lovesvetlana

Russian fouettes?

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I noticed on youtube that quite a lot of Americans say that they don't like the "Russian Way of Fouettes", and they particularly like to criticize Svetlana Zakharova's and Alina Somova's fouettes for being "not pretty", or "wrong".

I personally really like the "looks" of Svetlana's fouettes, so I wonder how is it different from the "usual" way of fouettes from USA, and why they don't like the looks of it.

Is it the way they kick the leg out that matters?

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I have not looked at the youtube selections but I do know the difference between "Russian" fouettes and what may be common in the USA.

Russian fouettes, when done correctly open to the side in demi plie then rise, closing the working leg to the back of the working knee and then to the front. The more common form used in the US is to open the working leg to the front in demi plie, demi rond de jambe to side in demi plie and then releve passing the working foot to the back of the knee to the front. There is also another accepted way of doing fouette, but it might be best to take a look around the sister website Ballet Talk for Dancers for the more techical questions. Upper right corner of this page will lead to BT4D! :(

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I have not looked at the youtube selections but I do know the difference between "Russian" fouettes and what may be common in the USA.

Russian fouettes, when done correctly open to the side in demi plie then rise, closing the working leg to the back of the working knee and then to the front. The more common form used in the US is to open the working leg to the front in demi plie, demi rond de jambe to side in demi plie and then releve passing the working foot to the back of the knee to the front. There is also another accepted way of doing fouette, but it might be best to take a look around the sister website Ballet Talk for Dancers for the more techical questions. Upper right corner of this page will lead to BT4D! :(

Yes agreed. Basically in Russian fouettes the working leg goes directly side and then to the knee, and the more common form has what can be described as a stirring motion with the working leg. I prefer the non-Russian way, I find that it generally lends itself to a smoother less jerky motion, but either can be beautiful if done well.

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Thank you everyone, I wonder where I can get a video on the non-Russian fouettes?

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