leonid17

Diaghilev Ballet Russe Centenary Celebration 2009

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Last night I attended what must be one of the earlier events in this Diaghilev Ballet Russe centenary celebration year. It was an illustrated talk by Princess Nina Lobanov Rostovsky covering the life and work and Serge Diaghilev and held in Pushkin House, Bloomsbury Square, London organised by the Great Britain Russia Society.

The Princess is a writer and lecturer on Russian decorative arts and Russian stage design, and consults for Christie’s International and Sotheby’s. The Princess and her husband Prince Nikita have an important private collection of Diaghilev material items from which they have generously loaned material to various important exhibitions over the years. She has co-curated numerous exhibitions of Russian theatrical art – designs for ballet, theatre and opera – in North America, Germany, Japan and Russia, and was a consultant for the Diaghilev Exhibition and Festival in the Netherlands in 2005.

Pushkin House is a building of more than 200 years old was a suitable venue for such an event with its lofty ceilings and chandeliers, mildly evocative of a minor St. Petersburg Mansion of the same period.

The audience included ballet enthusiasts, archivists, Russian speakers and a good number of Russians currently settled in London.

The Princess covered Diaghilev’s early life with an insight into the family status and home activities, in a manner that was evocative of pre-revolutionary Russian domestic life of a certain class in Perm where Diaghilev spent his early life.

She created a very real picture of his father, outlining his character and status. But it was the very detailed information about his step-mother who introduced a rich musical atmosphere into their home life that was especially interesting. Her undoubted influence was such that when he left Perm to go to St. Petersburg University to study law he also studied composition with Rimsky-Korsakov and singing with the famous baritone Cotogni. Fortunately for us today, he showed no great talent for either of these enthusiasms.

Princess Nina introduced all the characters from the World of Art (Mir Iskusstva) period and the early forays into staging important exhibitions. She related how in 1907 Diaghilev introduced to Paris the figures of Sergei Rachmaninoff, Alexander Glazunov, Alexander Scriabin, and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov who conducted their compositions, as well as conducting the works of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Alexander Borodin and Mikhail Glinka.

She went on to remind us of Diaghilev’s introducing to Paris in 1908 the Russian opera with the already legendary Fyodor Chaliapin.

From there on the talk was all about the ballet describing the decors and costumes, bringing them to life with vivid slides and numerous photographs of those involved in the productions.

We were told about the tours, the terrible state of the Ballet Russe Company’s finances and the fact that Diaghilev was never to own a home of his own.

Diaghilev has been likened to the Roman patron of the arts Maecenas which, considering the number of artistic careers he supported and encouraged, is a fair comparison. Sadly, he lacked the personal wealth of that earlier patron of the arts and Diaghilev’s great artistic success was matched by a continuous fight against debt and the search for patrons.

This was a fitting start for me to a centenary of a man I never knew but whose work and its history have been abiding passions since my teenage.

I was introduced to the Princess and had a short conversation, which confirmed both her knowledge and her attractive and lively personality.

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Leonid, you are so fortunate to have been able to attend. Thank you for sharing it with us. I love the specificity of detail in comments such as the following --

The Princess covered Diaghilev’s early life with an insight into the family status and home activities, in a manner that was evocative of pre-revolutionary Russian domestic life of a certain class in Perm where Diaghilev spent his early life.

She created a very real picture of his father, outlining his character and status. But it was the very detailed information about his step-mother who introduced a rich musical atmosphere into their home life that was especially interesting. Her undoubted influence was such, that when he left Perm to go to the St. Petersburg University to study law, he also studied composition with Rimsky-Korsakov and singing with the famous baritone Cotogni.

Will there be an exhibition in London similar to the Edinburgh exhibition that the focus of Richard Buckle's book?

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Thank you so much Leonid! As Bart said, the specificity is so vivid, as I'm sure the talk must have been. What strikes me as unique is that the Princess has such a long and personal relationship with the artifacts of the era, and is so knowledgeable about them, that it must have been very rewarding to hear.

I have read about Diaghilev's stepmother -- we can all be grateful she came into his life.

As you, Leonid, know, I posted a notice about a conference that will be in Cambridge, MA in April (it's in "Heads Up"). I am wondering how to find out about other Diaghilev anniversary events this year. Does anyone else know?

I'm glad you've set an example, and that we'll all submit posts about these events.

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Thank you so much Leonid! As Bart said, the specificity is so vivid, as I'm sure the talk must have been. What strikes me as unique is that the Princess has such a long and personal relationship with the artifacts of the era, and is so knowledgeable about them, that it must have been very rewarding to hear.

I have read about Diaghilev's stepmother -- we can all be grateful she came into his life.

As you, Leonid, know, I posted a notice about a conference that will be in Cambridge, MA in April (it's in "Heads Up"). I am wondering how to find out bout other Diaghilev anniversary events this year. Does anyone else know?

I'm glad you've set an example, and that we'll all submit posts about these events.

I was grateful for your information on the Cambridge MA conference and please find herewith a list of events I have found. More to follow.

xxxIF YOU HAVE DETAILS OF EXHIBITIONS/EVENTS OR PERFORMANCES RELATED TO THE CENTENARY NOT LISTED PLEASE POST

BOSTON

BALLETS RUSSES 2009 ANNOUNCES SYMPOSIUM

The Spirit of Diaghilev May 19-21, 2009

http://www.ballets-russes.com/symposium.html

BARNARD COLLEGE

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Celebrating Diaghilev in Music and Dance: Afternoon of a Faun and Les Noces

Saturday,April25,2009

http://www.barnard.columbia.edu/dance/calendar.html

AUSTRALIA

Australian Ballet

Excellent Ballet Russe resource page

http://www.nla.gov.au/balletsrusses/

NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

Diaghilev's Theater of Marvels: The Ballets Russes and Its Aftermath

June 26, 2009 through September 12, 2009

Donald and Mary Oenslager Gallery

http://www.nypl.org/research/calendar/excal.cfm#509

LONDON

VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM

Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes 1900-1939

18 September 2010 - 16 January 2011

Note: On the occasion of the centenary, the V&A Theatre and Performance Department are offering group visits to view selected costumes and objects from its Diaghilev Ballets Russes collections. These will take place from Monday 27 April - Friday 1 May 2009 at 14.00 - 15.00. These sessions will be led by Jane Pritchard, Co-curator of the 2010 exhibition:

http://www.vam.ac.uk/tco/exhibitions/futur...tions/index.htm

HARVARD THEATRE COLLECTION

HARVARD UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LIBRARY

Diaghilev's Ballet Russe 1909-1929

TWENTY YEARS THAT CHANGEDTHE WORLD OF ART

An Exhibition and a Symposium

15-17 April 2009

http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/houghton/...ml#registration

STOCKHOLM

Dansmuseet

Diaghilev Exhibition

May 15 2009-January 10 2010

http://www.dansmuseet.nu/english/exhibitio...itions-eng.html

The City of Perm is holding an International Diaghilev Festival including the unveiling of a monument to celebrate Diaghilev's achievements see http://www.t7.ru/ds/diary.phtml?lang=eng

The Philadelphia orchestra under their new conductor will pay tribute to Diaghilev in their programming this season see: <a href="http://www.philorch.org/pdfs/Dutoit_begins_as_Chief_Conductor_and_Artistic_Adviser.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.philorch.org/pdfs/Dutoit_begins...tic_Adviser.pdf[/url]

A sidelight on a minor Diaghilev collaborator the composer Lord Berners http://www.gavinbryars.com/Pages/writing_Lord_Berners.html

If your are interested in research, here is a link to the International Directory of Performing Arts Collections and Institutions http://www.sibmas.org/idpac/index.html://http://www.t7.ru/ds/diary.phtml?lan...dpac/index.html</a>

it lists by country and then by city and town.

New additions 02.13pm

PS

Ballets Russes

2009

Russian Revel

May 16 - 23rd

Boston, MA

Ballets Russes 2009, a non-profit organization created to celebrate the Ballets Russes centenary will stage a Russian Revel on May 22nd, 2008 at the Cutler Majestic Theater. A gala dinner will follow at the Four Seasons. The evening will feature prima ballerina, Nina Ananiashvili of the Bolshoi Ballet and American Ballet Theater. She will dance The Dying Swan. Mikhail Martyniuk and Kristina Kretova will dance a pas de deux from Le Pavillion d'Armide by Nicholas Tcherepnine. Three Russian bass singers, Alexey Tikhomirov, Vladimir Kudashev, and Mikhail Guzhov, will perform arias from Boris Godunov and Prince Igor. Yevgeny Yevtushenko will read his poetry.

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What a wonderful compilation of events. Thanks, leonid.

I have a question about the photo used to illustrate the Macaulay piece. Surely that isn't Nijinksy? :)

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What a wonderful compilation of events. Thanks, leonid.

I have a question about the photo used to illustrate the Macaulay piece. Surely that isn't Nijinksy? :)

Absolutely not! I would think this is fairly recent given the costume and photograph style and quality.

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I attended what must be one of the earlier events in this Diaghilev Ballet Russe centenary celebration year. It was an illustrated talk by Princess Nina Lobanov Rostovsky covering the life and work and Serge Diaghilev and held in Pushkin House, Bloomsbury Square, London organised by the Great Britain Russia Society.

The Princess is a writer and lecturer on Russian decorative arts and Russian stage design, and consults for Christie’s International and Sotheby’s. The Princess and her husband Prince Nikita, have an important private collection of Diaghilev material items from which they have generously loaned material to various important exhibitions over the years. She has co-curated numerous exhibitions of Russian theatrical art – designs for ballet, theatre and opera – in North America, Germany, Japan and Russia, and was a consultant for the Diaghilev Exhibition and Festival in the Netherlands in 2005.

Pushkin House is a building of more than 200 years old was a suitable venue for such an event with its lofty ceilings and chandeliers, mildly evocative of a minor St. Petersburg Mansion of the same period.

The audience included ballet enthusiasts, archivists, Russian speakers and a good number of Russians currently settled in London.

The Princess covered Diaghilev’s early life with an insight into the family status and home activities, in a manner that was evocative of pre-revolutionary Russian domestic life of a certain class in Perm where Diaghilev spent his early life.

She created a very real picture of his father, outlining his character and status. But it was the very detailed information about his step-mother who introduced a rich musical atmosphere into their home life that was especially interesting. Her undoubted influence was such, that when he left Perm to go to the St. Petersburg University to study law, he also studied composition with Rimsky-Korsakov and singing with the famous baritone Cotogni. Fortunately for us today, he showed no great talent for either of these enthusiasms.

The Princess Nina introduced all the characters from the World of Art (Mir Iskusstva) period and the early forays into staging important exhibitions. She related how in 1907 how Diaghilev introduced to Paris the figures of Sergei Rachmaninoff, Alexander Glazunov, Alexander Scriabin, and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov who conducted their compositions, as well as conducting the works of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Alexander Borodin and Mikhail Glinka.

She went on to remind us of Diaghilev’s introducing to Paris in 1908 the Russian opera with the already legendary Feodor Chaliapin.

From there on, the talk was all about the ballet describing the decors and costumes bringing them to life with vivid slides and numerous photographs of those involved in the productions.

We were told about the tours, the terrible state of the Ballet Russe Company’s finances and the fact that Diaghilev was never to own a home of his own.

Diaghilev has been likened to the Roman patron of the arts Maecenas which considering the number of artistic careers he supportedand encouraged, is a fair comparison. Sadly, he lacked the personal wealth of that earlier patron of the arts and Diaghilev’s great artistic success was matched by a continuous fight against debt and the search for patrons.

This was a fitting start for me to a centenary of a man I never knew but whose work and the history of his work, has been an abiding passion since my teenage.

I was introduced to the Princess and had a short conversation, which confirmed both her knowledge and her attractive and lively personality.

I am new to Ballet Talk and forums in general. Your synopsis of the Princess' talk is very interesting, thank you, and makes me wish for more. I wonder if you know whether her talk was recorded.

Marisa

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Welcome to Ballet Talk, Marisa. We hope you'll be with us for a long time! If you get the chance, it would be wonderful if you could introduce yourself to the rest of the members on our Welcome forum.

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I am new to Ballet Talk and forums in general. Your synopsis of the Princess' talk is very interesting, thank you, and makes me wish for more. I wonder if you know whether her talk was recorded.

Marisa

As far as I could see the talk was not recorded. I did not write in detail every thing she talked about as I am aware that some of my posts are rather long which embarasses me.

Put it down to my age.

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Marisa, you might be interested to know that Richard Buckle's biography of Diaghilev contains an interesting account of the family background and his early years.

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More events

PLEASE CHECK WEBSITES IN ALL INSTANCES IN CASE ERRORS HAVE CREPT IN

SALT LAKE CITY

BALLET WEST

Treasures of the Ballets Russes

27 March to 27-April 4, 2009

Les Biches

The Prodigal Son

The Polovtsian Dances

http://www.balletwest.org/PerformancesAndT...s/BalletsRusses

OAKLAND

OAKLAND BALLET

October 23-25, 2009

Programme to include

Les Biches, Boutique Fantasque,Train Bleu,

L’Apres midi d’un Faune

http://www.rgfpa.org/

CHICAGO

JOFFREY BALLET

February 18 to March 1, 2009

Hand of Fate

Cotillon Pas de deux-after Balanchine by Millicent Hodson and Kenneth Archer.

Rite of Spring-Nijinsky reconstruction by Millicent Hodson and Kenneth Archer

Plus other works

http://www.joffrey.org/index.asp

MONTE CARLO

LES BALLET DE MONTE CARLO

December 2009

Le Sacre du Printemps

http://www.balletsdemontecarlo.com/present...ml?atelier.html

ROME

Ballet OF ROME OPERA

Les Sylphides -Michel Fokine

Les Biches - Bronislava Nijinska / Howard Sayette

Cléopâtre - Michel Fokine reconstruction Viatcheslav Khomyakov

Le Tricorne- Léonide Massine staged by Susanne Della Pietra

The Firebird - Michel Fokine staged Nicolay Androsov

Performances in April 2009 check website http://www.operaroma.it/

Translation available

MUNICH

BAVARIAN STATE BALLET

Sunday, 10 May 2009

An evening is dedicated to the “Ballets RussesThe three-part ballet program “100 Years Ballets Russes” will present two Munich premieres of works from Diaghilev’s repertoire, “Shéhérazade” by Mikhail Fokine and “Les Biches” by Bronislava Nijinskaja, together with a creation “Once Upon An Ever After”, a work the young choreographer Terence Kohler

Shéhérazade - Mikhail Fokine reconstructed Isabelle Fokine

Les Biches - Bronislava Nijinska

Once Upon An Ever After-Terence Kohler

HAMBURG

HAMBURG BALLET

Premieres

The Prodigal Son – George Balanchine

Le Pavillon d'Armide -John Neumeier

Le Sacre du Printemps - Millicent Hodson reconstruction

June 28 | 30; July 11, 2009

Revivals

Daphnis and Chloe/Afternoon of a Faun/

Le Sacre

July 9 2009

100 Years Ballets Russes – Jubilee Performance

Nijinsky

May 19, 2009

Nijinsky Gala XXXV

July 12, 2009

http://www.hamburgballett.de/e/index.htm

HAMBURG KUNSTERHALLE

BALLET RUSSE EXHIBITION

19 May 2009 – 16 August 2009

On 19 May 2009 it will be exactly one hundred years since the renowned ballet dancer Vaslav Nijinsky made his first spectacular performance with the Ballets Russes in Paris. To mark this occasion, the Hamburger Kunsthalle is presenting “Nijinsky’s Eye”, an exhibition of around 100 paintings and drawings by Nijinsky that are mainly held in the collection of the John Neumeier Foundation. They are being shown in the context of predominantly Russian painters working in Paris between 1910 and 1930 who portrayed the themes of dance, rhythm and motion in abstract depictions. The featured artists include Sonia Delaunay Terk, Alexandra Ekster, Vladimir Baranoff-Rossiné, Léopold Survage and Frantisek Kupka. The abstract colour compositions are dominated by luminously intense hues and circular, arched or curved forms with strong rhythmic qualities that abstractly evoke the movement, lightness and virtuosity of dance as one of the fundamental forms of human expression.

Exhibited artists: Sonia Delaunay Terk, Alexandra Ekster, Vladimir Baranoff-Rossiné, Léopold Survage and Frantisek Kupka.

http://www.hamburger-kunsthalle.de/start/en_start.html

Do check out the Wadsworth Atheneum website for information on their exhibition starting 19 February 2009

http://www.wadsworthatheneum.org/view/exhi...amp;type=Future

***ADDED 17 FEBRUARY 2009***

LONDON

Society for Co-operation in Russian and Soviet Studies

06 March 2009

Diaghilev and the Ballet Russe

An illustrated talk by Charlotte Kasner

01 April 2009

An exhibition about ‘Mir Isskustva(The World of Art)

to include material from the State Museum of Theatre and Music

in St.Petersburg.

http://www.scrss.org.uk/cinemaevents.htm

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HAMBURG KUNSTERHALLE[/b]

19 May 2009 – 16 August 2009

[ ... ] They are being shown in the context of predominantly Russian painters working in Paris between 1910 and 1930 who portrayed the themes of dance, rhythm and motion in abstract depictions. The featured artists include Sonia Delaunay Terk, Alexandra Ekster, Vladimir Baranoff-Rossiné, Léopold Survage and Frantisek Kupka. The abstract colour compositions are dominated by luminously intense hues and circular, arched or curved forms with strong rhythmic qualities that abstractly evoke the movement, lightness and virtuosity of dance as one of the fundamental forms of human expression.

I am impressed by this approach. It broadens the idea of the "influence" of Diaghileve/Russian dance on the arts. It would also be a chance to see the work of artists not as well known as those who are always being reproduced.

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Do check out the Wadsworth Atheneum website for information on their exhibition starting 19 May 2009

http://www.wadsworthatheneum.org/view/exhi...amp;type=Future

According to their website the Wadsworth exhibit starts FEBRUARY 19 and continues to MAY 24. A good exhibit and only 30 minutes away from me, hooray!

Thanks. I have corrected the date. Please give a report or an impression of the event if you are able to attend. It is all history after all.

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I am new to Ballet Talk and forums in general. Your synopsis of the Princess' talk is very interesting, thank you, and makes me wish for more. I wonder if you know whether her talk was recorded.

Marisa

As far as I could see the talk was not recorded. I did not write in detail every thing she talked about as I am aware that some of my posts are rather long which embarasses me.

Put it down to my age.

I only saw this just now. NO, the longer the better! I want all the details of something like hearing the Princess's talk that someone has time to notate. My posts are often long, and I'm never embarassed about it even if I should be. This was a great report.

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Thanks so much for posting this info... a little digging on the Wadsworth site produced this:

In addition the museum will present programs of related films and music plus special lectures by a leading Ballets Russes scholar, Lynn Garafola, and the dance critic of the New York Times, Alastair Macauley. For the 2009 Centennial, the Boston Festival will produce a lavish volume of reproductions and essays, including one by Atheneum curator, Eric Zafran, on the Russian Ballet in Hartford, which will be available in the museum shop.

Diaghilev and Style - Alistair Macaulay, Chief Dance Critic for the New York Times

Wednesday Apr 15, 09

Serge Diaghilev and the Adventure of Ballet Modernism - Public Talk

Sunday May 17, 09 - noon

Also, it seems that this week , February 18-20, there are free “discovery” events from 1:30-3:00 for kids aged 7-12 (with adult):

Join the museum teachers for a morning or afternoon of galley explorations, interactive games, and art projects. This month, explore the special exhibition The Ballets Russes: Celebrating the Centennial
.

And there's something being done by Full Force dance theater, but as I try to find it again, I can't... perhaps someone else will.

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Boston Ballet's programme contribution to the Ballet Russe Centenary, runs from 14 - 17 May 2009 with the following ballets being performed

The Prodigal Son

MUSIC: Sergei Prokofiev

CHOREOGRAPHY: George Balanchine

Afternoon of a Faun

MUSIC: Claude Debussy

CHOREOGRAPHY: Vaslav Nijinsky

Le Spectre de la Rose

MUSIC: Carl Maria von Weber

CHOREOGRAPHY: Michel Fokine

Le Sacre du Printemps

MUSIC: Igor Stravinsky

CHOREOGRAPHY: Jorma Elo (World Premiere)

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HARRIMAN INSTITUTE COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Although some events have already taken place there, the Harriman Institute at Columbia University is presenting a continuing series of events celebrating and linked to the Diaghilev Centenary as follows:

Diaghilev – era Russian Dancers on Film

Thursday 12 March 2009-03-06

EXHIBIT: Homage to Diaghilev: Enduring Legacy

Tuesday 31 March 2009 – 22 May 2009

The Fate of the Bolshoi and Maryinsky Theatres after 1917

Monday 13 April 2009-03-06

Between Neoclassicism and Surrealism: Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in the Context of the Russian-French Connection, 1900s-1920s

Thursday, 23 April 2009–Saturday, 25 April 2009

Celebrating Diaghilev in Music and Dance: Afternoon of a Faun and Les Noces

Saturday, 25 April 2009, 8:00pm

Check their website as the programme looks more than just interesting: http://www.harrimaninstitute.org/events/le...s.html?id=balle

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I was at the Wadsworth today to meet some friends and watch the movie Ballets Russes again. I enjoyed it just as much as the first time, but for different parts (must have been lost in thought first time around, I guess). They did a wonderful job on the exhibit this time. I went the last two times they've had some of their archive out, and it's really nicely done this year. They've gone to the trouble of projecting reconstructions of the ballets on the walls of the galleries showing costumes & designs... it makes the experience more accessible to the general public, I think (if you have no clue of the Ballets Russes oevre, you're not as in awe perhaps of seeing the original designs). I was surprised not to see their original Bakst of Nijinski as the Faun... perhaps this is on loan to Boston?? Still very worth coming to see. The designs are just so sumptuous. I wonder if the lessor role costumes were more likely to survive as perhaps the dancers wearing them sweated less? Some of the costumes look so hot, it's hard to imagine wearing them under stage lights... perhaps lighting was less intense in the old days?

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I was at the Wadsworth today to meet some friends and watch the movie Ballets Russes again. I enjoyed it just as much as the first time, but for different parts (must have been lost in thought first time around, I guess). They did a wonderful job on the exhibit this time. I went the last two times they've had some of their archive out, and it's really nicely done this year. They've gone to the trouble of projecting reconstructions of the ballets on the walls of the galleries showing costumes & designs... it makes the experience more accessible to the general public, I think (if you have no clue of the Ballets Russes oevre, you're not as in awe perhaps of seeing the original designs). I was surprised not to see their original Bakst of Nijinski as the Faun... perhaps this is on loan to Boston?? Still very worth coming to see. The designs are just so sumptuous. I wonder if the lessor role costumes were more likely to survive as perhaps the dancers wearing them sweated less? Some of the costumes look so hot, it's hard to imagine wearing them under stage lights... perhaps lighting was less intense in the old days?

Many thanks for posting Amy. Great to hear your views on the event and it sounds successful from what you have told us. Hope it encourages everyone who saw it to learn more about the history of the Ballet Russe without which I doubt we would have the classical and neo classical ballet we know today.

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Three more Ballet Russes scheduals of performances not yet listed:

Ballets Russes

Les Sylphides

Apollo

The Dying Swan

Schéhérazade

The Rite of Spring (chor Kenneth MacMillan)

L'Après-midi d'un faune (chor David Dawson)

Le Spectre de la Rose

June 16 - 20, 2009

English National Ballet, Sadler's Wells, London

100 Years of Les Ballets Russes

Les Sylphides

Scheherazade (chor Krzysztof Pastor)

Le fils prodigue

June 19 - 27, 2009

Het Nationale Ballet, Amsterdam

Soirée Ballets Russes

program not announced

Dec 12 - 31, 2009

Ballet de l'Opéra de Paris

The total number of exhibitions announced numbers 10. And plans for the promised Paris show are yet to be unveiled!

To recap and update those already mentioned:

The Ballets Russes: Celebrating the Centennial

Feb 19, 2009 - June 21, 2009

Wadsworth Atheneum, New Haven

Homage to Diaghilev: Enduring Legacy

Mar 31, 2009 - May 22, 2009

Harriman Institute, Columbia University, New York

Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, 1909 - 1929: Twenty Years that Changed the World of Art

Apr 15, 2009 - Aug 28, 2009

Pusey Library, Harvard University, Cambridge

Ballets Russes in Paris, 1909 - 2009

May 15, 2009 - Jan. 10, 2010

Dansmuseet, Stockholm

Étonne-Moi!: the Ballets Russes and the Art of the New

May 20, 2009 - ?

808 Gallery, Boston University

Tanz der Farben. Nijinskys Auge und die Abstraktion

(Dance of Colours. Nijinsky's Eye and Abstraction)

May 20, 2009 - Aug 16, 2009

Hamburger Kunsthalle, Hamburg, Germany

Diaghilev's Theater of Marvels: The Ballets Russes and Its Aftermath

Jun 26, 2009 - Sept 12, 2009

Donald and Mary Oenslager Gallery, New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

Étonne-Moi!

July 9, 2009 - Sept 20, 2009

Nouveau Musée National de Monaco, Villa Sauber

Oct 27, 2009 - Jan 24, 2010

Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow

Ballets Russes: The Art of Costume

Dec 4, 2009 - Apr 26, 2010

National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1900-1939

Sept 18, 2010 - Jan 16, 2011

Victoria and Albert Museum, London

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Three more Ballet Russes scheduals of performances not yet listed:

Thank you phenby for your most useful contribution.

I would ask that if any balletalkers visit the exhibitions or performances now listed, do give a report and please describe catalogues or programmes.

I said it before and I will say it again, without Diaghilev, ballet would not exist in the manner it does today. It is not just the works he produced, its the countless

people he inspired in all fields related to ballet and his legacy, makes a fine partner to the legacy of the Imperial St. Petersburg Ballet repertoire.

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Slight Correction: The Wadsworth is in Hartford

The Ballets Russes: Celebrating the Centennial

Feb 19, 2009 - June 21, 2009

Wadsworth Atheneum, New Haven

With Lectures by Alistair MacCaulay (Wed. April 15 & Lynn Garafola Sun, May 17) and videos of the ballets projected on the walls next to the costumes & set designs

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