Jump to content


Skirts in Rubiesfirst tights, now skirts, and moving on up the torso...


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 emilienne

emilienne

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 172 posts

Posted 24 January 2009 - 11:19 AM

Along with the discussion on Apollo's tights, I wonder when the women in Rubies stopped using the puffy white skirts and began to use the red herald skirts. In A Man Who Dances (or one of the televised performances), McBride is clearly wearing the white puffs, but by her performance in Ballet with Edward Villella, she, M Morris, and the corp, looks to have switched over to a red generic overskirt. However, if you look at the Life pictures, the corp was already wearing the pointy herald skirts in 1967. Were there multiple versions of the costume?

Can BTers think to when the costuming change was made, and why? Do any companies use the white puff dresses anymore?

Happens to like the white cotton puffs quite a lot
emi

#2 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,434 posts

Posted 24 January 2009 - 11:49 AM

perhaps the best person to help date this change would be mcbride herself.
the 'original' designs were still considered current when MAN WHO DANCES sent out the attached publicity shot in early '68.
the 'connection' i find in this version of the Rubies' ballerina's costume is to the showgirl look Karinska devised for WESTERN SYMPHONY.
it would be interesting to learn if the change came at the ballerina's suggestion/request or the designer's or Balanchine's, or a combination of all three.

Attached Files



#3 Amy Reusch

Amy Reusch

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,750 posts

Posted 24 January 2009 - 09:56 PM

Please excuse my ignorance, but why are they called "herald" skirts?

#4 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 25 January 2009 - 07:35 AM

Please excuse my ignorance, but why are they called "herald" skirts?

I don't know the answer to that, but I Googled "herald skirt" and found some pictures that reminded me of Andre Eglesvsky's mini-kilt in Apollo, photos of which are posted on the Apollo-costume thread. (Incidentally, emilienne's question had already turned up on Google as number 3 in the responses to my Search. They work fast :wink: .)

#5 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,434 posts

Posted 25 January 2009 - 09:04 AM

i've never heard the term 'herald skirt' myself, which is neither here nor there.
i prefer to think of this this style garment as a kilt.

#6 emilienne

emilienne

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 172 posts

Posted 25 January 2009 - 10:00 AM

i've never heard the term 'hearld skirt' myself, which is neither here nor there.
i prefer to think of this this style garment as a kilt.


In any case I misspoke, I'd heard the skirt referred to somewhere else as a 'heraldic' skirt (though I can't remember where now), as the scalloped bottom of mediaeval tunics. For example, the tunic for this gentleman on the left.

emi

#7 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 25 January 2009 - 11:30 AM

Such a kilt, skirt, lower hem might be heraldrically described as "embattled to base".

#8 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,342 posts

Posted 25 January 2009 - 08:47 PM

Such a kilt, skirt, lower hem might be heraldrically described as "embattled to base".


Perhaps I'm living in the past, but I've always thought of a kilt as a skirt with knife pleats around 3/4 of the waistband and an overlapping flat front. The stereotype is Scotch, made of a plaid wool that was a family identifier, but that's certainly not the only kilt around. A local company makes kilts out of heavy duty canvas for construction workers, as well as more formal styles

Utilikilt

The skirt I know best for Rubies is a number of rectangles set on a waistband (long side vertical). I remember a white skirt in photos, but I don't think I've ever seen one in performance.

Tangentially, I thought that your Ballet Talk membership level (if that is the right term) is particularly appropriate for this conversation

Rubies Circle

#9 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 26 January 2009 - 04:35 AM

Kilts are not exclusively Scottish.

There are a great many cultures around the world where a skirt/kilt is part of male attire, and some are pleated and some not. Indeed the Scottish "Great Plaid" simply started as a very long piece of wool gathered by a belt. The pleats came later, as did most of the family tartans. Some of the early portraits of clan chieftains show them wearing three or more different patterns!

#10 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,434 posts

Posted 26 January 2009 - 06:12 AM

wonder if anyone knows (Mel?) the technical term for the individual strips/flaps - familiar on roman military kilts (in leather?) that are part of the men's and women's tunics in Karinska's designs for RUBIES - i had some communications with someone who would know a while back but lost my email.
the term seems also to be one for similar 'detailing' on upholstery, and i think comes from a french word for 'feather' tho' it isn't 'plume'.

#11 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:16 PM

Now a Roman soldier's belt was a cinculum, and I know I've seen the vertical strips that hung from it called "labels" or "flèches", when they're pointed, and plate armor where the thigh protectors that hung below the torso armor were called "tassets", but nothing that directly says "feather" to me.

#12 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,434 posts

Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:27 PM

many thanks Mel.
i suppose there is no one term.
the one suggested to me not that long ago wasn't any of these, which doesn't make the missing term correct, i'm just trying to re-acquaint myself w/ it.

#13 rg

rg

    Emeralds Circle

  • Editorial Advisor
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,434 posts

Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:37 PM

here's what i was looking for and no wonder i was 'in the dark' the word is from the GREEK (not French) for feathers:

Pteruges (pronounced “ter-OO-gees,” Greek for “feathers”) are flexible strips of layered leather or fabric that hang from the waist and shoulders of many forms of classical armor, forming a “kilt” protecting a soldier’s lower torso, thighs, and upper arms.

#14 carbro

carbro

    Late Board Registrar

  • Rest in Peace
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,361 posts

Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:24 PM

Now a Roman soldier's belt was a cinculum, and I know I've seen the vertical strips that hung from it called "labels" or "flèches", when they're pointed, and plate armor where the thigh protectors that hung below the torso armor were called "tassets", but nothing that directly says "feather" to me.

The attachments arrayed around a slightly dropped waist on the Rubies costumes come to a point, like flèches.

#15 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,342 posts

Posted 26 January 2009 - 02:08 PM

Kilts are not exclusively Scottish.


Oh, I know -- it's just the stereotype. With a bagpipe.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):