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Julie Kent, Marcelo Gomes, Sarah SmithGuesting with Boca Ballet Theatre


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#46 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 02 August 2010 - 09:44 PM

Kyeong is right. I also couldn't help but noticing everything was going on between Albrecht and Giselle-(or perhaps Gomes and Kent...? :wink: )-during the Pas de Trois. They kept looking at the villagers dancing with visible pleasure, and also playing with one another. At several points I even caught Kent smiling and whispering in Gomes ear-(I think they were evaluating the performance of the students). Kent also took out her wreath from her head, and on Sunday she even plucked a grape and placed it in Gomes mouth...a gesture that I think caught him out of guard... :)

#47 Kyeong

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Posted 03 August 2010 - 03:18 AM

Kent also took out her wreath from her head, and on Sunday she even plucked a grape and placed it in Gomes mouth...a gesture that I think caught him out of guard... :)


Right. It was a little surprise that Kent, not Gomes, first put a grape in the partner's mouth playfully.

cubanmiamiboy, I totally agree with your impression like this: "He even had the audacity to portray the playboy...the guy who just wants to play with the poor girls’ heart. His gesture and devilish smile after Giselle is dragged in the house by Berthe was saying “Ha,ha…what a silly lovely girl to play with…”.

After reading a discussion about "Is Albrecht a cad" in Giselle forum, I was curious to see what Gomes's Albrecht would be like. More generally, I have wondered when and how Gomes will portray a mean and/or frail guy, not a consistently ardent lover, since I saw his Armand and Bolle's, and specifically in Albrecht's case, I think a cad-like Albrecht may have far more striking impact, let alone it will be more true to the 'love-me-love-me-not' flower scene, which I think indicates Albrecht's fate.

It seemed like that on the first day, Gomes’s starting point was far closer to a cad, while on the third day, he was in pure love from the beginning as NYT reviewer wrote in 2009, “he’s in this village because he’s in love.” Thinking of his these different Albrechts, and further, three Romeos of the past spring season, I guess that he is trying to expand his dancing/acting range to include a cad. While I was anxious to see it, now I wish him to stay further and show us more of this romantic one, as his Albrecht was so poetically beautiful. I am more than happy to finish "my" first ballet season by Kent and Gomes's Giselle, by their soul-touching PdDs in the first and the second act.


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