wedding.
Arriving at the house of mourning, Isaac gets his first glimpse of Angelica and is overwhelmed by her beauty. As soon as he looks at her through the lens of his camera, the young woman appears to come back to life just for him. Isaac instantly falls in love with her.
From that moment on, Angélica will haunt him night and day, until exhaustion.


*

Nice interview with Edgar Ramirez talking about "Carlos the Jackal", French language but you get a sense of his screen presence and how different the topics of this interview are, how serious and intense, compared to his English language ones.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlCmXAEE3-o&feature=related

#40 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 01 February 2011 - 06:45 AM

The Best Foreign Language Film category has its oddities because films are nominated by country. (There is in addition a strong bias toward movies of European provenance.) No doubt the Academy is remiss in that department but when the Oscars first began there was no recognition of foreign films at all, so baby steps. :)


Nice interview with Edgar Ramirez talking about "Carlos the Jackal", French language but you get a sense of his screen presence and how different the topics of this interview are, how serious and intense, compared to his English language ones.


Thank you for that clip. That's true of many non-English speaking actors - I think of Penelope Cruz, whose presence and affect are quite different and much more powerful in her Spanish-language films.

I don't believe de Oliveira has ever been nominated but cannot say for certain.

Sort of off topic, but I remember when The Motorcycle Diaries was nominated for Best Song (and Best Adapted Screenplay; it wasn't nominated for Foreign Language Film because it was a multinational production and could not be credited to one country). Antonio Banderas and Carlos Santana had previously taken the stage to butcher "Al Otro Lado Del Río" and when Jorge Drexler accepted his award he sang a few bars (as if to say, "It goes this way, clowns." Gael Garcia Bernal wouldn't show up at the ceremony because of the treatment of the song.)

As sidwich notes, "The King's Speech" is classic Oscar fodder, good of its kind If You Like That Sort of Thing. I thought "The Social Network" was fearfully overrated but if you think about it there's not much to choose between them, I guess. In other words, I'm finding it hard to care this year. :)



#41 Natalia

Natalia

    Rubies Circle

  • Foreign Correspondent
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,398 posts

Posted 01 February 2011 - 07:40 AM

Well, Portman won the SAG award last night for "Best Female Actor" for Black Swan. (Whatever happened to the word "Actress" - PC gone crazy?)

..."Best Female Actor" sounds a tad cumbersome, but I'm people would get used to it eventually.

....


I certainly hope not. Ladies should be Ladies and Gentlemen gentlemen forevah! :)

#42 Cygnet

Cygnet

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 734 posts

Posted 01 February 2011 - 03:54 PM

If Portman is drafting her Oscar remarks, *(ref: the SAG and Golden Globes she probably isn't), she should consider emulating, or better yet - quoting the following winners.

Sir Laurence Olivier, April 9, 1979.

Mr. President and Governors of the Academy, Committee Members, fellows, " '. . . my very noble and approved good masters,' " my colleagues, my friends, my fellow-students. In the great wealth, the great firmament of your nation's generosity, this particular choice may perhaps be found by future generations as a trifle eccentric, but the mere fact of it--the prodigal, pure, human kindness of it--must be seen as a beautiful star in that firmament which shines upon me at this moment, dazzling me a little, but filling me with warmth and the extraordinary elation, the euphoria that happens to so many of us at the first breath of the majestic glow of a new tomorrow. From the top of this moment, in the solace, in the kindly emotion that is charging my soul and my heart at this moment, I thank you for this great gift which lends me such a very splendid part in this, your glorious occasion. Thank you.


Joe Pesci,

It was my privilege, thank you".



William Holden,

"Thank you."



#43 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 08 February 2011 - 01:38 PM

Thanks for posting, Cygnet. I think Pesci and Holden come off better than Sir Larry, what with his firmaments, and all.

#44 abatt

abatt

    Sapphire Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,754 posts

Posted 14 February 2011 - 02:10 PM

I watched the BAFTA awards on BBC America last night. Portman won Best Actress for Black Swan. The director of that film accepted the award on her behalf, saying that due to her pregnancy she was unable to make the trip to London. The King's Speech swept the awards, winning Best Picture, Best British Picture, Best Actor for Colin Firth, Best Supporting Actor for Geoffrey Rush, and Best Supporting Actress for Helena Bonham Carter. The director of the Social Network won for Best Director.

#45 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,474 posts

Posted 14 February 2011 - 02:28 PM

The King's Speech is classic awards bait, as sidwich noted earlier, not that I think The Social Network necessarily towers above it. Nice to see that David Fincher, the director of the latter, received recognition for his skill in keeping Sorkin's yackety-yack from getting on your nerves too much.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):