Jump to content


Three By DoveCasting, News, Reviews


  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#16 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,526 posts

Posted 22 March 2010 - 08:08 AM

I was seated a little closer to the woman with the lengthy question on Friday night during the Q/A....

I could not hear her well; I missed much of what she said. So she did eventually ask a question then. Do you remember what her actual question was?


My bad -- it wasn't so much a question as looking for agreement with her point of view. The rising inflection at the end of a sentence that is so popular now makes everything sound like a question even when it is not.

#17 SandyMcKean

SandyMcKean

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 940 posts

Posted 28 March 2010 - 09:50 PM

Quijada's work is based on contact improvisation, a dance practice that puts an incredible emphasis on the egalitarian quality of partnerships.....

Thank you for this comment Sandi. Since I never heard the term "contact improvisation" before, I looked it up in Wikipedia. The definition it gave was:

"Contact improvisation (CI) is a dance technique in which points of physical contact provide the starting point for exploration through movement improvisation"

I've seen this "3 by Dove" program at PNB 3 times now. The first time I saw Quijada's "Suspension of Disbelief" I only had a mild understanding of it. Between that 1st and the 2nd viewing, I read your comment above. What a difference it made to see this work knowing this distinction of contact improvisation!! It was like turning a black and white into technicolor.....so thanks for that.

BTW, I absolutely loved this program (altho the Quijada piece was my least favorite). The Dove pieces may not be ballet in the strict sense; and the choreography may not contain the elements we normally look for in great choreography (altho perhaps it does), but regardless I thought the Dove works were some of the most powerful dramatic dance -- to make up a term -- that I have ever seen......especially the last piece "Serious Pleasures". I like all the Dove works in PNB's rep, but I find "Serious Pleasures" to be particularly moving and expressive. I am grateful that Peter Boal has rescued this work from oblivion. (Incidentally, I asked if Boal plans to do the work again in future seasons, he assured me he was planning on do just that; and interestingly, he mentioned that the piece has gotten better audience response than he had expected.)

There is much I could say about this remarkable program, but I will only take the time to mention one: Lucien Postlewaite as the Narrator in "Serious Pleasures" was perhaps the single most amazing display of what's possible in dance that I have ever seen. He not only creates character and motivation for his every move, and for the very reason of each moment, but as many dancers can do, he commands the stage.....but what few dancers can do, and what Lucien seems to do in everything he does, and particualrly in this role, is command the entire theater, and perhaps command the space within 6 blocks of the theater in every direction. He doesn't just dance, he IS.

#18 Jayne

Jayne

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 870 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:03 AM

My belated review, which I will post on sections, as my new laptop keeps "accidentally" deleting my half-written posts......I think due to a hyper sensitive touch board, that I am still getting used to...

I saw the March 28 matinee (last performance)

Vespers
Loved it, Carrie Imler and Kaori Nakamura were the lead dancers. Everyone threw themselves into the choreography. I did long to see Alvin Ailey's troupe perform it. Fortunately YouTube.

#19 Jayne

Jayne

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 870 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:09 AM

Red Angels
By far my favorite, it was dance boiled down to the purely visceral experience. I was fortunate to see Kiyon Gaines debut in the 1st lead, and had an amazing performance. I think he has a charisma that cannot be coached, it is simply a gift from above. Andrew Bartee took the role Peter Boal originated. He was wobbly the famous balance arabesque, but worse for me, he maintained a half-grin throughout. I don't know if that is simply his expression when executing strenuous moves, or if he was trying not to laugh at an off-stage dancer. I understand from PNB dancers that they try to maintain some levity off stage to deal with the pressure. It was distracting.

The women were both technically great, and maintained the super serious demeanor required for the piece. Lindsi Dec is having a break out year. She is the quintessential Balanchine dancer -- slim, tall, hyper flexible, beautiful face, and she performed in all 4 pieces. Rachel Foster was strong, but I don't remember specifics about her performance (it's been 7 days).

#20 Jayne

Jayne

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 870 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:17 AM

Suspension of Disbelief
Meh. I didn't dislike it, but I wouldn't see it a 3rd time (I saw it in 2006 as well). It just looked unfinished to me, like an attempt at Jerome Robbins fight scenes 2.0 for the 21st century. The set reveals to the barebones stage was interesting, but also distracting from the dance itself.

Serious Pleasures
The doors reminded me of Amsterdam or Frankfurt's Red Light Districts (yes, I've walked through both, but during the daytime, and no, I didn't buy anything). I enjoyed this and would see it again. It seemed like a much longer dance than the others. Jonathan Poretta was the and he was great in a very athletically demanding role. Although one could say that of any Ulysses Dove creation. But. this one had more hairography. Wish I could have seen ABT perform the original. BTW the sexual warnings were overblown, the sexual content was far more subtle than the R+J performed last autumn.

#21 Jayne

Jayne

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 870 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:31 AM

I attended the post performance Q&A. Lindsi Dec and Kiyon Gaines were the featured dancers. Both are well spoken, friendly, and full of good humor. They mentioned that Victor Quijada made them mix tapes to play on ipods to get into the mood of break dancing, and how they had to reset their postures lower than traditional ballet requires. They also noted at the first few performances they weren't sure what to do with themselves when all the scenery is taken away, revealing the full stage. What was the proper etiquette? ok to drink water? stretch? move around to keep your body warm? But Kiyon said by the end, they were fully relaxed off stage, scratching the itches, adjusting costumes, etc.

Most of the discussion was about Serious Pleasures. Peter said they had 2 videotapes to work from, one was a grainy back of orchestra level filming, where he couldn't really see if foot placement was in front or back. The second was a hand held audience member, a friend of an ABT dancer. But he feared the ushers would catch him, so there were some good shots of the performance, followed by the camera showing his shoes, then back on stage, then the shoes....

Kiyon said the stage set was only ready 3 days before the first performance. They had a 1 door mock up to work with in studio, but not the full stage. Behind each door a red and green light is rigged, so the dancers know when to come onto stage. But Kiyon noted there were a few miscues during the first weekend. Dancers entering / exiting the wrong doors! Whispers of "you're in my door!" and then internally freaking out to find the right door.

#22 Jayne

Jayne

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 870 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:39 AM

At the start of Q&A Peter introduced the dancers and their biographies. I had previously noted to my seat mate at intermission that Kiyon has been a corps member for 9+ years, yet gets solo parts, yet isn't classified as a soloist. So many other dancers have been promoted, but why not him?

So....at the end of Q&A, I raised my hand and Peter called on me. I sad I had a 2 part question. First - has the Dove family ever come to see performances of his work at PNB? Peter nodded yes. Second - I am putting Peter on the spot here, I think Kiyon is an amazing dancer, and (with emphasis) when are you going to promote him???

The audience laughed and clapped loudly in agreement. Peter chuckled and said dancers' agents will be banned from future Q&A sessions. But that I should go ahead and hold my breath, because he agreed that Kiyon is fantastic, and that then made a few more cryptic remarks about wait and see.

I'm pretty proud of myself for asking as an audience member, I have nothing to lose. What is Peter going to do? Yank my season tickets?

#23 Jayne

Jayne

    Gold Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 870 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:43 AM

I was seated a little closer to the woman with the lengthy question on Friday night during the Q/A....

I could not hear her well; I missed much of what she said. So she did eventually ask a question then. Do you remember what her actual question was?


My bad -- it wasn't so much a question as looking for agreement with her point of view. The rising inflection at the end of a sentence that is so popular now makes everything sound like a question even when it is not.

At the Q&A I attended, there were many lengthy statements, without any real questions. I wished we were in court, so I could rise up and say "Objection, your honor. Is there a question for the witness, or has opposing counsel moved on to closing arguments?"

someone needs to emphasize Brevity and actual questions at the start of these Q&A's.

#24 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,526 posts

Posted 03 April 2010 - 10:21 PM

At the Q&A I attended, there were many lengthy statements, without any real questions. I wished we were in court, so I could rise up and say "Objection, your honor. Is there a question for the witness, or has opposing counsel moved on to closing arguments?" Someone needs to emphasize Brevity and actual questions at the start of these Q&A's.


I don't mind the statements per se, so much as I do the repetition. One or tow heartfelt "I thought your performance was really terrific" is fine -- the fifth or sixth reiteration can be a bit much.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):