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Autumn reading


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20 replies to this topic

#16 PeggyR

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Posted 24 November 2009 - 04:02 PM

...it is always nice to find another fan.

Have you visited the mild insanity of Fforde's website? Don't miss The Wonderful World of Toast.

Toast Art Unveiled!
The winner of the 1985 'Toast Art' competition goes to this excellent rendition of the Mona Lisa, in toast.



#17 Ed Waffle

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 08:27 PM

...it is always nice to find another fan.

Have you visited the mild insanity of Fforde's website? Don't miss The Wonderful World of Toast.

Toast Art Unveiled!
The winner of the 1985 'Toast Art' competition goes to this excellent rendition of the Mona Lisa, in toast.


Thanks for mentioning his website--I hadn't visited it quite a while. The Toast Marketing Board is a very hard working bunch. And don't miss the SpecOps site. "SpecOps--Your guardians now, then, forever."

#18 dirac

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 10:52 AM

...it is always nice to find another fan.

Have you visited the mild insanity of Fforde's website? Don't miss The Wonderful World of Toast.

Toast Art Unveiled!
The winner of the 1985 'Toast Art' competition goes to this excellent rendition of the Mona Lisa, in toast.


Great link, PeggyR.

#19 Rosa

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 06:06 PM

I recently read Phantastes, a fantasy novel, by George MacDonald, and Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities. I thought A Tale of Two Cities was quite amazing, different from Dickens' other works I've read. Sydney Carton is not the typical hero you find in literature, yet I came to like him the most of all the characters. The ending almost made me cry.

Now I am reading Book Lust by Nancy Pearl, which is over one hundred lists of recommended reading. I am thoroughly enjoying it and already have quite a number of titles I will have to try to track down someday. :thumbsup:

#20 Giannina

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 08:47 AM

My Autumn reading was also my late Summer reading and early Winter reading. It's "Carlo Crivelli" by Ronald Lightbrown. I love Crivelli's paintings, and a clerk at London's National Gallery said I should hunt down this book. I was so excited when I found a new copy that I could afford. It's coffee-table size with gorgeous reproductions. However, it's 502 pages of itsy bitsy print, and though many of the pages have reproductions, that hardly diminishes from the amount of reading material. The book is jam-packed with information: history, biography, symbolism of each and every item in each painting. It's a treasure trove of information but I wonder how many people, if anyone, have read the entire book. I'm not half way through it and I'm giving up. Just looking at the reproductions tells me how much I'm going to miss but I can't read another word. None the less it's one of the most beautiful books I've ever seen.

Giannina

#21 Ed Waffle

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Posted 22 December 2009 - 09:44 AM

My Autumn reading was also my late Summer reading and early Winter reading. It's "Carlo Crivelli" by Ronald Lightbrown. I love Crivelli's paintings, and a clerk at London's National Gallery said I should hunt down this book. I was so excited when I found a new copy that I could afford. It's coffee-table size with gorgeous reproductions. However, it's 502 pages of itsy bitsy print, and though many of the pages have reproductions, that hardly diminishes from the amount of reading material. The book is jam-packed with information: history, biography, symbolism of each and every item in each painting. It's a treasure trove of information but I wonder how many people, if anyone, have read the entire book. I'm not half way through it and I'm giving up. Just looking at the reproductions tells me how much I'm going to miss but I can't read another word. None the less it's one of the most beautiful books I've ever seen.

Giannina


Wow--an amazing book. Going to the Yale University Press website on can preview quite a few pages from this book. Yale/Crivelli

Extremely detailed discussions of the paintings and since you have seen many of the original works perhaps even more meaningful. Looks like the work of a lifetime for Ronald Lightbrown.


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