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Homogenization of the Classical Ballet RepertoireArticle in November 2008 Dancing Times


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#31 rg

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 12:17 PM

no apologies necessary.
just hoping to clarify some of the posts higher up as well.
one reading of Croce's 'the choreographer' in the sentence ending the passage quoted above, could have her meaning that 'any sensitive/inspired choreographer' could do the 'dreaming' for the observer of SWAN LAKE with such choices as those under discussion in her essay.
incidentally, the hunters don't dance with the swan maidens at any point; they enter the adagio twice, unobtrusively, to provide support and complete the tableau made up of Odette's sisters; by the adagio's end, they're gone. (or at least that's how they are deployed in Balanchine's SWAN LAKE.)

#32 kfw

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 01:08 PM

no apologies necessary.
just hoping to clarify some of the posts higher up as well.
one reading of Croce's 'the choreographer' in the sentence ending the passage quoted above, could have her meaning that 'any sensitive/inspired choreographer' could do the 'dreaming' for the observer of SWAN LAKE with such choices as those under discussion in her essay.

I'm the culprit here, not you, Hans. :( Thanks for clarifying, rg.

#33 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 08:12 PM

As far as I know, the hunters partnered the swan-maidens in the original Petipa-Ivanov production--each hunter had two swans.

I was actually thinking more about some characters from Act III.

#34 EricMontreal22

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Posted 05 May 2009 - 10:51 PM

It would be helpful to hear what "pastiche" -- a word which usually has quite negative connotations -- means in this context, especially as it applies to Balanchine's version of a classic text which has, in its history, often been subjected to reinterpretations, alterations, abridgements, expansions, and even distortions.


Is pastiche usually negative? I first came across it when I was obsessed with Stephen Sondheim's musical (with Hal prince and Michael Bennett) Follies, where half the score is pastiche of older musical composers--for instance Losing My Mind is a pastiche of Arlen. In that sense it's an affectionate hommage--and I think this is how Balanchine's Swan lake was intended too. I will agree it's not a work that's intended to be watched with the gravitas the original Act II would be (which is one reason, I admit, I'm not moved or fond of it, though I appreciate its details)

#35 Helene

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 11:04 AM

The discussion continues here with today's article by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.


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