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Is anything vulgar (in dancing) today?


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#31 Mel Johnson

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Posted 22 November 2001 - 10:02 AM

Such is the nature of leitmotiv. It's even stranger in Madame Butterfly, where Pinkerton's motif is a little of the "Star-Spangled Banner" played somewhere in the harmony.

#32 felursus

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Posted 26 November 2001 - 02:52 AM

Throwing flowers on stage in the middle of a performance is nothing new - it's been going on since the 19th c. However, what really took the cake was during a run of the opera "Lucia di Lammermore" with Joan Sutherland at Covent Garden way back in the 70s, there were fans who insisted on throwing streamers onto the stage when Sutherland took a bow after her character dies. Unfortunately for the fans, there is yet another scene in the opera before the end, and the streamers risked the life of everyone in the theater, as some would land in the footlights, and the heat could cause the paper streamers to ignite - this without the problems that the other singers had trying to wade through ankle-deep piles of the streamers!

#33 anoushka

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Posted 26 November 2001 - 02:46 PM

I must say, the first time I saw the Kirov perform, I wasn't expecting them to stop and bow after each piece of dancing they did! It seemed to disrupt the whole flow of the balley- and also broke the spell of the other world on stage, when they stepped out and bowed! The more I've seen them, the more used to it I've got, but I am quite content with the usual curtain calls at the end of a performance!! tongue.gif

#34 Paul Parish

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Posted 25 February 2002 - 03:12 AM

re Carabosse's theme ( a long time back in he history of htis thread)


4ts:
yes you are right, and yet i always considered the music's echoing when carabosse enters to be a perversion of the original use of the music to introduce the ballet, since when it is first used it is so glorious and when it is echoed it is so sinister. anyone care to comment?

Carabosse came to the WEDDING, or at least is present at the apotheos, in the original version, George Jackson told me just the other night.
WHich I think is WONDERFUL, that she can be brought back into the family......


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