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"Open Barre" performance No. 1 at MCB studioNov. 13-14


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#1 bart

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Posted 08 November 2009 - 05:13 AM

From the MCB website:

09-10 Open Barre Dance Series

Join us at our intimate 200-seat studio theatre to see three ballet masterworks: In the Night, Black Swan Pas de Deux, and The Four Temperaments -- with a pre-show Open Bar reception in our lobby.

Tickets for the reception/performance are just $33.
Or buy the full 3-program Open Barre Series for just $89 (for the 3-program series, call the Box Office at 305.929.7010)
Plus, if you come Saturday evening, there's an after-party with a free drink at nearby Aero Bar.

November 13-14, 2009
Friday, November 13, 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 14, 2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

Lynn & Louis Wolfson, II Theatre
Miami City Ballet Studios
Ophelia & Juan Js Roca Center
2200 Liberty Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 33139
305.929.7000


I love these shows! Is anyone going? I'll be there for the Saturday matinee, having retired recently from the long nightime drive down to Miami Beach. The highway system in Miami is :) enough in the daytime for those not familiar with it. After dark it's -- :o :excl: :thanks:

Info. for Open Barre No. 2 and No. 3 is as follows:

February 26-27, 2010
Friday, February 26, 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, February 27, 2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.

April 23-24, 2010
Friday, April 23, 6:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 24, 2 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.



#2 bart

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 05:28 AM

According to the MCB website, the program for this weekend's Open Barre consists of:
-- In the Night
-- Black Swan pdd
-- 4 Temperaments

They don't say whether the Robbins and Balanchine are complete or excerpts.

#3 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 13 November 2009 - 11:12 AM

I would love to go...specially to see Delgado's Odile, but I don't get off work 'till 7:00 PM on both days.. :(

#4 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 14 November 2009 - 07:58 PM

...bart...CANT' WAIT FOR YOUR THOUGHTS ON TONIGHT'S OPEN BARRE!! -(specially that Black Swan...)
I couldn't make it...as I predicted, but instead I went to this...

https://www.nws.edu/...s...357&pid=858

so..one more time, I guess I couldn't ask for more...right...? :thumbsup:

#5 bart

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 02:50 PM

Some thoughts -- very much delayed -- on the Saturday matinee performance of Open Barre.

It was a full full performance, with each segment introduced by Edward Villella. A temporary proscenium separates the dancers (on the studio floor) from the audience (in chairs on risers). Lighting, costumes, etc., are as they would be a staged performance. But sitting in the first row, as we were, feels very much like watching a dress rehearsal in a real dance studio. It's difficult to capture the whole picture or the full effect. Instead, the thrill comes from being able to observe innumerable small details.

In the Night.

First couple: Tricia Albertson and Didier Bramaz. Lovely dancing, especially from Bramaz, though without much emotional contact. One of my favorite bits is a pause at which the two dancers stand apart, facing one another. Each performs a simple, deep inhalation of breath. It's a preparation for the more rapturous central portion of the pas de deux. As Bramaz took his breath, his chest rose, his body seemed to grow in height, he looked deeply in Albertson's eyes. It was an invitation for something more. Albertson did not respond, so they carried on more or less as before.

Second couple: Jennifer Kronenberg and Carlos Guerra. This partnership has become, in the past couple of seasons, truly marvelous. I don't know whether Kronenberg has danced this before. (At the performances I saw in March, she did not.) But it's perfect for her.) She has the grandeur, allure, and physical beauty to carry it off. Guerra, who was a tenative partner just a few years ago, has become confident, romantic, and a pleasure to watch all on his own.

Third couple: Jeanette Delgado, as the tumultuous, insecure, "I adore you/ don't touch me" woman was a revelation. I've never seen anyone dance this with as much abandon and intensity, especially in the scenes where her partner (Renato Penteado) lifts her and she beats her arms in the air in protest. She was literally furious. I'm not sure whether this worked or not. Penteado seemed unsure of how to handle her, as many cavaliers probably would. Delgado's over-the-top beginning made the gesture of kneeling at his feet seem somewhat comic in contrast. Conclusion so far: wonderfully danced, but maybe needs a little rethinking?

Black Swan Pas de Deux. Mary Carmen Catoya and Rolando Sarabia. This is definitely a work in progress. Catoya has so much going for her in this part, but I don't see the characterization that several posters on other threads have described. There is a lack of consistency in facial expression. I noticed that she has increased the difficulty of the fouette sequence by including doubles at every-other turn, and by concluding with 450-degree turns. Right, now, this bravura comes at a price: significant travelling around the stage. Sarabia raises the phrase "attentive partner" to new heights. He's an elegant dancer -- much subtler and more classical than I thought when I first saw him. His variation was simply beautiful.

Four Temperaments. Callie Manning and Carlos Quenedit danced the First Theme in a way that was so serene, serious, and flowing that it became almost sacramental. (They appeared again in the finale.)

In Sanguinic, Patricia Delgado was wonderful, capable of big moves and openness when required, and shifting easily to edginess and speed. This version of Balanchine doesn't seem to come naturally to Sarabia. He has a roundedness, even a softness, that seemed to belong in another ballet. But somehow it worked. I enjoyed watching Sarabia in the final movement, where his slightly off-style approach actually made the male ensemble more interesting to me.

Choleric was Jennifer Kronenberg. Her movement is a bit plush for this role, but she has -- amazingly -- the speed and attack. I loved it.

At the end, when the ballerinas a lifted high above their partners heads -- appearing to leap and float in the air like dolphins amind the waves of corps dancers -- I was hooked. 4 T's is currently my favorite ballet (again !!!). Tears came to my eyes, as I confess they rarely do any longer in something like Swan Lake.

#6 bart

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 02:50 PM

Some thoughts -- very much delayed -- on the Saturday matinee performance of Open Barre.

This was a full, all-out performance, with each segment introduced by Edward Villella. A temporary proscenium separates the dancers (on the studio floor) from the audience (in chairs on risers). Lighting, costumes, etc., are as they would be a staged performance. But sitting in the first row, as we were, feels very much like watching a dress rehearsal in a real dance studio. It's difficult to capture the whole picture or the full effect. Instead, the thrill comes from being able to observe innumerable small details.

In the Night.

First couple: Tricia Albertson and Didier Bramaz. Lovely dancing, especially from Bramaz, though without much emotional contact. One of my favorite bits is a pause at which the two dancers stand apart, facing one another. Each performs a simple, deep inhalation of breath. It's a preparation for the more rapturous central portion of the pas de deux. As Bramaz took his breath, his chest rose, his body seemed to grow in height, he looked deeply in Albertson's eyes. It was an invitation for something more. Albertson did not respond to his invitation, so they carried on more or less as before.

Second couple: Jennifer Kronenberg and Carlos Guerra. This partnership has become, in the past couple of seasons, truly marvelous. I don't know whether Kronenberg has danced this before. (At the performances I saw in March, she did not.) But it's perfect for her. She has the grandeur, allure, and physical beauty to carry it off. Guerra, who struck me as a slightly tentative partner just a few years ago, has become confident, romantic, and a pleasure to watch all on his own.

Third couple: Jeanette Delgado, as the tumultuous, insecure, "I adore you/ don't touch me" woman was a revelation. I've never seen anyone dance this with as much abandon and intensity, especially in the scenes where her partner (Renato Penteado) lifts her and she beats her arms in the air in protest. She was a whirlwind -- literally furious. I'm not sure whether this worked or not. Penteado's character seemed unsure of how to handle her, as many cavaliers probably would. Delgado's over-the-top opening made the gesture of kneeling at his feet seem somewhat comic in contrast. Conclusion: wonderfully danced, but maybe needs a little rethinking?

Black Swan Pas de Deux. Mary Carmen Catoya and Rolando Sarabia. This is definitely a work in progress. Catoya has so much going for her in this part, but I don't see the characterization that several posters on other threads have described. There is, for example, a lack of consistency in facial expression. (When it's working, it's perfect.) I also noticed that she has increased the difficulty of the fouette sequence by including doubles at every-other turn, and by concluding with 450-degree turns. Right, now, this bravura comes at a price: significant travelling around the stage. Sarabia raises the phrase "attentive partner" to new heights. He's an elegant dancer -- much subtler and more classical than I thought when I first saw him. His variation was simply beautiful.

Four Temperaments. Callie Manning and Carlos Quenedit danced the First Theme with a serenity, seriousness, and flow that it made it appear almost sacramental.

In Sanguinic, Patricia Delgado was wonderful, capable of big moves and openness when required, and shifting easily to risk-taking and speed. This kind of Balanchine doesn't seem to come naturally to Sarabia. He has a roundedness, even a softness, that seemed to belong in another ballet. But somehow it worked, possibly because he is now investing himself so thoroughly in every movement. I enjoyed watching Sarabia in the final movement, where his slightly off-style approach actually made the male ensemble more interesting to me.

Choleric was Jennifer Kronenberg. Her movement is a bit plush for this role, but she has -- amazingly -- the speed and attack. I loved it.

At the end, when the ballerinas are lifted high above their partners' heads -- appearing to float in the air like dolphins leaping amidst the waves of corps dancers -- I was hooked (again!). 4 T's is currently my favorite ballet (again !). Tears came to my eyes (again!), as I confess they rarely do any longer in something like Swan Lake.

#7 mira

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 04:34 PM

Bart,
I was there and agree completely with your sensitive review. Would only add that I love MCB's Open Barre performances - what a rare treat.

:-)



Some thoughts -- very much delayed -- on the Saturday matinee performance of Open Barre.

It was a full full performance, with each segment introduced by Edward Villella. A temporary proscenium separates the dancers (on the studio floor) from the audience (in chairs on risers). Lighting, costumes, etc., are as they would be a staged performance. But sitting in the first row, as we were, feels very much like watching a dress rehearsal in a real dance studio. It's difficult to capture the whole picture or the full effect. Instead, the thrill comes from being able to observe innumerable small details.

In the Night.

First couple: Tricia Albertson and Didier Bramaz. Lovely dancing, especially from Bramaz, though without much emotional contact. One of my favorite bits is a pause at which the two dancers stand apart, facing one another. Each performs a simple, deep inhalation of breath. It's a preparation for the more rapturous central portion of the pas de deux. As Bramaz took his breath, his chest rose, his body seemed to grow in height, he looked deeply in Albertson's eyes. It was an invitation for something more. Albertson did not respond, so they carried on more or less as before.

Second couple: Jennifer Kronenberg and Carlos Guerra. This partnership has become, in the past couple of seasons, truly marvelous. I don't know whether Kronenberg has danced this before. (At the performances I saw in March, she did not.) But it's perfect for her.) She has the grandeur, allure, and physical beauty to carry it off. Guerra, who was a tenative partner just a few years ago, has become confident, romantic, and a pleasure to watch all on his own.

Third couple: Jeanette Delgado, as the tumultuous, insecure, "I adore you/ don't touch me" woman was a revelation. I've never seen anyone dance this with as much abandon and intensity, especially in the scenes where her partner (Renato Penteado) lifts her and she beats her arms in the air in protest. She was literally furious. I'm not sure whether this worked or not. Penteado seemed unsure of how to handle her, as many cavaliers probably would. Delgado's over-the-top beginning made the gesture of kneeling at his feet seem somewhat comic in contrast. Conclusion so far: wonderfully danced, but maybe needs a little rethinking?

Black Swan Pas de Deux. Mary Carmen Catoya and Rolando Sarabia. This is definitely a work in progress. Catoya has so much going for her in this part, but I don't see the characterization that several posters on other threads have described. There is a lack of consistency in facial expression. I noticed that she has increased the difficulty of the fouette sequence by including doubles at every-other turn, and by concluding with 450-degree turns. Right, now, this bravura comes at a price: significant travelling around the stage. Sarabia raises the phrase "attentive partner" to new heights. He's an elegant dancer -- much subtler and more classical than I thought when I first saw him. His variation was simply beautiful.

Four Temperaments. Callie Manning and Carlos Quenedit danced the First Theme in a way that was so serene, serious, and flowing that it became almost sacramental. (They appeared again in the finale.)

In Sanguinic, Patricia Delgado was wonderful, capable of big moves and openness when required, and shifting easily to edginess and speed. This version of Balanchine doesn't seem to come naturally to Sarabia. He has a roundedness, even a softness, that seemed to belong in another ballet. But somehow it worked. I enjoyed watching Sarabia in the final movement, where his slightly off-style approach actually made the male ensemble more interesting to me.

Choleric was Jennifer Kronenberg. Her movement is a bit plush for this role, but she has -- amazingly -- the speed and attack. I loved it.

At the end, when the ballerinas a lifted high above their partners heads -- appearing to leap and float in the air like dolphins amidst the waves of corps dancers -- I was hooked. 4 T's is currently my favorite ballet (again !!!). Tears came to my eyes, as I confess they rarely do any longer in something like Swan Lake.



#8 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 08:19 PM

bart...that was a great review... ! (I can DEFINITELY picture Jeanette being "over-the-top"... :thumbsup: )

#9 Jack Reed

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Posted 19 November 2009 - 09:06 PM

Yeah, bart, thanks, I guess... I hadn't realized what the Open Barre series was at all. I thought it was an exhibition of student choreography or something! Pay attention, Jack! (Where's the emoticon for banging your head on the wall?)

Anyway, I'm puzzled by Catoya's rendition of "Black Swan" in your report. In Chicago, her facial expression developed as she first led Siegfried on and then gloated a bit as he fell for it, things like that. She was such a knowing, evil Odile, though in an understated way, I felt for the poor, innocent guy, more and more hopelessly entranced.

It looks like I missed something, all right. Except it's not all right... But now I know better, so, yeah, thanks, bart.

#10 bart

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 12:22 PM

Jack, regarding Catoya: could the problem be one of inconsistency due to relative lack of experience? After all, as an MCB ballerina, she gets to dance this type of part infrequently. Some of its demands are neither practiced nor encouraged at MCB, at least not often.

Re: Open Barre. When we first started attending several years ago, the performances were indeed a mixed bag -- delightful always, but not always performance-ready. They weren't student performances, but company members had the chance to work on their own choreography as well as parts of ballets that were coming up in the rep.

Based on what Villella said in his opening remarks, I suspect that the switch to full, performance-read programs is a "Thank You" gift to the generous Miami Beach audience, now that MCB has moved across the Bay to the Arsht Center in downtown Miami.

#11 Jack Reed

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Posted 20 November 2009 - 01:40 PM

bart, I think the problem may be with me not understanding what you mean by "inconsistency" -- I thought Catoya's two performances in Chicago were consistent as regards characterisation, and her facial expression changed moment-by-moment as the little plot developed. She stayed right in character, the character of an evil, magical creature taking control of poor, naive Siegfried -- not that she laid it on thick or made it melodramatic, but it was there, consistently. Now, technically, she may have been just slightly inconsistent, with hints at a couple of instants of the real difficulties in this pas de deux, versus her customary incredible easy mastery of everything. But maybe she felt the Open Barre setting was -- less serious? Less important? Or maybe you were so close you could see things we couldn't in row P of the Auditorium Theatre, which is an opera house with a pit, after all.

And thanks for the rest of that. I guess I wasn't completely off, but I do need to pay closer attention to what the Open Barre rep is, for instance.


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