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Ratmansky leaving Bolshoi helmand new premieres


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#46 swan

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 10:59 AM

Related to the above, I can confirm that the Hermitage Theater Ballet with Kirov-mariinsky & Mikhailovsky soloists will be touring the southeastern US next month, commencing with a gala in Savannah, GA, on February 8 '08. Stars include Irma Nioradze, Tatyana Tkachenko & Sergei Popov of the Kirov-Mariinsky & the divine Irina Perren of the Mikhailovly (ex-Maly). Oh...and Anastasia Kolegova who is on both the Kirov-Mariinsky and Mikhailovsky rosters (and is a huge favorite in Japan with her supermodel looks). The Hermitage's own principal ballerina, Alyona Klochkova, is also a stunner.

Below is a link to the dancers' page on the tour's website:

http://www.hermitage...7174/page/90754

Nataly, it's your post. Help me to find them, where they are now. I can't open this link. I ask you so much.

#47 carbro

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 11:30 AM

Thanks, swan,and welcome to BalletTalk.

It appears that Hermitage Ballet's website is down. I tried googling the company, and of several links I tried, none worked. :cool:

#48 Natalia

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 11:51 AM

Swan, the tour ended on Feb. 22 in Augusta, GA.

I was to have seen them in Atlanta on the 21st but Delta cancelled my flight out of DC National Airport & there were no other direct flights to Atlanta on that day so I just stayed home as I was traveling just for that one performance. Darn... At least I got money back from the airline and was able to cancel a one-night hotel stay in time to not be charged (whew!). Alas, I lost the price of the show ticket but those are the chances taken when traveling for performances. Oh...and I lost a half-day of Annual Leave from work...but ended up using it by relaxing at home for the rest of the afternoon (not a bad thing).

There were some really great dancers on that tour, so I am sorry to have missed them this time around. Hopefully they'll be back next season, as they've been promising.

Yup, the Hermitage Ballet web link is down for me too. Just tried it...

#49 Natalia

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 12:00 PM

Marc or anyone else in the know:

Was Burlaka responsible for the Paquita Grand Pas that was presented in last year's Bolshoi Academy Graduation Concert (June '07)? I'm curious if this is the version that will be staged by Burlaka for the 'grown-up' troupe next fall.

I'm also happy to read that Sergei Vikharev's reconstruction of Petipa-Ceccheti's Coppelia will be staged in spring '09. I fondly remember Vikharev's staging for Novosibirsk Ballet ca 2001. There had been some talk at the time that it would go to the Kirov-Mariinsky but it came to nothing; glad that it's finally going to one of the top-two ballet companies of Russia.

#50 Helene

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Posted 03 March 2008 - 11:48 PM

Ismene Brown on the succession in The Telegraph:

Bolshoi Ballet: 'Molotov cocktail' springs surprise changes

And she concludes with more news:

Meanwhile at St Petersburg's Maryinsky Ballet, formerly the Kirov, it emerges that Makhar Vaziev, who has long suffered the disdain of the Maryinsky's celebrated director Valery Gergiev, will quit as ballet chief next year. The battle for his chair is likely to be similarly pitiless.



#51 canbelto

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 03:18 PM

Wow. I really wonder if someone as old and set in his ways as Grigorivich will be good for the Bolshoi.

#52 swan

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 04:21 PM

Dear Natalia,
Thank you very much. I am Russian and love ballet. I canít find information about Russian ballet tours. We saw Romeo and Juliet of St. Peterburg State Ballet Theatreon Sunday. It was amazing and great. We didnít expect. I wrote to the Theater but they didnít answer where they have performances now.
Thanks.

#53 delibes

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Posted 04 March 2008 - 06:24 PM

I have translated some of the Bolshoi directorship articles from yesterday's Russian press. The details are interesting and the expressions of opinon are not held back. Two of the critics liken the appointmnt of Grigorovich alongside Burlaka as akin to Stalin being disinterred and brought back to life, offered a job as minister under Medvedev.

In an interview with Tatiana Kuznetsova in Kommersant headlined: "Ratmansky is succeeded by Burlaka and Grigorovich," Burlaka said that he liked being unknown & working at the quiet out-of-centre company in Kuzminki, the "Russian State Ballet." He had stayed there because he wanted to work in a company where 90 percent of the repertory was classical. He agreed that he "did not know well" the contemporary scene, but had been interested when he had danced Kylian, Neimeyer, Eifman. He had enjoyed the work of Jean Christoph Mayot (Mayo?). Mr Ixanov the general director had spoken to him about the job just 10 days before the appointment was announced. He had not known then that he would be Yuri Grigorovich's boss. Asked what he thought about it, he said that it was a large boulder which ... the interviewer finished for him, ... he could not move. He answered that everyone in the theatre was raised and educated on Grigorvich's ballets. Asked whether Grigorovich's versions of classics were immovable and imperishable, he said that G's outlook on classical productions to a certain extent advanced the choreographic process.
Q: If YG demanded that leading roles in his productions were danced by, say, Anastasia Volochkova, what then? A: I will argue with that... The BB's heritage dated from the end of the 18th century, including many and varied styles and different epochs which could all re-enter the company's repertoire.
Q: Contemporary creators? Are you limiting yourself to Ratmansky? A: Many choreographers in the west worthy of having their works performed at the Bolshoi, or any other theatre.
Q: Are you not frightened of being artistic director at the BB, which will not be a simple job? A: I will find a common language with the dancers and coaches. I am not by nature a quarrelsome person. It's necessary to examine each individual case for itself and think about it.

Kuznetsova commented separately that this is a directorship with two heads, and neither young Burlaka nor old Grigorovich is interested in contemporary choreography, underlined by the plans for the reopening of the restored theatre. The BB which has recently recovered its position in the first rank of world companies risks going backwards. Already the company considers that Grigorovich will be their future boss and not Burlaka who was in his cradle when YG won the Lenin prize for Spartacus. by their act the theatre directorship has set off a delayed-action bomb in the company.

Anna Gordeyeva in Vremya novostey: Although Burlaka is not well known in the country, he commands absolute respect in ballet circles for his academic work. For 20 years he has been soloist and then director of the Russian State Ballet, and last year worked with Ratmansky on the staging of Le corsaire.H is a cultured, clever and intelligent man. But one would rather sympathise with him than congratulate him on the appointment.

Ixanov had ensure that the job is not a pot of honey. Ratmansky being kept as guest choreographer, though the job is only an agreement at the moment, isn't too bad as he and Burlaka are good friends and speak the same language. What is more important, is the position of choreographer/balletmaster, offered to Yuri Grigorovich. In fact this is a deliberate undermining of the artistic directors job: whoever casts ballerinas in classical roles is the director of the theatre. Does Ixsanov understand what he has done? He is aware that he has never seen Grigorovich's Krasnodar company and cannot judge whether the choreograher is capable of sustaining his productions in continuing life (since your columnist has seen that company, we can say at once : he is not capable.) Ixanov is not prepared for the return of Grigorovich's beloved Anastasia Volochkova to the Bolshoi theatre. Everything would be agreed, he said, among the leaders "we are civilised people." Well, indeed. For 20 years the gloomy old man has not created a production, but reproduced copies of old ones in other companies (including some very bad ones,) preserving just one skill - for virtuoso intrigues. And the young, clever, talented dancemakers (Burlaka, Ratmansky, and next season's guest Sergei Vikarev) will come to agreement with him? Do they themselves agree about that?

Maya Krilova in gazeta.ru analysed the reasons why Ratmansky wanted to quit the directorship. Being at the Bolshoi in the job was stopping him reaching his own high standards as a choreographer, standards he had formed while working in the West for many years. In the Bolshoi dancers have become permitted to refuse to dance steps, just saying that they will change them. They would even alter them in performance to suit themselves.

Ratmansky's current scheduled presence in the rep consists of the remounting of 'Flames of Paris' in summer, running an autumn festival for the 50th anniversary of the careers of V Vassiliev and E Masimova, the transition period of working with Burlaka, and other work abroad. There is a general plan for him to make a new version of 'the Sleeping Beauty,' something that he has long wanted to do, for the reopening of the theatr in 2009. But she asks, will he in fact fulfill all this when Grigorovich is officially called up, and considering that all the Tchaikovsky ballets are entirely in Grigorovich's productions?
For that matter, Grigorovich's official job in the Bolshoi will be resident choreographer (ballet-master), even though that does not imply that he will produce any new ballets. He has not done for a long time. He will however vigilantly guard his ballet oeuvre from encroachments by people or time.

And who will get what in the distrbution of duty? Grigorovich has one, very large segment; Ratmansky another, in the staging of new ballets and his own future creations, to do which he will "pay court" to the company by periodic visits to Moscow (He will it is said be living in the US). All the rest comes down to Burlaka, ie the "no-mans-land" ballets, like Pharoah's daughter, Sylphide and Don Quixote. Apart from that, the AD is required to set casting. To find new names for the posters. And to correct members of the ballet triumvirate if they exceed their brief.

But this is only on paper. In reality the Bolshoi ballet anticipates a period of internal turbulence and unrest. A power struggle and an aggravation of "anarchy", all the more as Burlaka does not possess the iron authoritarian character that is needed here and that Grigorovich's presence underlines. This is a company unfortunately which better understands the whip than the kind word, and they take flexibility as weakness. Krilova said that artists should study the ballet La Sylphide to see what bad things happen when you pin down a dream.

#54 drb

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 07:05 PM

Happy 40th birthday to Alexei Ratmansky. From his birthday telegram* from President Dmitry Medvedev:

"You have received wide recognition both within Russia and abroad as a gifted dancer and choreographer - a true master, able to feel fine music and create unique, deep images on stage.

Talent and a sincere passion for the profession enable you to successfully guide the celebrated ballet troupe of the Bolshoi Theatre. I am sure you will continue to make a worthy contribution to the development of native culture and give joy to many viewers with excellent performances ".


* entry: 27/VIII-2008 11:20
http://www.kremlin.r...ws.shtml#205800

#55 carbro

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 08:37 PM

It's his birthday??? Thanks for that info, drb.

Nice tribute from Medvedev. Sounds like it was written by a true balletomane.

Happy Birthday from me, too! :wink: :D

#56 anin

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 04:50 AM

It's his birthday??? Thanks for that info, drb.

Nice tribute from Medvedev. Sounds like it was written by a true balletomane.

Happy Birthday from me, too! :flowers: :yahoo:

You must be kidding! How would you know he is a true balletomane.It's true that there are some cultured politicians,but in most cases they have people to do that kind of thing for them.Reminds me of NIKITA congratulating Van Cliburn and talking about his interpretation of Chopin.

#57 Ostrich

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 08:46 AM

I remember hearing that Dmitry Medvedev can dance a gopak, so maybe he knows something about dance (although I have no doubt that he has a specialised crew of people to deal with situations like this).

#58 drb

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 10:16 AM

On his Kremlin bio page the President makes no mention of dance, but is interested in music:

I still find time to listen to rock music. I began listening to it when I was about 13-14. A home-grown rock music scene was starting to develop in the Soviet Union at that time. Although it made use of the same musical principles, instruments and arrangements found all around the world, our rock music was always based very much on the texts too, unlike English-language rock music, which, to be honest, was always a lot more primitive. Our songs were protest songs, songs with a social message and simply music that was about our life, about all its different aspects.
But one needs to do more than just listen to rock music. One should listen to classical music too. Rock music and classical music are very close. Rock, jazz, and classical music are all part of one and the same musical process. One should also read good books - a real way to relax - and then everything will go well.


However his wife Svetlana, an economist, seems to have an interest in the arts:

Svetlana Medvedeva is involved in supporting social and cultural programmes in Russia and a number of European cities.
In 2006 she initiated the Russian Arts Festival in Bari, Italy, which now takes place as an annual event.
Svetlana Medvedeva is Chairwoman of the Board of Trustees of the targeted comprehensive programme ĎSpiritual and Moral Culture for the Youth of Russiaí, established with the blessing of Patriarch Alexii II.


It would seem that retired President Putin was more of a ballet fan, as he has frequently been photographed presenting bouquets to ballerinas.

http://www.kremlin.r...cle200253.shtml

#59 bart

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 11:04 AM

Thanks, drd, for those links and for your insights. The government page for Medvedvev, rather like a 50s version designed by the old Saturday Evening Post, is quite an eye-opener as to political style in Russia today. One might almost guess that Norman Rockwell is alive and doing pr for the Kremlin. :wink: :D

#60 Sacto1654

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 05:42 AM

It would seem that retired President Putin was more of a ballet fan, as he has frequently been photographed presenting bouquets to ballerinas.


I believe that Putin has always been seen passing out major awards to Russians such as the People's Artist of Russia (I've seen a picture of him awarding Mariinsky principal ballerina Diana Vishneva this very award, which was done just recently).


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