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"Les Millions d'Arlequin" (Petipa/Drigo)1978 BBC TV broadcasting.


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#16 Hans

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Posted 05 August 2009 - 05:44 PM

Bart, I would just call it skipping. If one really wanted to, one could probably call it some sort of temps levé in retiré position alternating legs, but really..."skipping" is easier. :)

#17 bart

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 03:13 AM

Thanks, Hans. Sometimes the simplest answers ARE the best. :)

#18 Mel Johnson

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 08:20 AM

I remember the original Balanchine "Harlequinade" well, and was rather disappointed when I caught a revival ca. 1980, when a lot of featherbedding (to my eye and sensibility) had been added. Mischa Arshansky played the father as a sort of
Dr. Bartolo-type, but after B's Don Quixote went belly-up, the AK (Ancient Knight) started showing up in all sorts of other ballets, and this was one of them.

The sets were borrowed from the NYC Opera's production of La Cenerentola, and have had a life quite exceeding most opera scenery.

That early production was notable for having Gelsey Kirkland, Nanette Glushak, Colleen Neary, Meg Gordon and others -- as Little Harlequins.

#19 bart

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 08:45 AM

I remember the original Balanchine "Harlequinade" well, and was rather disappointed when I caught a revival ca. 1980, when a lot of featherbedding (to my eye and sensibility) had been added. Mischa Arshansky played the father as a sort of
Dr. Bartolo-type, but after B's Don Quixote went belly-up, the AK (Ancient Knight) started showing up in all sorts of other ballets, and this was one of them.

That's an interesting point. I agree about the structural defects in Balanchine's Harlequinade and Don Q. Despite wonderful parts, each seem padded, somehow unfinished. Each has a little too much stitching together of interesting but not always connected ideas.

Why, I wonder, was he able to do so much better with Coppelia -- and with Midsummer Night's Dream, for that matter? Was it that he was less involved emotionally with those stories?

#20 Mel Johnson

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Posted 06 August 2009 - 01:18 PM

In Coppélia, at least, Balanchine had a structure from his youth which was not heavily modified by interpolations or excerpting. In his later career, he had a steady model in the Ballet Russe production, and of course, when he staged it for NYCB, he had Danilova RIGHT THERE to make sure he didn't get away with a lot of mischief!


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