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MCB Program I

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MIAMI CITY BALLET 2010/2011 SEASON

Program I

FANFARE

Choreography: Jerome Robbins

Music by Britten

Jerome Robbins’ tribute to Queen Elizabeth II – its premiere took place on the night of her Coronation in 1953 – is an enchantingly bright and goofy take on Benjamin Britten’s “The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra.”

BUGAKU

Choreography: George Balanchine

Music by Mayuzumi

Balanchine’s most erotic ballet, a highly stylized Japanese mating ritual, Bugaku was created on Allegra Kent and Edward Villella. One critic said it had “the subtlety of Japanese painting on silk, the strength of Japanese wrestlers.” Another described how “The lovers stalk each other with expressionless hunger.” A third suggested that it might well have been called The Deflowering.

THEME AND VARIATIONS

Choreography: George Balanchine

Music: P.I Tchaikovsky

Set in a spectacular 19th-century ballroom to the soaring music of Tchaikovsky, this is classical ballet at its grandest. The cast is large, the costumes lavish, the dancing elegant and joyous with strong, bold leaps and sharp, crisp moves. Long recognized as a Balanchine masterpiece!

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From the MCB blog it looks like the dancers are VERY happy to have the Opus One Orchestra Back!

MCB Blog

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While I think Villella's remarks about Theme and Variations, linked to just above, are helpful and good, the

serves its purpose pretty well, too, even providing glimpses of Catoya and (I'm sorry) one of the Serabias? in it. With all of the attention given to Bugaku on that thread, I'd just like to speak up for "T&V" as a better ballet to better music. I'm tickled that Tchaikovsky provided a sequence of four variations late in the piece which do admirably for the four parts of a classical pas de deux just as they stand, with no need of rearrangement. (Was this ballet "meant to happen"?)

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So now just a few hours left until curtain rises tonight!! yaaay!!! :yahoo:

I CAN'T WAIT to see Theme and Variations!. I haven't seen this little jewel of ballet live in years, and having the orchestra back makes it even more thrilling. I mean, is there any other opening that can give you more sense of grandeur with that timpani's exhilarating sound drumming in your ears...? (Perhaps one can compare it to the opening of the Swan Lake ballroom act...)It really makes you very alert and prepared for what's coming.

And then, I want to see how do they treat that PDD. Here we have one of the most beautiful melodies ever used for a duo, and so simple at the same time, with those 3/4 opening bars in pizzicatos, while the ballerina is basically walking over clouds, barely touching the floor while lifted and carried away by the danseur. In this sense, I can't really say which PDD is more beautiful, T&V or Diamonds.

To be honest, many times I imagine this ballet as the extended 4th Act of Sleeping Beauty, with Aurora, Desire and all the fairies and their attendants celebrating the wedding.

Could this be arranged like that at some point...? :lol:

Will report back...!!! :thumbsup:

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The resemblance or affinity to Sleeping Beauty didn't escape us in The Old Days, either, except that then, living in the land of Less is More, we reasoned that "T&V" was Balanchine's SB, not least for its hierarchy of soloists (the video shows the upper tier of four - the four fairies? - dancing downstage center at one point). He had his half-hour Swan Lake, a considerable improvement, but a most magical Nutcracker, which would have deprived us had it ben shortened. (Also in MCB's repertory.) His treatment of La Sylphide, according to this, was - is -Scotch Symphony, another ballet to be seen in MCB's programs this season. And so his one-time little troupe didn't need huge resources...

(Cristian, can you recognize Catoya's partner in the video?)

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(Cristian, can you recognize Catoya's partner in the video?)

Jumping in here, since Cristian is at the ballet watching this LIVE :thumbsup:, the video must be from the 2002-2003 season. The lead dancers are, I think, Jennifer Kronenberg and Eric Quillere.

The short promo for this season's T&V uses clips from that earlier video.

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Thanks, bart. Watching the clip at 1/4 speed with those identifications in mind, I think you're right. They are all just so good.

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The MCB blog has a cute couple of minutes with 4 corps women -- Sara Esty, Zoe Zien, Ashley Knox, and Leigh-Ann Esty -- talking about dancing Bugaku. There's a clip of Kent working with the corps (Haiyan Wu as the principal woman). I enjoy dancer perspectives: working with long capes and with wigs, for instance.

http://www.miamicityballet.org/blog/2010/10/15/bugaku-girl-talk/

This opportunity to prepare for a ballet, with posts from BT members, videos and insider stuff from the company, is wonderful. I've always thought that, when you are willing to do some work before the curtain rises, you can experience so much more during the actual performance.

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Just came back from the Arsht Center, and I must officially announce Jeanette Delgado as our Miamian very OWN T&V REIGNING QUEEN!!! :clapping::clapping::clapping::clapping: . Trying to put in words what I saw in tonight's performance I think would just be in vain...the only thing I DO really want to underline is that I BET Mme. Alonso would have been VERY proud of Miss Delgado if given the opportunity to see her dance her role. Renato Panteado did Youskevitch's honors, and also up to my standards :clapping: . It was simply BEAUTIFUL. Two thumbs up for having live music back, particularly in this ballet.

Sadly, I couldn't make it on time to see the first two ballets...even racing from Key Biscayne to Downtown, due to over extended working hours, but according to the program, the leads in Bugaku were Wu and Garcia-Rodriguez.

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Last night's offering was a little disappointing. I'll skip for now Bugaku and Fanfare, to concentrate on T&V-(will expand my views on those two later on). I don't know what could be the reason behind Jenniffer Kronemberg's bland rendition of Baurora-(Balanchine's Aurora :lightbulb: )-but I was two rows away from her, and she looked pretty tired. She lacked the intense attack to which that first series of pirouettes need to be treated, and ditto with the sequence of the three mini-diagonals of chainee turns in opposite directions. Her petite allegro, SOOO VITAL in this role, wasn't crispy, and so the magic of those sequences of entrechat/battu was totally lost. I kept thinking on how Balanchine obviously kept filling the the female variations with all this beautiful footwork, given that Alonso was famous for it-(right until the end of her career, and one can see it on those Grand Pas de Quatre or Giselle clips of the series of traveling entrechats for the second act, or at the end of the White Swan or Sugar Plum Adagios.

Ditto with Carlos Guerra's Besiree-( :wink: ). He tried his best, but he couldn't make it all nice and clean for that famous sequence of 7 double tours en l'air. Generally speaking, I saw a slowing down of the ballet, and this is a NO-NO for T&V. I kept thinking..."stop paying so much attention at lines, and port de bras and the perfect placement and ATTACK,ATTACK, ATTACK the music...this is not Giselle!!!"

Will continue.

Edited to add: Did I just say "Don't think and just dance..."?! :jawdrop:

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Some thoughts on Miami City Ballet's opening program this weekend:

I thought the program itself - Fanfare, Bugaku, and Theme and Variations - was well-chosen. Fanfare heralded the opening of MCB's 25th anniversary season as well as the return of live orchestral accompaniment, and was danced in spirited fashion. The costumes, while colorful, clever, and amusing, somewhat overwhelmed some of the smaller men. I thought the company shone in this ensemble piece, and looked particularly grand in the opening theme and closing fugue.

It was wonderful to see Bugaku danced by two casts (Haiyan Wu with Isanusi Garcia-Rodriguez and P. Delgado with R. Reyes) so fascinatingly different in physicality and tone. The pairing of Haiyan and Garcia-Rodriguez - her ultra-femininity and perfectly proportioned loveliness offset by his magnetism and powerful grace - left its imprint firmly in my mind. Although I am not old enough to have seen Allegra Kent in her heyday, this seems to contain her essence and perfume, in its beautiful evocation of feeling and form, and its slightly kitsch-ey style.

It is impossible to speak about Jeannette Delgado in the ballerina role in Theme and Variations without recalling the joy she transmits - to the audience and to the atmosphere on stage - through every glorious movement phrase. Her technical command of the role is a joy in and of itself, but her shimmering musicality, grandeur, and musicality are the stuff of long-term memory. She illuminated this great ballet.

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Very sorry that I missed these performance but will see it in West Palm when they close out this program.

Sonora

Which two of the performances did you see? Did Patricia dance at either?

Christian

I am looking forward to hearing your review of the other pieces on Saturday night.

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Did Patricia dance at either?

cahill, Patricia danced the lead of Bugaku on Saturday night with Reyneris Reyes. Today the cast was the same as Friday night, T&V with Jeanette/Panteado and Bugaku with Wu/Isanusi

Christian..I am looking forward to hearing your review of the other pieces on Saturday night.

Will do...! :thumbsup:

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Which two of the performances did you see? Did Patricia dance at either?

I saw Saturday night and Sunday matinee. Patricia Delgado danced Bugaku on Saturday and the Viola in Fanfare on Sunday. I thought she was lovely in Bugaku, with Reyes. Tricia Albertson danced the Viola on Saturday. She was charming, fleet, elegant.

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Cristian, I was interested in your very different responses to Jeanette Delgado and Jennifer Kronenberg in T&V. I've seen Kronenberg and Guerra dance this, both in full performance and in a closer-up workshop performance. I can certainly imagine that her approach -- large-scale and grand-imperial -- would be shocking after growing up with the Alonso approach, which is probably a version of what Balanchine originally intended. I like Kronenberg, but have found something lacking in her T&V. I think you have put your finger on what that is. Guerra is an appealing dancer in many roles, but it probably takes a Youskevitch 1947), Villella (1960 and 1971) or Baryshnikov to do real justice to the T&V cavalier.

One advantage (or disadvantage??) of a live orchestra is that the conductor can alter tempo to suit the dancer. You seemed to have witnessed an extreme version of tempo variation in those two contrasting performances. I wonder which performance the demi-soloists and corps dancers preferered?

Like you, I prefer speed and momentum, providing the dancer can keep the details clear and avoid blurring the details. Delgado is very good at that. (Gelsey Kirkland and Merrill Ashley were, too.)

Since this ballet was created for the strengths of Alonso (and, equally important, for the strengths of Youskevitch), I thought you might be interested in what B.H. Haggin wrote back at the time of the Ballet Theatre premiere in 1947.

... [W]hat Balanchine did for her in Theme and Variations was not merely to use everything she does best as a dancer -- her sharp attacks, her secure feats of point-balance, for exmple -- but to use them in a style that made her glamours and radiant.

Delgado's Sugar Plum Fairy at Arsht last season shows she is starting to develop real ballerina "glamour and radiance." She's not just a technician or a can-do girl any more.

I can't wait to see both Delgado and Kronenberg when MCB comes to the Kravis. (Assuming that the Gods of Casting are in a favorable mood, of course.)

By the way, if you have a copy of Arlene Croce's Going to the Dance, have a look at "From a Far Country," a 1978 piece that includes a long comparison of T&V and Sleeping Beauty (esp. the prologue and vision scene). Apparently Ballet Theatre asked Balanchine specifically for a work that would "fill the same function in the reportory as did Princess Aurora" (a suite of Sleeping Beauty excerpts).

The essay is not included in Writing in the Dark. P.M. me if you would like me to send you a photocopy.

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Cristian, I was interested in your very different responses to Jeanette Delgado and Jennifer Kronenberg in T&V. I've seen Kronenberg and Guerra dance this, both in full performance and in a closer-up workshop performance. I can certainly imagine that her approach -- large-scale and grand-imperial -- would be shocking after growing up with the Alonso approach, which is probably a version of what Balanchine originally intended. I like Kronenberg, but have found something lacking in her T&V. I think you have put your finger on what that is.

bart...but I wish I could describe Kronemberg's approach just as "large-scale" or "grand-imperial", but that was sadly not the case. I like her too, don't get me wrong, but her rendition of T&V was just...bland. There were segments in which she was just relying too much in the posing fact, minimizing speed, attack and sharpness, which at the end are the very basis of T&V's female variations. I notice that this is a phenomenon that's getting more and more extended within the ballet world, in which the dancers- (females AND males)-are dancing variations and pieces in a much more slower tempo than their predecessors. This could be a good thing, let's say, in the White Swan PDD or all the warhorses PDD adagios- (Nut, Black Swan, Bayadere, etc...)-but please, don't bring T&V into it...that's a crime. As I said, one just have to look at those clips from the past, where dancers like Dudinskaya- (Black Swan/Bayadere), Fonteyn- (Corsaire), Alonso- (Coppelia), Markova- (Giselle), Baronova- (Le Cock d'Or) or Chabukiani- (Flames...)-leave you jaw dropping, even at some point wondering..."is that video being sped up...?"-(like some thread I read a while ago about it)-with their magnificent offerings of devilish chainee turns, pique turns, pirouettes, fouettes and everything in between. Well...the result of this obsession to achieve the famous Russian/Soviet Kirov ballerinas perfect épaulement or "royal carriage"-(or as many refer to, the "perfect line" or to execute the step to a 150 % of perfection)-is a sad travesty, and many times a boring execution, to which the dancer becomes just another faceless one. Sometimes while looking at certain ballets and dancers I really believe that the ultimate goal of bailarines and bailarinas nowadays has changed, and giving an exciting performance has given way to given a perfect- (and many times ultra generic)- execution. I see T&V as probably the ultimate example of an EXCITING ballet...more than beautiful, grand or any other adjectives we could fairly add.

Guerra is an appealing dancer in many roles, but it probably takes a Youskevitch 1947), Villella (1960 and 1971) or Baryshnikov to do real justice to the T&V cavalier.

Yes...he wasn't really up to the role, IMO.

One advantage (or disadvantage??) of a live orchestra is that the conductor can alter tempo to suit the dancer. You seemed to have witnessed an extreme version of tempo variation in those two contrasting performances. I wonder which performance the demi-soloists and corps dancers preferred?

Probably the slow one. I noticed some of them struggling with the super fast final tableaux

Like you, I prefer speed and momentum, providing the dancer can keep the details clear and avoid blurring the details. Delgado is very good at that. (Gelsey Kirkland and Merrill Ashley were, too.)

Definitely, bart, and would I had been the stager, I would had sped the tempo even more...! :) (Believe me...she can take it)

Since this ballet was created for the strengths of Alonso (and, equally important, for the strengths of Youskevitch), I thought you might be interested in what B.H. Haggin wrote back at the time of the Ballet Theatre premiere in 1947.... "What Balanchine did for her in Theme and Variations was not merely to use everything she does best as a dancer -- her sharp attacks, her secure feats of point-balance, for example -- but to use them in a style that made her glamours and radiant".

Because she-(just as Kirkland, I assume by her brief clips)-had the formula to combine the two. Something that we're certainly loosing...sadly.

Delgado's Sugar Plum Fairy at Arsht last season shows she is starting to develop real ballerina "glamour and radiance." She's not just a technician or a can-do girl any more.

Oh, DEFINITELY. She has it...which is why I would LOVE to see her developing the other side of the ballet repertoire. At this point of her career it would be great if she could start working on her Giselles, Sylphs, Filles and the like, with their ample range of accents and characterization details.

I can't wait to see both Delgado and Kronenberg when MCB comes to the Kravis. (Assuming that the Gods of Casting are in a favorable mood, of course.)

I think they will repeat the same cast as here bart. Delgado/Panteado and Kronemberg/Guerra

By the way, if you have a copy of Arlene Croce's Going to the Dance, have a look at "From a Far Country," a 1978 piece that includes a long comparison of T&V and Sleeping Beauty (esp. the prologue and vision scene). Apparently Ballet Theatre asked Balanchine specifically for a work that would "fill the same function in the repertory as did Princess Aurora" (a suite of Sleeping Beauty excerpts). The essay is not included in Writing in the Dark. P.M. me if you would like me to send you a photocopy.

Oh yes...I want it!

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I just returned from London, and as I mentioned in my discussion of going to the exhibit at the Victoria and Albert Museum (about Diaghilev), I also got to see the Royal Ballet perform, and they closed the program with 'Theme and Variations." It was performed at a slightly slower tempo than the one(s) I am used to at New York City Ballet.

Miss Alonzo attended, and great tribute was paid to her both before the performance (of the whole program) began, and after T&V, when she was led onstage by Serge Polunin (who did the male lead, partnering Tamar Rojo, she of the exquisite feet) and Carlos Acosta. It was exciting and an honor to be present at this tribute

In the program notes by Zoe Anderson (which are quite good), they talk about its association with "Sleeping Beauty" at length. I thought I'd add a bit to this discussion by quoting from Ms. Anderson's notes:

"...Theme and Variations evokes Petipa's Sleeping Beauty. That link was planned from the beginning when the ballet was first commissioned by American Ballet Theatre. In 1947, complete performances of The Sleeping Beauty were still rare in the West. Petipa's ballet would not have its American premiere until 1949 when The Royal Ballet (still then called Sadler's Wells Ballet) brought its celebrated production to New York. American audiences knew the work through excerpts and suites, such as American Ballet Theatre's Princess Aurora. Following the suggestion of their music director, Max Goberman, Lucia Chase and Oliver Smith asked Balanchine if he could make a new work to this music, something like Princess Aurora with a starring role for Igor Youskevitch. Having looked at the score, Balanchine replied 'But of course.'"

Ms. Anderson then discusses several other ballets by Balanchine, including Mozartiana, 1933, and The Four Temperaments (1946) which are based on themes/variations. She continues,

"Balanchine's dances, like Tchaikovsky's music, suggest a similar emotional and dramatic range to that of the complete Sleeping Beauty. It also has more specific echos. The critic Arlene Croce summed up the ballerina's fast solo as "Aurora rewritten in lightning," full of dazzling references to Petipa solos."

Ms. Anderson also discusses the extreme technical demands on the man, and mentions that Balanchine's use of the line of women in the 7th variation, with no "cavaliers" supporting them may refer to versions that Balanchine may have seen in Russia, of the fairies in the prologue (who have no cavaliers in Soviet versions -- she is guessing that this was carried over from the Imperial days).

It is a long essay, and I'll also offer to scan and email it if anyone wants to see the complete piece.

The performance, by the way, was lovely (of course). I loved this tiny couple, thought she had the most beautiful instep in the world, but she had some difficulties executing the little egg-beater steps that I cannot spell any more than she could do them. Not many can.

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Cristian, I was interested in your very different responses to Jeanette Delgado and Jennifer Kronenberg in T&V. I've seen Kronenberg and Guerra dance this, both in full performance and in a closer-up workshop performance. I can certainly imagine that her approach -- large-scale and grand-imperial -- would be shocking after growing up with the Alonso approach, which is probably a version of what Balanchine originally intended. I

Like you, I prefer speed and momentum, providing the dancer can keep the details clear and avoid blurring the details. Delgado is very good at that. (Gelsey Kirkland and Merrill Ashley were, too.)

Since this ballet was created for the strengths of Alonso (and, equally important, for the strengths of Youskevitch), I thought you might be interested in what B.H. Haggin wrote back at the time of the Ballet Theatre premiere in 1947.

... [W]hat Balanchine did for her in Theme and Variations was not merely to use everything she does best as a dancer -- her sharp attacks, her secure feats of point-balance, for exmple -- but to use them in a style that made her glamours and radiant.

Delgado's Sugar Plum Fairy at Arsht last season shows she is starting to develop real ballerina "glamour and radiance." She's not just a technician or a can-do girl any more.

Ashley and Nichols were THE T&V ballerinas of their period (after Kirkland), as Ashley once (correctly) implied in an interview. (Cynthia Gregory was also great, I'm sure, though I never saw her dance it, alas) Croce also discusses the fact (in another book) that the T&V adagio is in fact a 'supported allegro'--perfect not only for Alonso but for Ashley. I imagine Delgado would be fab in this ballet--she has indeed become far more radiant with time--and hope to see her gargouillades in person (I assume, being the jumper she is, she does them? They were added for Kirkland, btw--not in Alonso's choreography) I like Kronenberg tremendously, but find her MUCH more convincing in parts other than Big Tutu Ballerina Roles; T&V and Bizet don't suit her well.

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The performance, by the way, was lovely (of course). I loved this tiny couple, thought she had the most beautiful instep in the world, but she had some difficulties executing the little egg-beater steps that I cannot spell any more than she could do them. Not many can.

ViolinConcerto, I'd very much like to read the full essay.

See the post that I just made about gargouillades (LOVE 'little eggbeater steps', lol). These were added for Kirkland, who of course could do anything, and were not in the original choreography; as such, they are optional (can't imagine the Trust or a repetiteur would force anyone to do them as they were added later--and since the sauts de basque almost NEVER appear in the Tschaikovsky Concerto finale any more....uggggghhh....)

and I'm surprised that a) Rojo had trouble with them and b) perfectionist that she usually is, that she didn't just omit them given that.

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Thanks, Viollin Concerto and jsmu, for your posts. I've always loved to know the background -- including performance background -- before attending a ballet. This has been a great thread.

Left behind, however, has been Fanfare, the third item on Program I.I first saw this when it was revived at NYCB in the 70s and remember enjoying it enormously, especially the score and the spirit of joie de vivre..

Critical response, however, has been tepid. For example, Jordan Levin of the Miami Herald:

As a way to welcome back live music, "Fanfare" seems better in concept than in reality. The 1953 ballet shows Robbins' Broadway side, rather uncomfortably mixed with ballet -- though not the subtle ballets of Robbins' later years. "Fanfare" looks a bit like '50s's movie musical, starting with the unfortunate Technicolor costumes in blue and orange and mustard, appliqu'd with different musical instruments, with big shiny crowns for the women and strange saucer-like hats for the men.

Edward Villella narrated Benjamin Britten's "Young People's Guide to the Orchestra", with the dancers as different instruments .... There's some fun comedy for the men -- Isanusi Garcia-Rodriquez, Renato Penteado and Carlos Guerra cavort entertainingly as the Percussion -- and a grand parade for the entire cast, but "Fanfare" is lightweight entertainment..

Sniff. Sniff. "Entertainment," yes. But "lightweight" is a relative term. We live in a culture of superficiality so superficial that much of it is instantly forgettable and disposable. Robbins and Britten did much better than that. (Edited to add: I just checked Rep in Review. One Mr. Porter is quoted as writing in the Financial Times, 1965, that this is a "coarse, musically insensitive piece with one or two good inventions that are not good enough to save it." If that is the great Andrew Porter, later to move to The New Yorker, I may have to reconsider my own memories. :speechless-smiley-003:)

I wonder how Villella will do as the Majordomo. A friend who has seen many performances of this in NYC recalls bigger performers, with bigger voices, in the role.

By the way, there's a blog video on the MCB website that includes clips of the current production. The context is another interview with the Delgado sisters. The actual performance clip is towards the end.

http://www.plumtv.co...ters/index.html

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When I get home i will try and generate something about Fanfare...(haven't forgotten your request, cahill! :thumbsup: )...and also on Bugaku. Robbins piece will present a challenge for me to write about though... :dry:

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Did Ms. Delgado do the gargouillades?

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FWIW, I'm with Andrew Porter and Jordan Levin - and B. H. Haggin - Fanfare is far from terrible, but the comic bits for the boys have been the best of it for me in the past - I haven't seen MCB in it yet, although I expect to in Ft. Lauderdale. An equally good "idea" that would have been better in reality? Just 'cause I can't think of one, doesn't mean there isn't any one in the repertory, and a virtue of that choice for MCB of course, is that it has lots of dancers in it - They like to dance! It shows! - and the ballet earns points from me for that, not to mention that Villella likes to get 'em out there on stage, too.

(Remember his immediate answer when someone asked him why he was taking Symphony in C to New York instead of "Ballet Imperial," which Catoya was performing sensationally at the time? "Because Ballet Imperial has one couple and Symphony in C has four!" I would have loved to have heard the New York audience's response to Catoya's dancing in Ballet Imperial, but I got plenty of satisfaction from their response to MCB as it was. Much more appropriate than the tepid reaction of the Florida audience.)

But it's Theme and Variations that's drawing me this time, and I wouldn't mind seeing Bugaku, weird though it is, come to something like the life it had when I saw Kent and Villella do it a few times years ago. She's coached it for MCB before (2005), and her return this time is interesting in the light of Villella's explanation at one of his pre-performance talks that normally they bring in some original-cast members for their company premier, which they tape, and then they use the tape for their revivals. This time Kent came back. (BTW, I think the woman in black with shoulder-length straight brown hair we see in the studio in the video clips is the company's main regisseur, Roma Sosenko.)

(That Kent coached La Sonnambula too inclines me more to see that. I'll be surprised if they've got somebody sailing onstage like gangbusters in that, like she used to do. I don't think I've ever seen it done like that since her time. The Sleepwalker is asleep, in a trance, but she's not a ghost or spirit or something. But this is getting ahead of the story...)

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While I'm rambling randomly, I'll add that I think "T&V" is a much stronger ballet than the previously-announced Stravinsky Violin Concerto, which disappeared from the schedule around the time "T& V" was announced, I think, and so that change makes the season stronger, but I still regret that there's not a single "leotard ballet" on the schedule now, unless one turns up as the so far unannounced "pas de deux" on Program II. Maybe we'll get one of those just-short-of-violent renditions of the Agon pas, a real "contest," or has someone caught a hint somewhere of what's actually in preparation? bart?

I seem to recall Villella complaining that the leotard ballets are "hard to sell," which makes me wonder all over again how they go about marketing MCB. Living in Chicago, I must be well out of range of much of it.

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I still regret that there's not a single "leotard ballet" on the schedule now,...

...but neither a single Petipa , Jack...! :crying:

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