sandik

2009-10 season

25 posts in this topic

The company hasn't sent out an "official" press release, but you can piece together the details from the promotional materials at the theater during this last program. The dates for the individual reps are on their website -- here's what I know about the actual programming:

rep 1

Romeo et Juliette (Maillot)

rep 2

Petit Mort (Kylian) **

New Caniparoli

West Side Story Suite (Robbins)

Mopey (Goecke)

rep 3

Sleeping Beauty

rep 4

Suspension of Disbelief (Quijada)

Vespers (Dove)

Red Angels (Dove)

Serious Pleasures (Dove) **

rep 5

Serenade (Balanchine)

Four Temperaments (Balanchine)

Square Dance (Balanchine)

rep 6

Coppelia (Balanchine/Danilova) **

** new production

(there may be another Balanchine in there somewhere)

There are some interesting choices here. No Morris, and no Tharp, but a Kylian (first one for PNB) Three program-length ballets, which certainly cuts down on the number of different works they can do. Romeo was very, very popular when it premiered, and I'm sure the company hopes that they can build on that momentum. A new production of Coppelia, so I'm pretty sure we won't see the Stowell choreography again.

(edited about 20 minutes after it was first posted, to correct a couple errors)

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I'm fairly sure in one of the renewal mini-brochures or letters PNB advertised the Balanchine "Coppelia". It's such a wonderful production. From the "Balanchine Catalogue":

Note: Balanchine and Danilova collaborated to reproduce parts of Petipa's choreography for Coppélia, which they had learned while students at the Imperial Ballet School; Danilova had later become a leading interpreter of the role of Swanilda. Balanchine created entirely new choreography for Act III, and for the mazurka and czardas in Act I, and made slight revisions in other dances in Act I. Using music from Sylvia, Balanchine created a male variation for Act I and a complete pas de deux for Act III, in which the male variation is taken from his Sylvia: Pas de Deux [273].

http://balanchine.org/balanchine/display_r...rchMethod=exact

In her book "Dancing for Balanchine", Merrill Ashley describes how Balanchine created the "Dawn" variation for her.

Starting with "Romeo et Juliette" is an interesting way to kick-start the season. I always think of R&J as a winter ballet, and if we're lucky when it is performed we will be in Indian Summer.

I'm assuming "Sleeping Beauty" is the Hynd production.

Is "New Caniparoli" a new work made for the company, or a revival?

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I've only seen the Balanchine/Danilova Coppelia once, on television, but I remember it as very sweet, and of course, intensely musical. And since the score is so very, very lovely, that makes it even better.

When I first heard the idea floated, the company was hoping to get Iole Allessandrini to design (did the sets for Carmen, did that big installation outside the theater with the mesh and the lights) but I don't know if they're still planning for that.

I think, near as I can tell, that "New Caniparoli" means new altogether, not just new to the company.

I agree about R&J -- I always think of it in the winter, when I need something rich and sweet. It will be different to see it in the autumn, though I think the last time the company did the Stowell version it was early in the season. I'll have to go back and look at my notes...

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Moira Macdonald's season announcement article was in today's Seattle Times:

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/thea...rt02ballet.html

The new Val Caniparoli piece is a world premiere named "The Seasons". The "Sleeping Beauty" is a revival of the Hynd, and "Coppelia" is Balanchine's version.

sandik, you hit the nail on the head!

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I need some advice from veteran PNB watchers. I'm planning a weekend trip to Seattle for the 2010 PNB season (have to start planning now since it will take me a full year to work up the nerve to get into an airplane :dunno: ).

These are the programs I'm interested in: 3 - Sleeping Beauty, 5 - All Balanchine, or 6 - Coppelia. Based on comments above, Coppelia is the front runner, but I'm open to suggestions. Thanks.

Peggy

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With "Coppelia" you get a full-length and Balanchine in the same show!

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I personally think you need to reconsider and come for the Romeo & Juliette. It was honestly the best version of Romeo and Juliet I've ever seen in any form. So moving!

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Our recommendations are all over the place -- if it were me, I'd come to see the Balanchine triple bill, since I'd get a broader view of more of the company, with three different groups. Plus it's 4Ts -- my all-time favorite ballet.

But really, it depends on you. Do you love big story things best, do you want to see a big variety of performers, do you want something you already know so you can make some comparisons, or do you want something you don't get to see at home...

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I'd echo sandik's sentiments (it's too personal a choice). Like her, I'd pick the all Balanchine program (because that's what I like best). OTOH, Coppélia might be a great choice because as helene says you get a "two-for" and it is a brand new production with all the excitment (and risk) that brings.

Perhaps a better question would be: "Is there any reason one of these programs would not give me insight into PNB?" My answer to that is: NO.

IMO, PNB is excellent in all modes: romantic, classical, neo-classical, and modern. Perhaps the Balachine program would best serve to display this vesatility to you since it contains the range of the 4T's (perhaps my favorite ballet also, excepting maybe Agon) and Serenade.

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If the casting carries over from the last run, PNB has multiple excellent casts in "Square Dance", which I could watch three times in a row.

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rep 1

Romeo et Juliette (Maillot)

I'm so glad to see this return--and even more so because I'm itching to see the extraordinary performance I anticipate from Carla Körbes. Now, if there was also an opportunity to see Rachel Foster take on the role, I don't know how I would be able to contain my cumulative happiness.

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I'm hoping they cast more than one Juliette. I know the role is a taxing one, but I kept watching Noelani Pantastico during the run, and she seemed to be increasingly tired at the end of each performance I saw.

(to be fair, they tried the last time, but injuries got in the way)

I'm wondering who else might get a chance at it...

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I'm hoping for three Juliets, especially since it's the beginning of the season, and I hope there's an understudy. I think Rachel Foster would be terrific; I'd also love to see a tall Juliet. Young teenage girls are often taller than the boys.

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I'm wondering who else might get a chance at it...

My wish list (hey! a person can dream, right?):

Carla Korbes (I'd say probable barring unforeseen circumstances)

Maria Chapman

Rachel Foster

Lindsi Dec

Sarah Orza

Liora Reshef

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I'm wondering who else might get a chance at it...

My wish list (hey! a person can dream, right?):

Carla Korbes (I'd say probable barring unforeseen circumstances)

She learned the part when it was first staged, but got injured and had to withdraw.

Maria Chapman

She'd be an interesting choice, but her Rosaline is so good I don't know that they'll think of her as Juliette

Lindsi Dec

The tallness thing would be interesting here. So far the Romeos they've fielded have been medium sized.

Sarah Orza

Hadn't thought of her, but can see it. She's having a lot of opportunities this year.

Liora Reshef

I can certainly imagine her learning the part this time around, but don't know that she'd get to perform yet.

I'm thinking that Mara Vinson might get a turn at this.

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Lindsi Dec

The tallness thing would be interesting here. So far the Romeos they've fielded have been medium sized.

I'm thinking that Mara Vinson might get a turn at this.

Karel Cruz with Lindsi Dec? Should be good chemistry there. :ermm:

And Kaori has been so strong lately.

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Thinking about the whole ballet, there are several good female parts, and with Louise N and Jodie T leaving, they'll have to replace them (Lady Capulet and Nurse) as well as find a (couple?) new Juliettes. Sounds like juicy opportunities all round!

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I too am excited by the prospect of seeing this R&J again.

I think sandik has findered the "sensible" choice with Mara Vinson, but for a long time now I've been hoping against hope that Rachel Foster gets it. The contrast in personality and style btwn Carla and Rachel would be a joy to watch. I too like the idea of Dec and Cruz......and let's not dismiss the fabulous marketing potential of leaking out the juicy story of a real live couple in love, playing the most famous love couple in literature (not to mention the appeal such a story line would have with the younger audience). My list is pretty much like Chocmel's. Ever since I saw Sarah Orza in Emeralds, I've been thinking how how terrific Sarah would be as Juliette. (OK, again...then do you go nutz and make Seth Romeo too?? Pretty cool I'd say.) Chapman certainly deserves it, and would do a great job, but somehow I wonder. She could be a sleeper and blow all our socks off. Then of course I have to put a plug in for my very special Leslie Rausch, but as much as I consider myself her numbero uno fan, I don't think she's right for this role.

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Well then, who would you like to see as the Nurse of Lady Capulet (besides the dancers who've already performed the parts.)

Nurse: If she doesn't dance Juliette, I think Vinson might do well here -- she has a sunny aspect to her dancing that could work well in the humorous sections. Kari Brunson might also shine here, especially in the scene with Juliette in the bedroom (I'm thinking of that long and loopy pointing gesture "you come here!")

Lady Capulet: After watching her Odile again, I'd like to see Kaori Nakamura in this -- she could be quite avaricious and predatory. Or maybe Mirnda Weese (that's just intuition talking, I can't put my finger on what I've seen her do that makes me want to see her do this...)

And who should play Tybalt?

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Good questions sandik :crying:. I'll take a whack.

The 1st person that comes to my mind for the nurse is Chalnessa Eames, but she was cast as the nurse last time. So who will replace Jodi? (One can't replace Jodi in this role......she will always be the best nurse ever I think.) I'd like to see Jordan Pacitti do it.....but of course that doesn't work either. Laura Gilbreath would be great IMHO, but is she too tall? I like your suggestion of Mara. I also think Foster would be terrific as the nurse if she doesn't do Juliette. If I had to decide today, I'd go with your excellent suggestion of Kari Brunson.

I like your idea of Kaori for Lady Capulet. Her performance in Tharp's "Afternoon Ball" as a woman of power was unforgetable. I think her character comes more to the surface the more wild the character she plays is. Arianna already does it of course. If I were Peter Boal, I'd attempt to talk Louise Nadeau into a "guest" performance for Lady Capulet. It fits her like a glove. Failing that, I'd go with Carrie Imler, or your suggestion of Miranda Weese (how much longer will Miranda be dancing tho?). This would be a good one for Kari Brunson too.

Tybalt? To be honest I was never a big fan of Casey Herd (a fan to be sure, but not a big fan); but he was fantasic in this role. After seeing Casey, I would want someone equally menacing. Jeffrey Stanton might pull that off. Olivier Wevers could, but if anyone dares to suggest that anyone but Olivier play the Friar, I will picket outside the opera house! How about Barry Kerollis? And wouldn't it be interesting to see either William Lin-Yee or Sokvannara Sar as Tybalt?

And I'd like to see apprentice Sean Rollofson in one of the macho roles.

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There was a note in the latest program that next year's "Coppelia" will be a redesign by Roberta Guidi do Nagno ("The Merry Widow"), and sets and costumes are already under construction by PNB's shops.

There was also a note that the PNB Box Office will be closed from June 15-July 19th, reopening for summer hours (M-F, 9-5) on July 20, resuming regular hours on Tuesday, 8 September.

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Though there's nothing I can find on the PNB website to confirm, according to the Joyce website, PNB will perform in New York on January 5-10.

Pacific Northwest Ballet, now under the direction of Peter Boal, makes its Joyce debut with East Coast premieres recently choreographed for the company by Twyla Tharp and Benjamin Millepied. Tharp's Opus 111, set to a Brahms string quintet, effuses vivacious folk flavor, while Millepied's 3 Movements features a large ensemble performing to a driving minimalist score by Steve Reich. The program also includes Marco Goecke's volatile solo Mopey and Edwaard Liang's Für Alina, an episodic duet created in 2006.

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Well, Millepied is going to be in town later this year, and I don't imagine it's just for the seafood. Perhaps he'll be refreshing their production of his work...

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According to Carla Korbes' latest blog entry on "The Winger", she and Seth Orza performed the Balcony Pas de Deux from Maillot's "Romeo et Juliette" at Vail.

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Seattle Metropolitan magazine interviews Lucien Postlewaite about Romeo in the season opener, Maillot's "Romeo et Juliette".

http://www.seattlemet.com/arts-and-enterta...-juliette-0909/

For a dancer, what distinguishes this Roméo et Juliette from more conventional story ballets?

When the stagers were here working with us they kept telling us to shed our ballet postures. And usually there’s a lot of pantomime and gesture in traditional story ballets. But it’s about the acting here—as opposed to gesturing I love you, I have to act it. The choreography is infused with so much emotion that it doesn’t require a really obvious and overt kind of gesture.

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