Ray

NYCB Lineage

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In his latest review of Benjamin Millepied's work at NYCB , Alastair Macaulay asks, "Has he any voice of his own? Does he have things to show us in dance that are singular? Does he hear music theatrically? Does he reveal new aspects of his dancers? What aspects of drama does Millepied dance theater have to offer?" and self-replies "Sorry, but my answer to those questions remains a blank."

Looks like Peter Martins has sprouted an heir.

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Not quite. Most of Martins' ballets are wars of the sexes. Not so, at least so far, with Millepied.

I actually had the same complaint that Macaulay aims at Millepied at Wheeldon, quite a bit further into his career. How do I know a Wheeldon work when I see one, but for the credit under the title?

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I actually had the same complaint that Macaulay aims at Millepied at Wheeldon, quite a bit further into his career. How do I know a Wheeldon work when I see one, but for the credit under the title?

I see your point, but to me at least one difference is that with Wheeldon I often feel thought underlying the works -- he's trying a new thing, often, and you can see a choreographer testing himself outside his comfort zone and trying to understand how a different kind of ballet works. This was particularly true for me in his early "leotard" works, like Polyphonia. His work also carries with it a sense of context/ballet history.

With Millipied I rarely get any sense of stretching or deliberate learning/effort. he's just doing what he can do and not questioning or thinking. (that said, I much preferred Plainspoken, which i saw this Sunday, to most of his other ballets I have seen. so maybe he's growing a bit?)

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