cubanmiamiboy

Youtube keeps the bonfire...

63 posts in this topic

Well in this, at the library, you will find a snippet, not mentioned how long it is. Thanks to Ann Barzel once again. (emphasis added).

http://catalog.nypl.org/iii/encore/record/...amp;suite=pearl

Description 1 videodisc (NTSC) (59 min.) : si., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.

Performed by Nora Kaye and members of the New York City Ballet (Age of anxiety, Pas de trois [1951]) and American Ballet Theatre (all other ballets).

Note Pas de quatre filmed in 1941. Age of anxiety filmed in 1955. Pas de trois filmed in 1955. The excerpts from the Rose adagio in Princess Aurora filmed in 1942. Excerpts from Jardin aux lilas filmed in the 1950s. Excerpts from A streetcar named desire filmed in the 1950s. Excerpts from Pillar of fire filmed in 1943. Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet filmed in 1944. Excerpts from Waltz academy filmed in the 1940s. Filming date for excerpts from Gift of the Magi unknown [1945 or later]. Excerpts from Apollo filmed in 1946. Excerpts from On stage! filmed in the late 1940's. Filming date for excerpts from Caprichos unknown [1950 or later].

Event Compilation of ballet excerpts filmed in performance on various dates (1941 to 195-?).

Contents Pas de quatre : [excerpts] / choreography, Anton Dolin ; costumes, after the lithograph by A.E. Chalon ; danced by Kaye (Grisi), Alicia Markova (Taglioni), Karen Conrad (Grahn), and Annabelle Lyon (Cerrito) -- Age of anxiety : [excerpts] / choreography, Jerome Robbins ; scenery and costumes, Oliver Smith ; danced by Nora Kaye, Tanaquil Le Clercq, Roy Tobias, Francisco Moncion, and others -- Pas de trois [1951] [also called Minkus pas de trois] : [excerpts] / choreography, George Balanchine ; costumes, Barbara Karinska ; danced by Nora Kaye, Maria Tallchief, and André Eglevsky -- Princess Aurora: Rose adagio : [excerpts] / choreography, Anton Dolin after Marius Petipa ; scenery, Michel Baronov after Léon Bakst ; costumes, Karinska after Bakst ; danced by Nora Kaye and four male dancers -- Jardin aux lilas : [excerpts] / choreography, Antony Tudor ; scenery and costumes, Raymond Sovey after Hugh Stevenson ; danced by Nora Kaye (Caroline), Hugh Laing (her lover), Job Sanders (the man she must marry), Sonia Arova (an episode in his past), and others -- A streetcar named desire : [excerpts] / choreography, Valerie Bettis ; scenery, Peter Larkin ; costumes, Saul Bolasni ; danced by Nora Kaye (Blanche), Christine Mayer (Stella), John Kriza (Stanley), Scott Douglas (Mitch), and others -- Pillar of fire : [excerpts] / choreography, Antony Tudor ; scenery and costumes, Jo Mielziner ; danced by Nora Kaye (Hagar), Hugh Laing (young man from the house opposite), Antony Tudor (friend), Lucia Chase (eldest sister), Sono Osato, and others -- Romeo and Juliet : [excerpts] / choreography, Antony Tudor ; scenery and costumes, Eugene Berman ; danced by Nora Kaye (Juliet), Hugh Laing (Romeo), Antony Tudor (Tybalt), Jerome Robbins (Mercutio), Peter Gladke, Diana Adams (Rosaline?), and others ; more than one cast appears in the supporting roles -- Waltz academy : [excerpts] / choreography, George Balanchine ; scenery, Oliver Smith ; costumes, Alvin Colt ; danced by Nora Kaye, Nana Gollner, Paul Petroff, and others -- Pillar of fire : [excerpts] / choreography, Antony Tudor ; scenery and costumes, Jo Mielziner ; danced by Nora Kaye (Hagar), Hugh Laing (young man from the house opposite), Antony Tudor (friend), Lucia Chase (eldest sister), Sono Osato, and others -- Gift of the Magi : [excerpts] / choreography, Simon Semenoff ; scenery and costumes, Raoul Pène du Bois ; danced by Nora Kaye (Della), John Kriza (Jim), and others -- Apollo : [excerpts] / choreography, George Balanchine ; scenery, Eugene B. Dunkel ; costumes, Karinska ; danced by Igor Youskevitch (Apollo ; first solo and pas d'action), André Eglevsky (Apollo ; repetition of pas d'action and remainder of ballet), Alicia Alonso (Terpsichore), Nora Kaye (Polyhymnia), and Barbara Fallis (Calliope).

On stage! : [excerpts] / choreography, Michael Kidd ; scenery, Oliver Smith ; costumes, Alvin Colt ; danced by Nora Kaye (ballerina), John Kriza (her partner), Janet Reed (girl in pink), Michael Kidd (handyman) ; Ruth Ann Koesun also appears as the girl in pink -- Candid footage of Nora Kaye, Janet Reed, and Nana Gollner making up in the dressing room -- Caprichos : [excerpts] / filming date unknown [1950 or later] ; choreography, Herbert Ross ; costumes, Helene Pons ; danced by Paula Lloyd, Alicia Alonso, Ruth Ann Koesun, John Kriza, Eric Braun, and Kelly Brown.

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A similar parallel can be found i think in the performance of Wagner's works after Richard Wagner's death. For years his widow Cosima exercised iron control of the "Master's" works and was infuriated by any little change in staging. She also tried to prevent his works (particularly Parsifal) from being performed outside of Bayreuth. Wagner himself was a considerably more practical man when it came to his own works. Eventually the Wagner family's iron grip loosened (it had to), although the family still runs the Bayreuth Festival. I suspect the same thing will happen to the Balanchine Trust over time. Whether it's in our lifetime is another matter.

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I sincerely hope they will .Also why is it the "powers that be" are able to get sites closed down, on YouTube featuring works credited to other Choreographers as well as Balanchine.

When reading the Mission Statements of the Trust and Foundation, their requirements to grant permission for officially performing licensed Balanchine's Ballets, are very stringent. And although they are stated as being "Non profit making, there must be considerable income generated from the programmes and services they insist on providing. It would seem that both organisations are well and truly tied up with Red Tape.Which leaves them little scope for flexibility., or to at least be able to reduce their control.

Full details of both organisations are available on the Internet.

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It could be a matter of two things, one being the BT protesting and having their ballets removed, and the second being Youtube deciding to punish/take action against the offense as a violation of terms of service?

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I did wonder if the later could be the case. sometimes you see a notice when a clip cannot be played, as it is removed. Is it YouTube trying to avoid action by the copyright owner? Yet they encourage people to use their site, by up-loading things. But I get the feeling it is at their own risk, so YouTube do not get prosicuted. Or am I mis guided about this?

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Yes, YouTube wants users to post videos of their original videos -- funny pet things, baby's first steps, song parodies, yada, yada. They do not want people posting videos taken from professionally produced videos that are sold on the open market or were recorded without presenter's permission during a live, professional performance. [alliteration unintended :wink: ]

Of course, it's not some stranger's baby's first steps that keeps us, ballet lovers, coming back to the site. It's exactly those items of dubious (or worse) legality.

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Talk about serendipity, synchonicity, or whatever allignment of facts resulted in this topic at this time...

This past week I learned footage I had shot (and edited) of a performance of Corella Ballet was posted on YouTube without my knowledge or permission. This is an infringement not only of my copyright in the footage, but I am also concerned because, though the music (P.Glass) may have been cleared for the performance--and actually I'm not sure about that (the choreographer was a little vague), I definately haven't cleared it yet for exhibition in the film. So this YT posting not only infringes my copyright, but possibly the music as well.

The choreographer originally requested the video to promote his choreography, and (trying to be nice) I originally agreed to its "internal use"--ie. direct to theatres/dance companies who might be interested, but NOT worldwide public exhibition on the internet/YouTube! Especially, since it was a MAJOR investment on my part to make the film, and if it's posted like this, with no credit or permission, it doesn't look like I will recoup those costs. Meanwhile, the choreographer and company get a free video of their production and free promotion while I get nothing for filming it or allowing it to be used.

When I posted the trailer to my film (for which I DID clear all rights for choreography and music, AND provided detailed credits), I did so with the restriction that the trailer be "read only"--ie. anyone could view it, but not download or copy it, which is also why I did not post it on YouTube. Until I knew my rights as the filmmaker were secured,AND the component parts of that film--choreography/music/visuals--were secured, then I would not risk the liability of just posting it on the internet or having a million downloads negate the eventual release of the completed film. It would also set a bad precedent for me, if I wanted to clear rights for future works or exhibition/performances. Then there is also the question of compensation; several filmmaker forums have complained that YT is not equitable: 1M views netting only $1K or less to the copyright owner. I've also discussed this issue of who owns what rights to internet postings with several lawyers, and broadcast producers, and even Mr. Kirshner at one point.

So, though I am saddened when works are pulled from YT--since I, too, have discovered many performers/performances there and tried to buy tapes/dvds based on those discoveries--I am also quite aware of the other side of the story and understand some of the reasoning behind it.

THANKS to all who posted this, and the links to the ArtsJournal and DHC articles.--I've passed them on to my lawyers.

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You summed up "the other side" clearly and objectively, 4mrdncr. :( Thank you.

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Here's a brief article on the new and quite restrictive "internet piracy" law in France.

Illegal downloaders will be sent a warning e-mail, then a letter if they continue, and finally must appear before a judge if they offend again.

The judge can impose a fine, or suspend their access to the internet.

The Creation and Internet Bill set up a new state agency - the Higher Authority for the Distribution of Works and the Protection of Copyright on the Internet (Hadopi).

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8436745.stm

By the way, there are interesting Ballet Talk discussions about this topic going back to 2001. If you use the Search engine ("copyright"),just change the default from "most recent" to "most relevant."

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:unsure: Thank you Bart for the indormation on France's new law. What is needed in an official site where information is available that has been cleared by the Copyright owner for use by it's members.

This may be very difficult to achieve, or even impossible!!! For Ballet lovers such as the members, who may want to look up small sections or related interviews, etc. etc.etc. Would it be feasible to pay a subscription, or is this idea not acceptable. I realise it would take a lot of research and work

o achieve the end result. But at least no rules would be btoken. I am not sure how it would actually function, perhaps similar to some of the music sites, where you have to pay to download. No doubt the Copyright owner would want a fee for the use of their "product".

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The NY Times on June 23 reported that U.S. district court had sided with Google (owner of YouTube) in a suit filed by Viacom (Paramount Pictures and the MTV, Nikelodeon, Comedy Central cable networks.).

In a major victory for Google in its battle with media companies, a federal judge in New York on Wednesday threw out Viacom’s $1 billion copyright infringement lawsuit against Google’s YouTube, the No. 1 Internet video-sharing site.

[ ... ]

The judge granted Google’s motion for summary judgment, saying the company was shielded from Viacom’s copyright claims by “safe harbor” provisions of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

Those provisions generally protect a Web site from liability for copyrighted material uploaded by its users as long as the operator of the site takes down the material when notified by its rightful owner that it was uploaded without permission.

Viacom, which sued Google in 2007 and accused it of copyright infringement after tens of thousands of Viacom videos were uploaded to the site, had argued that Google was not entitled to those protections because it had deliberately turned a blind eye and profited from rampant piracy on YouTube. But Judge Louis L. Stanton of United States District Court for the Southern District of New York sided with Google, saying that while the company certainly knew that copyrighted material had been uploaded to its site, it did not know which clips had been uploaded with permission and which had not.

http://www.nytimes.c...RaQxcpEdVFJ19vQ

Today, Viacom filed an appeal against this decision.

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:crying: Summer 2010, and yet again lots of Clips have been removed from YouTube, I found it beyond belief as they are all marked removed because of copyright infringement. Many of Aurelie Dupont, including the new Documentary by Cedric Klapish, apparently this by a complaint from the distributor. (MK?)There are quite a lot involved in this. I cannot understand why these companies or people do not get it.... they actually help promote the DVD's. Which means that no doubt far more people are likely to see what is going to be available than the original sources of trailers and general advertising.

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In the article Bart mentioned it sounds as if the removal can now be partially automated with a content ID system...

"Since its filing, though, those tensions have eased substantially, as YouTube has set up an automated system to detect and block infringing videos and has signed revenue-sharing agreements with more than a thousand media companies."

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