leonid17

Bolshoi in London 2010

60 posts in this topic

Looks like a real good program. I noticed the dates of Spartacus and Coppelia are the same...

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Looks like a real good program. I noticed the dates of Spartacus and Coppelia are the same...

Apologies, I forgot to mention this error.

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Work may take me to London in late July--I won't have much choice about dates if I want to see the ballet (and I do!), but still would be very eager to hear any news about casting as soon as it is available.

I am, of course, aware that casts are, as they say, "subject to change."

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Bolshoi casting has now been posted on the Royal Opera House site - obviously it may change before July. Any spelling mistakes are my own.

Spartacus 19, 20, 21, 31 July at 7.30pm, 31 July at 2pm

Vasiliev/Kaptsova/Zakharova/Volchkov 19, 31E

Nikulina/Dmitrichenko/Alexandrova/Baranov 20

Lobukhin/Kaptsova/Krysanova/Shpilevsky 21

Nikulina/Dmitirichenko/tbc/Baranov 31M

Coppélia 22, 23, 24, July at 7.30pm. 24 July at 2pm

Alexandrova/Skvortsov 22

Osipova/Lopatin 23

Stashkevich/Lopatin 24M

Osipova/Skvortsov 24E

Serenade/Giselle 26, 27, 28 July at 7.30pm

Krysanova/Leonova/Yatsenko/Shpilevsky and Zakharova/Tsiskaridze/Allash 26

Leonova/Yatsenko/Stashkevich/Shpilevsky and Osipova/Volchkov/Allash

27

Krysanova/Leonova/Yatsenko/Shpilevsky and Nikulina/Skvortsov/Leonova 28

Russian Seasons/Petrushka/Paquita 29, 30 July at 7.30pm

Alexandrova/Volchov; Vasiliev/Osipova/Savin; Osipova/Zakharova/Merkuriev 29

Vorontsova/Tsiskaridze; Lopatin/Krysanova/Biktimirov; Osipova/tbc 30

Le Corsaire 2, 3, 4, 5 August at 7.30pm

Alexandrova/Tsiskaridze/Krysanova 2, 5

Osipova/Vasiliev/Kaptsova 3

Shipulina/Skvortsov/Yatsenko 4

Don Quixote 6, 7 August at 7.30pm, 7 August at 2pm, 8 August at 3pm

Zakharova/Lobukhin 6, 8

Krysanova/Merkuriev 7M

Osipova/Vasiliev 7E

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Thank you for posting this--I was actually planning on checking the Royal Opera House website this weekend. Not sure exactly how things will play out this summer, but I am hoping at least to catch Coppelia!

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I can't wait to see Coppelia. But I do have a question. Which ballerina should I see. Maria Alexandrova or Natalie Osipova. I have heard good things of both ballerinas and as I am a student. I can only afford to see one ballet. So which one?

Please help? I will be more than grateful

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It is really up to you, Chazell - both Alexandrova and Osipova were really quite stunning in the role when the reconstruction premiered last year. Lopatin may just be the better Franz, but I suggest you watch one or two clips of both ballerinas on YT and pick the one that appeals the most to you. I particularly enjoyed Alexandrova's musicality and humour in the ballet, not to mention her rock-solid, textbook classical technique (she may just be at her peak right now), but I don't think you can really go wrong here...

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It's so hard to choose which one to see! I don't know what my schedule is like in the summer but if I can only see one- I think I will see Don Q with Natalia and Ivan (it would be a dream to see them live!). Having said that I also want to see Spartacus with Ivan and Tsiskaridze in Giselle. Which one would you guys see?

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It's so hard to choose which one to see! I don't know what my schedule is like in the summer but if I can only see one- I think I will see Don Q with Natalia and Ivan (it would be a dream to see them live!). Having said that I also want to see Spartacus with Ivan and Tsiskaridze in Giselle. Which one would you guys see?

Definitely Osipova and Vasiliev in Don Q if you've never seen them.

I'm going to other Bolshoi perfs. but won't be there for Corsaire and Don Q.

We chose dates so we can also see Mikhailovsky perfs., esp. Laurentia and the new Swan Lake production.

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I saw Vasiliev do the lead in Spartacus last month in Washington, D.C. with the Bolshoi. He was incredible.

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I saw Vasiliev do the lead in Spartacus last month in Washington, D.C. with the Bolshoi. He was incredible.

I just bought tickets for Vasiliev's Spartacus in London and some other perfs. by internet (through Hochauser's email for

priority ticket purchase good today, Mar 31, and tomorrow, April 1 only).

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I saw Vasiliev do the lead in Spartacus last month in Washington, D.C. with the Bolshoi. He was incredible.

I just bought tickets for Vasiliev's Spartacus in London and some other perfs. by internet (through Hochauser's email for

priority ticket purchase good today, Mar 31, and tomorrow, April 1 only).

It's so annoying that you need to be a member to book the tickets...did u get a good seat for Spartacus with Ivan? Do u know whether there are any good seats left (stalls) for the performances, esp Don Q with Natalia and Ivan?

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It's so annoying that you need to be a member to book the tickets...did u get a good seat for Spartacus with Ivan? Do u know whether there are any good seats left (stalls) for the performances, esp Don Q with Natalia and Ivan?

Anna, I checked the seating chart for Osipova/Vasiliev Don Q and there are Stalls seats in all rows (save for row A), both center aisle and sides.

I'm not an ROH member; I got the email from Hochhauser because I had bought tickets on line some years ago when the Bolshoi performed in London, thus I was on his mailing list.

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It's so annoying that you need to be a member to book the tickets...did u get a good seat for Spartacus with Ivan? Do u know whether there are any good seats left (stalls) for the performances, esp Don Q with Natalia and Ivan?

Anna, I checked the seating chart for Osipova/Vasiliev Don Q and there are Stalls seats in all rows (save for row A), both center aisle and sides.

I'm not an ROH member; I got the email from Hochhauser because I had bought tickets on line some years ago when the Bolshoi performed in London, thus I was on his mailing list.

Thanks for that! I just hope there will still be seats left when I book in April! I guess I just have to book as early as I can...

Ahh...I still don't know whether to see Don Q or Spartacus!

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There are a lot of cast changes on the Royal Opera House website regarding the Bolshoi's tour starting next week. Zakharova is out of the tour due to an injury. Gone, too, is Ekaterina Shipulina. Marianna Ryzhkina has been added to the tour. Osipova now dances the opening nights of both Coppelia and Giselle; she and Vasiliev get two performances of Don Quixote yet not their original one.

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I might be able to be in London during Bolshoi London season, though the possibilities are not high.

In this regards, I hope someone kindly let me know which performance to choose considering the casting/the remaining seat.

Giselle

- The best available seat for Osipova is at the P row, Orchestra stalls, where I cannot see well.

- Then, the choice will be between (i) the seat at the B row for Anna Nikulina/Alexander Volchkov, and (ii) the one in the C row, but side section, for Nina Kaptsova/Ruslan Skvortsov. Which one shall I choose?

Further, I want to know when the returned ticket will be released. Spartacus of July 31, both matinee and evening, are nearly sold out. Given their high popularity, I'd better give up seeing it?

Many thanks in advance.

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This will be Nikulina's first leading role in London, so she is an unknown quantity. Kaptsova is a lovely dancer, I'm sure she will be very good as Giselle. Unfortunately the cast changes mean I now get to see Nikulina unless I can get another ticket somehow.

Returns are usually available on the day, though you may have to queue, but I think there should be a good chance of something turning up as most people booked their tickets months ago.

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This will be Nikulina's first leading role in London, so she is an unknown quantity. Kaptsova is a lovely dancer, I'm sure she will be very good as Giselle. Unfortunately the cast changes mean I now get to see Nikulina unless I can get another ticket somehow.

Returns are usually available on the day, though you may have to queue, but I think there should be a good chance of something turning up as most people booked their tickets months ago.

Thank you very much for quick reply. I am also very happy to know still some chances are remaining for Spartacus by Ivan Vasiliev/Nina Kaptsova. Thanks.

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When I wanted to see the English National Opera at the Coliseum, I stood on the returns line about 20 minutes before the show started, and was about the 19th person in line. There were nine couples ahead of me. It was a last-minute decision to try to see the opera, and I would have gone a lot earlier if I had planned in advance. I was really lucky to get in, and I wouldn't have had a chance if I wanted more than one. Singles are usually easier to come by.

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Spartacus - Bolshoi Ballet

Monday, July 19 2010, 7:30 pm, Royal Opera House, London

Music
 Aram Khachaturian

Choreography
 Yuri Grigorovich

Spartacus 
Ivan Vasiliev

Phrygia 
Nina Kaptsova

Aegina 
Maria Allash

Crassus 
Alexander Volchkov

After seeing the opening performance of the Bolshoi London 2010 season,

I'm finding that the Bolshoi is becoming my favorite ballet company.

It believes in its future, respects its past, and nurtures the new.

How many other companies do that?

Spartacus, of course, is a work from its past, from an earlier socio-political environment and context,

but one that is graced with an original, evening-length musical score; a rare commodity.

Moreover, the choreography of Grigorovich, for all its recognized flaws,

has virtues that have not been surpassed in later choreographic work; namely,

placement of male dancing in the forefront of the work, and promotion of a heroic style.

The latter may be considered by some as an aesthetic throwback, something past its historic moment.

When one sees the conviction, vibrancy, and the sheer presence of the Bolshoi dancers in Spartacus,

at least for me, the heroic style lives.

Spartacus relies on a quartet of leading characters to create its potency:

the male hero -Spartacus-and the anti-hero -Crassus,

and the female hearth-keeper -Phrygia and her opposite, the female will-to-power -Aegina.

Tonight's performance had the ideal cast for the quartet.

(Although this being the Bolshoi, there are, very likely, other ideal casts in the waiting).

Ivan Vasiliev, although young, is well known for his virtuosic capabilities.

What made him compelling as Spartacus, is his total absorption

of the heroic style. Every second on stage, whether moving or still,

he remains a man with a mission, a hero whose wife has prophesied his

coming power and final misfortune.

Nina Kaptsova was a convincing and physically gorgeous Phrygia,

a 'weeping spirit', in a lineage that follows Natalia Bessmertnova.

Alexander Volchkov as Crassus, portrayed the anti-hero as alpha male with

prodigious displays of physical control and body language denoting authority

and facial expressions suggesting the arrogance of power.

Maria Allash as Aegina was a total surprise for me.

In previous roles (the one I remember best is as the Lilac Fairy),

she was a model of academic purity and sweetness of disposition; kind of the opposite of the values of Aegina.

Aegina is a woman seeking to gain authority and the riches of the world, as an end that justifies any means.

Allash's Aegina is a tour de force, compelling, driven, and determined.

I thought it was a fantastic performance.

Special mention is due to the trio of shepherds (A Bolotin, D. Medvedev, V. Lopatin) and

the quartet of shepherds (V. Biktimirov, D. Savin, E. Khromushin, A. Vodopetov) and the quintet of shepherdesses

(A. Stashkevich, S. Pavlova, Y. Lunkina, B. Joo Yoon, D. Gurevich) for their brilliant dancing.

Bravos to the ensemble artists who portrayed satyrs and courtesans, slaves and slave traders,

gladiators and roman legions with conviction, verve and total dedication.

The Bolshoi Theatre Orchestra was capably led by Pavel Sorokin.

There was enthusiastic audience applause for two curtain calls.

The quartet also appeared twice in front of the curtain to accept the continuing audience applause.

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Bolshoi Ballet

Coppelia

Ballet in three acts

22 July 7:30 pm Royal Opera House London

Music Leo Delibes

Libretto Charles Nuitter and Arthur Saint-Leon

Choreography Marius Petipa and Enrico Cecchetti

Revival Sergei Vikharev

Set Design Boris Kaminsky

Décor sketches Pyotr Lambin (acts I & III) Heinrich Levot (act II)

Costume Design Tatiana Noginova

Costume sketches Adolph Charlemagne, Pyotr Grigoriev, Evgeny Ponomaryov

Archive Research Pavel Gershenson

Choreography restored using notations from the Harvard Theatre Collection.

Swanhilda Natalia Osipova

Franz Ruslan Skvortsov

Coppelius Gennady Yanin

Eight friends Viktoria Litvinova, Anna Tikhomirova, Anna Okuneva, Svetlana Pavlova, Yanina Parienko, Daria Khokhlova,

Yulia Lunkina, Joo Yoon Bae

Mazurka Anna Antropova, Anna Nakhapetova, Alexander Vodopetov, Igor Tsvirko

Czardas Kristina Karaseva, Vitaly Biktimirov

L'Aurore Ekaterina Krysanova

La Prière Anna Nikulina

Le Travail Anastasia Yatsenko and

Daria Khokhlova, Svetlana Pavlova,

Maria Prorich, Olga Tubalova

La Folie Anna Leonova

Noce Villageoise Anna Nakhapetova, Batyr Annadurdyev

Let me say right away that I found this the best production I have ever seen of Coppélia, lively,

coherent in visual and musical terms, with the story and its incidents clearly told, but foremost, elegant, in all its parts.

The cast was spectacular in the Vikharev revival of the Petipa and Cecchetti choreography,

matching the melodic brilliance of Delibes' score, and the simply beautiful costumes- down to the last one-,

as well as the airy ambience provided by the recreated sets.

If I were rating with stars, I would give the highest number to every aspect of the

production, casting, sets, costumes, orchestra, revival, --and throw in an extra one to Sergei Vikharev for the revival.

The music enchanted me even with the overture, before the curtain came up.

The choreography enchanted with its musical consonance and its simplicity of means;

less always turned out to be more. Just one example :

when Swanhilda's friend danced they did a single pirouette en dehors but that pirouette

finished in a developpé en avant before closing.

Natalia Osipova seems born to play this part.

Even though she has stated she had always wanted "to suffer on stage",

she also has the singular gift of making people smile while she's on stage.

She is a wonderful Swanhilda.

In a manège of hops around the stage, she exhibited the same surreal ballon

she accomplishes with her leaps. Simply spectacular defiance of gravity.

To my mind, this series of hops showed the certain hand of Cecchetti. Or I'd like to think so.

The male contingent of the cast were a match to Osipova's stage work.

Ruslan Skvortsov had wonderful skills in mime and facial expressiveness as well as dancing and partnering excellently.

As a couple, Osipova and Skvortsov, equally showed, through momentary touches of intimacy (including chagrin),

that they had a relationship with each other, with a full range of emotions resulting from it.

Gennady Yanin as Coppélius, builds an eccentric character without the silliness of 'the doddering fool' syndrome,

one that comes across as ageism in other productions of Coppélia.

The character retains his dignity as a human being throughout,

even though he creates comedy and sees the world differently than others.

In the last scene, while the wedding festivities proceed, we see Coppélius

crossing the stage, carrying his inert doll, now disheveled and half-dressed, away from the action.

Part of the enchantments that Coppélia offers are the ensemble dances of the Mazurka and Czardas

in the first act, the Spanish and Scottish dances of Coppélia in the second act, and the wedding dances of the third act,

the grand pas de deux, and the solos of Dawn, Prayer, Work, Folly, and the Country Wedding dance ensemble.

I don't want to get prolix with elaborate descriptions of all these riches.

The grand pas de deux, esp. the quiet and profound adage, was exquisite.

The group dances (Mazurka, Czardas, etc.) were top rate, the solos of the 3rd act a cornucopia of riches.

The Dawn of Ekaterina Krysanova, the Prayer of Anna Nikulina, Work of Anastasia Yatsenko, Folly of Anna Leonova.

Just pick a favorite. You can't go wrong.

The Bolshoi orchestra was conducted by Igor Dronov.

The Royal Opera House audience applauded enthusiastically.

Natalia Osipova brought onto the stage the conductor as well as Sergei Vikharev.

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Thanks to Chiapuris for these reviews. I am at a not very comfortable hotel computer station and won't be writing much unless perhaps after I return to the States. I did want to say at least that I was at both of these performances and agree that they were fabulous--On a few points perhaps I would have some very mild reservations/questions. (And I still prefer Balanchine's and Danilova's Coppelia at least when it comes to Act III.) But these were terrific performances with the company looking in great form.

As Swanilda Osipova is a sheer joy to watch and I particularly appreciated Yannin's Coppelius who indeed, as Chiapuris reported, gave a rather sympathetic and (so to speak) humanely grounded performance. Indeed, all the performances in this meticulously prepared nineteenth-century classic and in the wildly over the top theatrics of Spartacus were, somehow, though in very different styles, characterized by a wonderfully humane quality--that is, one felt powerful and genuine emotion being communicated through all the (almost always excellent and often superlative) dancing whether classical or character....or whatever it is one calls Grigorovich.

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