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MCB films PBS Great Performances specialCorps member blogs about the experience


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#61 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 10:34 AM

Cerdeiro, in my humble opinion, is a dancer that has been pushed a little too fast to Soloist. He can take the light Balanchine roles fine, no doubt, but for the heavy sets, even those of Balanchine, I don't think he's still prepared. He was casted last season in the Balanchine/Villella staging of Diane&Actaeon, and even being this staging somehow watered down technically from the original, he wasn't up to the challenge. Kleber Rebello is also a Soloist, and he's definitely superior in his dancing. Also, from the past I remember "The Lifter" of the company, soloist Daniel Baker-(now sadly gone)-who wasn't offered many solos during his tenure in Miami and still was also superior than Cerdero.

#62 4mrdncr

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 11:59 AM

Ok, the truth is I found the editing of Square Dance extremely choppy, with several 'holes' in continuity that actually made my stomach turn at one point. I couldn't decide what I didn't like about the diagonal views except that the height was different from how I shot, and maybe that's why it didn't work for me. But I love the music and choreography and the dancers were okay--but agree about the male solo, and Delgado's grin (which I noticed, and wished I didn't.)

Solid Gold dancers indeed. I (unfortunately) still remember that show and can see the similarity, but as I said, still wondered why her choreography of this has been copied so often in more recent contemporary work by others?

I must admit I fell asleep at one point in the middle of WS. The diagonals in that only worked once or twice, and I don't think the editing improved at all. So overall, I too was surprised and disappointed that Diamond and Bhargava did what they did. I also noticed the 'cramped studio' which may have affected a lot of things.

Whew! I feel so much better getting that off my chest!

PS. I was v. glad this was broadcast on Oct.28th here because I was not able to tape it, or see any repeats because I have been without heat or power since the Oct. 29th blizzard knocked down a tree into my drive taking down all wiring. (I am getting very tired of eating pbj's!) I heard a policeman say that after Springfield, MA has now experienced a tornado, microburst, earthquake, flood, and now iver 700,000 without power, the only thing left is for them to discover a volcano in my back yard. Happy Halloween!

#63 bart

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 03:33 PM

4mrdncr, I remember those early- and late-season heavy snows and what they can do to power lines. I hope everything is returned to normal for your and for all the others, soon.

Cristian, I also remember the Diana and Acteon pdd and agree with you that Cerdeiro is being pushed possibly too quickly. I also agree, with atm711, that he has exceptional promise. He reminds me of one of those adolescents who have growth spurts leaving them with exceptionally long arms and legs, but not (yet) the central core strength to control them perfectly. Right now, Rebello is indeed the more satisfying stage performer, though in a more limited and appropriate rep. In the future, who knows?

Just watched all three ballets a second time. I found myself delighting in Square Dance even more. I've also been grateful for the ability of modern cameras to capture even the tiniest detail precisely. All those beats! We have just have threads linking to two televised performances from the 1950s: Tallchief's Pas de Dix and Fonteyn's Sleeping Beauty. These are remarkable performances. But the feet become blurred in batterie, a very great loss..

I seem to be in a small minority here in actually liking the Tharp. I recall what a powerhouse of non-stop motion it was on stage, an effect lost for the most part on the television screen. The dancers were literally throwing themselves around in controlled abandon. And with attitude. Baker, Penteado, Albertson, and Esty really got it right this time around.

I don't get the criticisms to the effect that this is a "dated" work. It is, of course, of its time. But what more recent contemporary choreography has superseded it? It's not deep and doesn't pretend to be. But what contemporary choreography is? It continues to thrill audiences. And, speaking as one who has seen it on various subscription programs about 8 times over the past few years, there's always something new to look at.

#64 SandyMcKean

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 03:49 PM

Just to throw another 2 cents in the pot........

1. Overall, I loved the way MCB dances: quality, joy, technical skills, spirit, interpretation of Mr B........(I guess with a company like this, I could live in Miami after all Posted Image ).

2. I more or less hated the camera work. Maybe this isn't so much a problem of the director and the other camera influencing folks, but rather that it is just impossible to capture dance properly on video. But having said that, frankly, I still think the direction could have been better. You can't cut it up so much; you can't restrict us, the viewers, from so much of the action so much of the time. (P.S. I remember when I first saw the MET-HD operas in their first season and into the second, I didn't like the camera work. I kept saying myself...."STOP moving the camera.....just sit there.") Well, I got used to it, and I think the directors got MUCH better at it. Now I love how it works at the Met. But you can effectively go in close in opera since the action is so often in just one spot.....dance is a whole other ball game.)

#65 emilienne

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 05:09 PM

In the style of the above...:)

1. The recording of Western Symphony was oddly mixed and sounded like the orchestra was playing at the deep end of a cave.

2. The music for Square Dance fared much better. I really enjoyed the tautness of the Badinerie...most CD recordings of it tend to go for lot of echo to make it sound more heavenly (or something). Jeanette Delgado danced divinely - her dancing reminds me of the little that I've seen of Verdy: the same sense of 'chicness' in the phrasing (also the way she holds herself) and the sheer joy to be dancing. Unfortunately my attention occasionally wandered away to count "1-2-3-4-5-6-7-AND new camera angle!" to myself.

3. I haven't been able to bring myself to watch The Golden Section.

#66 kfw

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Posted 01 November 2011 - 06:08 PM

1. The recording of Western Symphony was oddly mixed and sounded like the orchestra was playing at the deep end of a cave.


Distracting camera work and hard to hear music - it's hard to believe this was really PBS in 2011, and sad to think how much better a record we might have been given.

Solid Gold dancers


What an apt description, except that they never had a soundtrack by David Byrne.

#67 dirac

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 04:36 PM

I seem to be in a small minority here in actually liking the Tharp. I recall what a powerhouse of non-stop motion it was on stage, an effect lost for the most part on the television screen. The dancers were literally throwing themselves around in controlled abandon. And with attitude. Baker, Penteado, Albertson, and Esty really got it right this time around.

I don't get the criticisms to the effect that this is a "dated" work. It is, of course, of its time. But what more recent contemporary choreography has superseded it? It's not deep and doesn't pretend to be. But what contemporary choreography is? It continues to thrill audiences. And, speaking as one who has seen it on various subscription programs about 8 times over the past few years, there's always something new to look at.


I too am a little surprised by the lack of love for "The Golden Section." I didn't much care for it here as a bit of television, but it was no fault of Tharp or the dancers (or Byrne's score, a very effective piece of rock for a theatrical setting).


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