abatt

Ashley Bouder Makes The Front Page of the NY Times

221 posts in this topic

Does anyone mind if I do a volte face on my previous stance on Tweeting and the arts. Ban it ban it ban it.

Not at all, Simon, just go ahead and abandon your allies at a pivotal moment in the battle. Lord Stanley, I presume?

I'm a child of divorce and have trust issues. 'kay?

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Innopac's post is even more alarming than I realized about these addictions. I guess it was 3 months ago I heard about Facebook suicide, now we have 'shareware applications', which, if they discipline your net surfing addictions, are still part of the net. How effective can that be? More people are living on it than I thought. Although I couldn't live without wiki; I just found out positively which ones out in the spring are cherry blossoms, so it does cure retardation as well (yes, I seriously wasn't sure which ones were, and it was really bugging me, even though those are not my very favourites.)

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http://www.loc.gov/tweet/how-tweet-it-is.html

Yes, now all the privacy is gone. This has been a public service announcement.

When Facebook came out, there was lots of blogging about how there was a lot of information-gathering, more than MySpace, I think, but I can't remember. So--no such thing as a private tweet. I wouldn't do it for that reason alone, since it probably gets into personal data, not gossippy type stuff, more hardcore matters about one's financial habits, etc. Forget it. Lots of blog stuff gets archived, but it doesn't usually stay on there forever, and that doesn't matter so much if you don't put any security details on there.

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More on tweeting -- The April 19 New Yorker has a cartoon (not available online as far as I can tell, but on page 95 of the print edition) in which we see a baseball player, standing with a bat over his shoulder and tweeting in front of a stadium full of fans. He says:

hey fans! im at bat,. btm 9th, bases loaded, score tied -- oops, jst got called strike1

At least he's not driving a car. Or doing 32 fouettes.

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Are all the Tweets really being archived by the Library of Congress? I couldn't really have heard that this morning... must have been sleeping.

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From Mel's Link:

That’s right. Every public tweet, ever, since Twitter’s inception in March 2006, will be archived digitally at the Library of Congress. That’s a LOT of tweets, by the way: Twitter processes more than 50 million tweets every day, with the total numbering in the billions.

:)

So I no longer have to ... um ... WRITE A BOOK or something like that to be collected by the Library of Congress! Do you suppose every tweet has it's own listing in the catalogue? Fame at last!

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(quoting above quote...)

Every public tweet, ever, since Twitter’s inception in March 2006, will be archived digitally at the Library of Congress. That’s a LOT of tweets, by the way: Twitter processes more than 50 million tweets every day, with the total numbering in the billions.

wow. What a waste of resources.

-d-

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I can't get it out of my mind that this collecting of tweets will be used by some curator of some folklore museum somewhere to justify the collecting of walls from public restrooms. Not just the inscriptions, the actual walls themselves.

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I'm disappointed that this tweeting discussion (most of it negative) is still going on.

It really seems to me like this thread is now beating a dead horse.

For those that don't like/get/enjoy tweeting -- don't do it and don't read tweets.

Others (including me) see twittering as another marketing tool (albeit, still in its infancy).

From what I've read on this thread people keep repeating themselves.

Can we go back to discussing ballet?

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I can't get it out of my mind that this collecting of tweets will be used by some curator of some folklore museum somewhere to justify the collecting of walls from public restrooms. Not just the inscriptions, the actual walls themselves.

Well if they're going to collect tweets, they ought to collect Ballet Talk posts too. Let's take to the streets! :)

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:) That's right, let's claim our rights under the 14th Amendment: Equal Protection! Let's all make big signs and go to our next Tea Party and whip up the anarchy! "BALLET TALK TO LOC!!!"

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Can we go back to discussing ballet?
I understand the sentiment, though articles about tweeting have been appearing more and more all over the media. However, we have abandoned Ms. Bouder and probably should split off the last few pages of discussion to another, non-ballet part of Ballet Talk.

If there is demand for such a split, I'll be happy to do it. In the meantime, thank goodness, there are still plenty of bona fide ballet discussions going on all over Ballet Talk. :)

As one who actually is enjoying the conversation, I have questions for Mel, kfw and others. If the Library of Congress is empowered to collect tweets and make them available for scrutiny, doesn't this imply that they are some form of public communication or in the public domain.? Would, for example, a government agency be entitled to collect recordings of telephone conversations and make THEM available to the general public? Or, is there something in the Twitter contract that gives them ownership of content, so that -- in tweeting -- one gives up the right to control future use of one's tweet?

As to including Ballet Talk in the Library of Congress: wouldn't that limit us to 140 characters per post? 99% of us would be eliminated, if that were the rule. Maybe it's time to learn how to translate, abbreviate, and compress.

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If the Library of Congress is empowered to collect tweets and make them available for scrutiny, doesn't this imply that they are some form of public communication or in the public domain.? Would, for example, a government agency be entitled to collect recordings of telephone conversations and make THEM available to the general public? Or, is there something in the Twitter contract that gives them ownership of content, so that -- in tweeting -- one gives up the right to control future use of ones tweet?

Aren't tweets and Internet posts by nature public? Anyone can read them online. But the Twitter privacy policy does say that

Our default is almost always to make the information you provide public but we generally give you settings to make the information more private if you want.
.

Also,

We may share or disclose your non-private, aggregated or otherwise non-personal information, such as your public Tweets or the number of users who clicked on a particular link (even if only one did).

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That's right. Twitter is by its very nature public information, put out in the clear for anyone to access. It is therefore logical for a library to collect such information in the interest of its preservation. Besides, the donor has offered it, presumably, in "final form", with confidential and inhouse conversations deleted. Ballet Talk could do that, too, if we wanted to. The inhouse matter could be left out of what was offered for preservation or not as the donor(s) prefer.

The restroom collection at a museum is really very much the same thing, not just single examples (that's already been done), but an entire dedicated collection of walls from everywhere. It would make for a very interesting conservation and housing challenge. And then there are the "creator's rights" issues.... :)

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Thanks, kfw, for that research. I guess that those tweeters who selected the privacy option are OUT of the Library of Congress. Or are they?

Mel, your image of the library of the future reminds me of the old Borges story, "The Library of Babel." Almost every communication is stored there -- vast undigested quantities, ultimately unusable and meaningless. Fun for browsing, though, I would imagine, and a goldmine for future graduate students.

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That's where my sort of job comes in. I have the curatorial slot at a history museum with a library and an archive. In archival holdings, the institution collects, preserves and holds onto donations in such form as the donor gives them. In a library, usually works collected are in final form. Museums collect, conserve and retain objects for examination and interpretation by scholars in the advancing present and future.

We may not know right now what something means, but at some time to come, somebody using the infinite monkey theory of interpretation will say, "AHA!"

As you can see, there's a lot of crossover, and that has contributed mightily to my own personal collection of gray hair - also bald spots where I've torn it out. Which hat is collecting what?

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Almost every communication is stored there -- vast undigested quantities, ultimately unusable and meaningless. Fun for browsing, though, I would imagine, and a goldmine for future graduate students.

What's the Salt Lake City Mormon collection of data then? Isn't that the serious stuff?

Anyway, found this comment by a professor friend who is not really worried (but why would one worry at this point? it's irreversible): "It’s dumb – it will only encourage some English PhD to do a dissertation on “The deconstruction of tweeting in post-Facebook world” or some useless ---- like that (yes, I have an opinion, ---damnit)…"

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Agree with Deborah that it's probably good marketing in general (at least temporarily and for maybe a few more years), but still find it ironic that it was somehow this thread that sold me 2 tickets to see Ashton at ABT, while at least purporting to sell me on various TwitterSites. Never have seen Ms. Part or Mr. Hallberg or Ms. Vishneva, no, not even on tape or DVD. But then, what the Tweeting system be without a few paleo curios left? The problem could be that the Tweeting doesn't really lead you to live performance after you do a certain amount of it, just like the rest of internet activity. I think that's likely, that it will lead to more tweeting, and will sell more Twitter, because most of the technology is designed to propagate itself: There are surely plenty of people who are satisfied with YouTubes and have reduced all their live performance attendance. That's another dissertation, but by the time you've finished one of those, it's out of date. I can't believe there were ever actually courses in WordPerfect.

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I'm disappointed that this tweeting discussion (most of it negative) is still going on.

It really seems to me like this thread is now beating a dead horse.

For those that don't like/get/enjoy tweeting -- don't do it and don't read tweets.

Others (including me) see twittering as another marketing tool (albeit, still in its infancy).

From what I've read on this thread people keep repeating themselves.

Can we go back to discussing ballet?

It is rather like those zombie movies where the thing keeps coming at you until you shoot it in the head, isn't it? :) But as long as posters find it interesting they're free to post and carry on a discussion. The Tweeters will keep on tweeting no matter what we say here and good for them.

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I'm disappointed that this tweeting discussion (most of it negative) is still going on.

It really seems to me like this thread is now beating a dead horse.

For those that don't like/get/enjoy tweeting -- don't do it and don't read tweets.

Others (including me) see twittering as another marketing tool (albeit, still in its infancy).

From what I've read on this thread people keep repeating themselves.

Can we go back to discussing ballet?

It is rather like those zombie movies where the thing keeps coming at you until you shoot it in the head, isn't it? :) But as long as posters find it interesting they're free to post and carry on a discussion. The Tweeters will keep on tweeting no matter what we say here and good for them.

...and lest we forget, www.twitter.com/planetjedward

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