rg

What's taking place? Where? Why?

19 posts in this topic

this scan shows a publicity still connected to what ballet work and in what circumstances, etc.?

admittedly more off, than on, the beaten path, but with an actual ballet connection.

post-848-1219455061_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post

I'm surprised there have been no guesses from our experts on this one. My own thoughts about it included: (a) an olympic sprint for ciagrette girls, and possibly (b) a publicity photo for some sort of ballerina competition. Did the Rockettes ever wear pointe shoes? The ladies on the outside appear to be the "dark horses" of the group.

Share this post


Link to post

Native Dancers? The only thing is, these costumes don't seem to be from the same ballet as the one Wilde wears here.

Share this post


Link to post

to be sure this one is an oddity.

it's not NATIVE DANCERS but there is a balanchine connection.

Share this post


Link to post

Could the Balanchine connection be Saratoga Springs itself, before there was a SPAC?

Share this post


Link to post

not saratoga, and as i've noted this is an oddity, w/ a ballet connection to balanchine.

caption provided for this hand-out p.r. foto to follow soon.

Share this post


Link to post

Publicity shot for one of the films for which Balanchine did choreography?

Share this post


Link to post

Bart is closing in.

Share this post


Link to post

publicity copy, as attached to the back of the photo at the start of this thread: [see scan]

post-848-1219523028_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post

What a great athletic event!. :) But 3.9 seconds to run -- on pointe, on gress -- 25 yards??? :yucky: Congratultions to Virginia Hart. :thumbsup: I can certainly understand why "The girls believe the record will stand for a long time." :o

:toot:

Share this post


Link to post

if i had a puzzler of a Giselle-related photo i'd post it.

as i've noted, this item is a oddity, but, whatever it is (or isn't) in terms of notable ballet theater, it remains somewhat remarkable to think that in 1938, Hollywood would send out a ballet-related item like this as a potential entertainment story to 'your city' - i don't imagine that such a 'promotion' would be sent out nowadays concerning ballet, and one of its choreographers, from Hollywood.

Share this post


Link to post

it's not a question of like or dislike to me, anyway; it's amusing, it's puzzling, and it is a lot of fun, so i'm very grateful that rg does it! :)

Share this post


Link to post
if i had a puzzler of a Giselle-related photo i'd post it.

as i've noted, this item is a oddity, but, whatever it is (or isn't) in terms of notable ballet theater, it remains somewhat remarkable to think that in 1938, Hollywood would send out a ballet-related item like this as a potential entertainment story to 'your city' - i don't imagine that such a 'promotion' would be sent out nowadays concerning ballet, and one of its choreographers, from Hollywood.

I think that it's part of Warner Brothers' mantra of the 1930s, "Motion Pictures are your best entertainment!" What was seen as good was accessibility. Somebody YOU know could be "in the movies". Movies were almost universally available to the public, if even in improvised venues. Movies represent "community interests", although a foot race was more a local Los Angeles enthusiasm which was waning by 1939, but still there, it having been started by the 1932 Olympics.

Share this post


Link to post
What a great athletic event!. :) But 3.9 seconds to run -- on pointe, on gress -- 25 yards??? :yucky: Congratultions to Virginia Hart. :thumbsup: I can certainly understand why "The girls believe the record will stand for a long time." :o

You REALLY have to wonder if a contemporary ballerina could break 3.9 seconds travelling 25 yards en pointe. Especially if the ballerina could wear a custom-fitted pair of Gaynor Minden pointe shoes, which are structurally built like a real athletic shoe.

Share this post


Link to post

off the ballet topic but onto Mel's about the 1930s and the athletics in the air, this trading? card from the 1936 Olympics shows four real sprinters, none on pointe.

Frank Wykoff (USA), Paul Hanni (Switzerland), Ralph Metcalfe (USA), and Jesse Owens (USA).

post-848-1219619572_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post