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Seeing the Ultimate Interpretation and Never Going Back


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#16 dirac

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Posted 08 October 2009 - 02:18 PM

Good points, Ballet fan, and thank you for posting.

#17 Shirabyoshi

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Posted 25 July 2012 - 12:29 AM

I'm sympathetic to all the various feelings expressed in this thread; but I'd like just to add the one thought which keeps me from encasing my best theatrical memories in lucite and leaving them on a shelf to gather dust.

How can we, any of us, no matter the breadth of our experience or the depth of our expertise, really know we've seen the ultimate performance of a particular role or work?

Surely there is always the hope that we may yet be astonished by someone who wasn't even born when so-and-so was simply to-die-for thirty years ago; or that even someone we've seen before may deepen her interpretation over time, may discover within herself a precious hint of the numinous.

Why else would we keep on watching anything at all? And if art isn't about hope, what is it about?

#18 fadedhour

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 11:28 AM

I'm going to sheepishly raise my hand here and realize that while it may sound crazy, I've done this myself.  But it's with a film, so it's slightly different as I can revisit it as often as I'd like.  It was (this is pretty embarrassing to admit) the 1970 film of Wuthering Heights.  The film had its flaws, but I loved Timothy Dalton's performance and decided that that was that, I wouldn't watch any other of the many versions of Wuthering Heights.  I've kept this up for quite a few years now, and actually only last week changed my mind and decided that I have to watch the Laurence Olivier version.  I haven't seen it yet, but I don't think I'll be disappointed (at least, I hope not, after all that!).
 
I actually have a vague memory of watching a film with a perfect performance by one actor, and deciding that he was so wonderful that I actually couldn't watch any other films he'd made for fear of ruining the image of him as that one character.  I can't remember who this was, though presumably not anyone too too famous or it would have been difficult.
 
But I definitely don't hold this as a general principle - that if something's so good, I won't see any other versions of it - and I can't really say why these two performances provoked this sort of reaction.
 
In fact, for ballet, if I like a piece, I like to see many different casts in it, to see their interpretations and maybe learn new things/explore different ideas about the ballet through them.  This year, I saw my favorite ballet with a new cast that featured a couple dancers that I didn't think would do well in the roles they were cast in.  And they were excellent and I'm so glad I got to see them.


#19 sandik

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 11:37 AM

 

This year, I saw my favorite ballet with a new cast that featured a couple dancers that I didn't think would do well in the roles they were cast in.  And they were excellent and I'm so glad I got to see them.

 

 

And that is the best reward!



#20 fadedhour

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 11:42 AM

It is!

 

This reminds me, actually, of when I went to see one of my favorite plays live - I'd read it many times, but never seen it before.  One of the main actors was just OK, but the other two were so good they taught me things about the play I hadn't seen before in just reading it.  I loved that.




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