Jump to content


Top Ten Irritating Phrasesgrrrr


  • Please log in to reply
129 replies to this topic

#91 Giannina

Giannina

    Gold Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 844 posts

Posted 20 November 2008 - 08:39 AM

Oh, please tell me you knew I was kidding with my "absolutely"

Giannina

#92 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,139 posts

Posted 23 November 2008 - 10:17 PM

Oh goodie, I finally get to say it: Misuse of the word "bemused." :thumbsup: It means bewildered, NOT amused. Far too many people, including journalists, misuse this word as a synonym for "amused."

I just came across a prime example in a photo capture on the International Figure Skating website. In the gala after Skate Canada, the Men's and Ladies' gold medallists, Patrick Chan and Joannie Rochette, both from Canada, were brought on the ice before they skated to subject themselves and the audience to silly banter. Rochette most certainly was not bemused by Chan's comment, and this is obvious from the photo (bottom left).

http://www.ifsmagazi...p...ost&id=1950

#93 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 24 November 2008 - 05:51 AM

Oh, please tell me you knew I was kidding with my "absolutely"

Absolutely, Giannina. I was kidding too. :clapping: :clapping:

Re: the "bemused"/"amused" confusion. How about "inferred"/"implied"? A while ago I came across an example in a NY Times blog piece by a fairly major writer.

Just now, I searched for "infer" on BT and can report that Ballet Talkers, at least, use it correcty. If I am permitted to include gestures on a thread devoted to "phrases," how about a big "High 5" for us! :thumbsup:

How about "lookit" for "look." As in: "Lookit! The snow has melted." Or, "lookit" instead of "look at." As in: "Lookit the beautiful detailing." Is this only found in U.S. English? It seems so common that it must be acceptible now. I hardly notice it.

#94 dancesmith

dancesmith

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 25 November 2008 - 08:10 AM

Awesome!

You go!

And lately - Good job!

#95 papeetepatrick

papeetepatrick

    Sapphire Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,486 posts

Posted 26 November 2008 - 07:53 PM

I've never heard anybody complain about this but me, it's a pronunciation that has changed for many over the decades: 'question' is often not pronounced 'ques-chun', but more and more 'quession' or even 'quezzion'. Come on, somebody must have noticed this version of vernacular and colloquial downturn...just like 'a couple beers.'

#96 Hans

Hans

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,104 posts

Posted 26 November 2008 - 08:39 PM

I haven't noticed that, papeetepatrick. Perhaps it's specific to New York or the northeastern US?

#97 4mrdncr

4mrdncr

    Silver Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 670 posts

Posted 27 November 2008 - 07:23 PM

TIME magazine this week misused the word "disinterested" in place of the correct "uninterested".
To paraphrase "Casablanca": I am "shocked! shocked...."
And I believe it was "the usual suspects'" fault.

#98 papeetepatrick

papeetepatrick

    Sapphire Circle

  • Inactive Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,486 posts

Posted 27 November 2008 - 08:39 PM

I haven't noticed that, papeetepatrick. Perhaps it's specific to New York or the northeastern US?


Maybe I didn't write it out phonetically quite right either. It's more like kwesh-un, like 'passion' and not like 'bastion'. Maybe just sloppy speech, but it could be regional, I'm not sure.

#99 Memo

Memo

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 141 posts

Posted 27 November 2008 - 11:49 PM

"Have fun"


seems to be the most important element of any activity these days, rather than concentrating, working hard, doing your best, or giving your all. Children must feel so confused when they are doing difficult things and struggling with it and constantly being told my adults that they are supposed to be having fun.

#100 kfw

kfw

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,270 posts

Posted 02 December 2008 - 06:50 PM

One linguistic fad I find especially ugly is the use of the present tense when it's the past that's being spoken of. For example, "So now he buys . . . " instead of "so then he bought . . ." Sportscasters do this a lot, but I hear talking heads on political shows doing it too.

#101 MakarovaFan

MakarovaFan

    Bronze Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 461 posts

Posted 06 December 2008 - 06:32 AM

"I, personally" drives me nuts!

#102 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 06 December 2008 - 06:58 AM

Damon Runyon used to use that sometimes, but it's had a New Birth of Redundancy as businesses and governments, ever vigilant for the litigatable moment, have informed employees that if they give opinions, they must be couched in self-disclaimers which are capable of conveying that the matter is opinion, and not empirical fact. "Speaking now only for myself, and not the museum...."

#103 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 06 December 2008 - 07:07 AM

One linguistic fad I find especially ugly is the use of the present tense when it's the past that's being spoken of. For example, "So now he buys . . . " instead of "so then he bought . . ." Sportscasters do this a lot, but I hear talking heads on political shows doing it too.

I've been thinking about this and can't make up my mind. Films do create the sense of a perpetual present. For example: "Now Bergman comes into the bar and Rick sees her." Using the past tense would suggest that you were talking narrowly about the time of shooting.

Maybe this has carried over to television, the land of the instant replay and the endless repetition of iconic visuial images.

#104 Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

    Diamonds Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,311 posts

Posted 06 December 2008 - 07:34 AM

This formation exists in Modern German, and some other languages. It's called "Historical Present". Maybe we're seeing some linguistic crossover.

#105 bart

bart

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,320 posts

Posted 06 December 2008 - 08:54 AM

This formation exists in Modern German, and some other languages. It's called "Historical Present". Maybe we're seeing some linguistic crossover.

This could be right.

In the U.S., use of the historical present is apparently increasing among bilingual speaks in a number of languages. This process affects both those for whom English is a second language and the younger generation who are fluent in both languages but use English primarily for school and work.

Among bilingual Spanish-speakers in the U.S., the more complicated verb tenses, gender agreement, etc., are often dropped. Simplification seems to be the main motivator, but changes in the way language is taught are probably factors too.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):